• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Raising a stall floor

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Raising a stall floor

    I need some ideas here. . . I went out to the boarding barn where I keep my horses last night to find one of their stalls completely flooded out. We've had a fair amount of rain lately, and apparently this has been a long-time problem at this barn, and particularly in this stall. The stalls are dirt floored with rubber mats, and the water is coming up from underneath the mats.

    They have a few open stalls in the barn, so we were able to move him to another dry stall for now, but I really like the location of his stall he has been in and would love to keep that one.

    The barn owner is pretty cool with whatever I'd like to do to fix the problem, though the real problem is on the outside of the barn, and they've been saying for months that they're going to do some bobcat work to get the ground to slope away from the barn so that the water will not run under the barn. . . . the realistic chances of the problem being fixed on the outside of the barn are slim to none knowing how they operate (all talk and no action). So. . . as our MN winter approaches (sure to bring flooding in the spring when the snow melts), I am trying to come up with at least a temporary solution to the problem so my horse can go back in his stall.

    My thought was to add some rock of some sort (my dad's an engineer, recommended something called keystone, but I can't seem to find it) to the floor of the stall to raise it up an inch or two, then put down some sand to level it off. My dad had also suggested I could try a layer of landscaping cloth between the rock and the sand to prevent the sand from filtering down between the rock and wicking up the water. So essentially, by doing this, it would not change where the water was at (so it shouldn't divert the water into other neighboring stalls), but it would raise my boy's stall up so he was above it, rather than in it. Now, my dad is an engineer, not a horseman, so I don't know if that plan would work for a horse stall? Has anyone done this? What kind of rock do you recommend- can I use a different type? Any other suggestions? I'd really appreciate some feedback as I'd like to get this done this weekend before we have too cold of temps here. Thanks in advance!!

    -Leah

  • #2
    We have the same problem, although no mats, I am adding mats this year. After a rain when the ground is soft I take a pick-ax and go along the whole outside of the barn and dig a trench and divert the water around the barn. I have to do this about 2 maybe three times a year, hard work, but really doesn't take too long. Need to do it soon.

    Curious what others say about your idea, it sounds like it could work...my worry is mold underneath.
    I want a signature but I have nothing original to say except: "STHU and RIDE!!!

    Wonderful COTHER's I've met: belleellis, stefffic, snkstacres and janedoe726.

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Originally posted by Chardavej View Post
      Curious what others say about your idea, it sounds like it could work...my worry is mold underneath.
      oh, don't worry, after 50 years of this problem with this barn being built in a swamp, I'm sure there's tons of mold underneath the mats anyhow.

      Comment


      • #4
        I know the problem, we live about an hour east of St. Paul and have
        about the same rain. I have two ideas for you. First, consider renting
        the bobcat yourselves and moving some earth outside the barn to
        correct the drainage. This will end the problem and might make
        you the hero of the whole barn.

        Second, go to Menards (or similar) and get a bunch of used railroad
        ties. Make a floor of the stall with these and put the rubber mats
        back on top of them (level the dirt first). This will raise the floor
        of the stall a good 6" and the rail ties won't rot out very quickly
        with all the preservative used in them.

        Oh, and you probably can't find keystone because it is called
        something else (unless your dad is from this area). Seems that
        the name for types of stone is very regional. The type of stone
        that seems to be most available (and cheapest) in this region
        is limestone broken to various sizes for various use.
        Robin from Dancing Horse Hill
        Elmwood, Wisconsin

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Robin@DHH View Post
          Second, go to Menards (or similar) and get a bunch of used railroad
          ties. Make a floor of the stall with these and put the rubber mats
          back on top of them (level the dirt first). This will raise the floor
          of the stall a good 6" and the rail ties won't rot out very quickly
          with all the preservative used in them.
          That's a great idea!!
          I want a signature but I have nothing original to say except: "STHU and RIDE!!!

          Wonderful COTHER's I've met: belleellis, stefffic, snkstacres and janedoe726.

          Comment


          • #6
            I just did this with my own barn- I leveled it out, put down landscape cloth, and then put in tiny pea gravel called turkey grit. This makes a wonderful dry, easily drained base that i can either leave as is an use it as bedding or can level and place mats on top of.... my horses will have dry feet and no mud this year!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Luckydonkey View Post
              I just did this with my own barn- I leveled it out, put down landscape cloth, and then put in tiny pea gravel called turkey grit. This makes a wonderful dry, easily drained base that i can either leave as is an use it as bedding or can level and place mats on top of.... my horses will have dry feet and no mud this year!

              So your horses are actually standing on the gravel? This is something I have been considering in my stalls. Do you find it comfy for them to stand in and lay down in?

              Comment


              • #8
                Sounds like Dad's suggestions are pretty good!

                G.
                Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  thanks everyone!

                  My dad is from around here, and told me where he got his stone- they have it at a landscaping place around here, about $50 for a yard, so that will raise my 10x10 stall pretty well! I think it might be a form of limestone. Then, because the water level is about equal with the concrete aisle in front of the stal, and we're going to be raising the floor up quite a bit, we're going to put in some brick pavers at the stall entrance to make a "step" and act as a retaining wall to keep the stone in the stall.

                  My dad's not sure if we will even need the sand because the keystone is pretty small and decently soft, and he thinks that would probably create a nice level base that won't be as mobile as sand or pea gravel when it gets tromped on.

                  I like the railroad ties idea, but I would worry that that might affect some of the stalls around him and cause them to flood out, and would probably be a lot more labor intensive (cutting them to length and fitting them in the stall to be level) both now and 20 years from now when somebody decides to re-do the place.

                  Got this all planned for this weekend with hubby's help, so I'll let you know how it turns out! Keeping my fingers crossed!

                  I talked to the instructor at the barn too, and she's got some plans for the outside of the barn, apparently there are some trees that are growing roots under the barn and damaging the sill plate, so she's hoping to reconstruct that outside of the barn with some rail road ties, etc, then do some excavating with the slopes, etc, but lord knows when that will happen- most likely never. All talk, once again. So, we'll start with this plan as this is actually feasibly possible in the next few months lol.

                  I'm open to additional suggestions too if anyone has got any! Thanks!
                  -Leah

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    This happens when the water table is higher than the stall floor. We just use dirt, or clay if we can find it. Rocks/gravel will not block water, but dirt will. Simply raise the level of the floor with 6 to 8" of clay or dirt, stomp it down a bit, and no more flooding.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      All my stalls in one barn are 8-12" higher than the aisle and outside.
                      I added stonedust, put mats above that, and no more flooding.

                      It certainly is not a pleasant site to see your stalls flooded in the middle of a janurary thaw.

                      It might be overkill and a bit high, but I don't care, the horses have learned to step down, and I don't worry about them standing in water or sump pumping all night.
                      save lives...spay/neuter/geld

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by fivehorses View Post
                        All my stalls in one barn are 8-12" higher than the aisle and outside.
                        I added stonedust, put mats above that, and no more flooding.

                        It certainly is not a pleasant site to see your stalls flooded in the middle of a janurary thaw.

                        It might be overkill and a bit high, but I don't care, the horses have learned to step down, and I don't worry about them standing in water or sump pumping all night.
                        I agree! Ours our built up with a substantial layer of stone dust and rubber matted.

                        I am blessed that DH works for a public contractor and drainage and all that jazz is his gig. We have the whole barn built up now with a system of drainage that diverts even major flooding from the barn and keeps a dry lot area for the pasture horses in the event of major flooding. Nice dry horsies and I sleep much better.
                        I Loff My Quarter Horse & I love Fenway Bartholomule cliques

                        Just somebody with a positive outlook on life...go ahead...hate me for that.

                        Comment

                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          thanks, good recommendations.

                          fivehorses- I don't know what part of the country you are in, but we usually don't have much for January thaws. Everything is usually still pretty frozen solid at that point lol.

                          Fairview Horse Center- the barn manager had recommended adding the crushed concrete that they have already at the barn, but it has a lot of fine particles, clay, etc in it. We were thinking we wanted to avoid all those fine particles because they will hold on to water. Also, I don't want to pack his stall down with solid clay unless all the surrounding stalls are also done because I really don't want to cause anybody else's stall to flood out.

                          equineartworks- that sounds really nice! Unfortunately this barn was built in a swamp many years ago, not really raised up from the surrounding land, and there is NO drainage system, then a big housing development was put in all around it, building up the land surrounding and causing this place to be the lowest ground around now. It's just fine when we get no rain like earlier this summer, but when we have wet weather, it's design flaws really stand out.

                          I'm thinking we'll try to raise it up a good 2-3 inches. He's used to stepping up as he has always had to step up to get in his stall at the barn we were at previously. My other thing that I'll have to figure out is the stall door- they don't go all the way to the ground, there is about a 6-8" opening at the bottom of the stall door. If his stall floor is higher than the aisle and the door doesn't go all the way down, that could be a little dangerous. Perhaps we could just move the door down so it's flush with the bottom of the stall floor- they're half doors, so that probably wouldn't be a big deal. . . we'll see.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by SecretHavenFarm View Post
                            So your horses are actually standing on the gravel? This is something I have been considering in my stalls. Do you find it comfy for them to stand in and lay down in?
                            So far so good with it- it is very comfortable to lay on- I layed on it, and it is pretty cozy! The poop scoops right out of it too- which makes it nice! and since it is round rock, it will not get packed in like gravel will- one dump truck load was more than enough for my 2 stalls-which are 12X17... and we put it in about 6 to 8 inches thick...I did put a rubber matt down in the front corner under the hay feeder though...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Leah, if you add gravel make sure you rent a power tamper. You won't regret it.
                              ::Sometimes you have to burn a few bridges to keep the crazies from following you::

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Adding gravel will keep your stall from flooding, but it will keep the wetness/dampness under the mats. This can really become a problem if you have a disease go thru your barn, or a horse with allergy problems. Gravel is good for drainage if it has someplace to go. Barns are built with gravel, and clay on top, but the gravel it all under, and will drain it away.

                                You are right though, in that if another stall nearby is low, the water will go there.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I live in NH, and we can get a january thaw.
                                  I came out to the barn with the snow melting off the roof and probably a foot of water in the stalls. Fortunately, my horses were able to come and go, but still. Imagine over a foot of snow on the roof, temps in the 50's, sunny and 4' of snow on the ground, and well, a massive melt.

                                  That summer, we built up the stalls with stonedust, and then the mats. I also had a trench dug around the barn, and gutters installed. There was no way I was living through that nightmare again. I sump pumped all night to keep the water from coming into the barn. I don't think we have had such a severe thaw since, but I think my barn would hold up.

                                  I don't find it moldy under the mats. It is stone dust...it gets wet, it dries, etc. Its stone.

                                  I do have a dirt aisle in that barn, and am thinking about putting down stone dust, mostly due to the fact the ground water seems to make the aisle 'wet'. I think there is more mold issues in the aisle, where the soil is damp, then in the stalls.
                                  Also, my mats in the stalls do not get that 'wet' surface that occurs sometimes in damp weather(in the other barn). They seem to stay dry. I think I used almost 12 tons of stonedust for 3 12x16 stalls....yup, a lot of stone dust.
                                  I also spray it with a hose, find that and smoothing it out makes for a very well compacted base.
                                  save lives...spay/neuter/geld

                                  Comment

                                  Working...
                                  X