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Dog with hotspot having weird symptoms

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  • Dog with hotspot having weird symptoms

    Earlier thread discussed ER visit Saturday night with my dog with the nasty, expensive hotspot. Dog is now on antibiotics, Metacam and Animax ointment. She has been doing fine until today. Daughter calls and says she is shaking intermittently. Then calls later and says she'll drink a tiny bit and then stand and stare for several minutes. She also keeps running into our shower and sitting. Nothing definitive but just really weird behavior. Since I've gotten home, she has been VERY clingy.

    I called our vet, but they have no available appointments so will charge me an ER fee to fit me in So, I take their first available, which is 5pm tomorrow and unless my dog looks much worse, we'll wait.

    I'm wondering if she is having some type of reaction to the Animax cream or the Metacam? She has been on Cephalexin several times and no problems there. She only shakes when she is settled up against me, almost as if she is scared and looking for comfort.

    Anyone seen weird symptoms like this?

  • #2
    The Animax contains a corticosteroid and so increased drinking and urination--especially if the dog is licking the area--wouldn't worry me too much.

    Metacam is an NSAID. If the dog is licking off the topical and taking an NSAID, that might not be good. There's also a really rare liver issue with Metacam that could potentially cause some issues.

    My best guess? Your pet doesn't feel well and is being clingy like a sick little kid.

    There's nothing there that's particularly alarming to me...but I'm not a vet....

    Hope your pup feels better soon!
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Buddyroo, that would make sense. The ER clinic Saturday put Gold Bond powder over the ointment. So when we got home, everytime I applied cream, we had to fight her to keep her from licking it off as I put it on. So we started putting Gold Bond powder over the ointment and that seemed to deter her some, but I'd bet she's still licking it some.

      I think we're going to discontinue the Metacam...tonight was her last night anyway. The hotspot itself looks much better. Mostly dry with the exception of one small place in the crase of her neck.

      Thanks.

      Comment


      • #4
        Is she a little dog? Seems as though little dogs become a bit more "dramatic" about things when they are not feeling well...shaking, crying, hiding etc....
        Is she eating, drinking normally??

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Actually, she is a lab/heeler cross...with more of the lab temperament. And she is very smart. Now that I've been watching her this evening, I do think it is more dramatics. Just going about the course of her activities, she'll suddenly freeze and stare for a few minutes. Then, I got the bright idea to bathe her (in a very mild soap safe for her hotspot...she is very stinky and her wound was getting crusty and nasty) and evidently that made her itch again so I had to douse her with Gold Bond to make the itch stop.

          Comment


          • #6
            After applying the ointment, it's always a good idea to distract them for a few minutes. So, if you're doing it twice a day, do it right before feeding her breakfast and dinner (if she's a good eater), or before her morning and evening walks.

            Comment


            • #7
              If she can lick any of the ointment either directly or off a paw it may be leaving a nasty taste in her mouth. You could leave the hot spot naked for an evening and see if that helps. Or, could she be having a mild upset belly from the medications especially the antibiotic?

              Comment


              • #8
                We've always had success with curing hotspots on the farm dogs, and a long term spot on a scientist's arm, previously treated by several MD's, with:

                http://www.chrissystems.com/peace.htm
                www.HistoricHousePreservation.com

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  Thanks guys! I will check out that link, Tom. We've been lucky not to have dealt with a hotspot like this before but I guess its good that I learn! Tonight I skipped the ointment and just put the powder on to help relieve the itch and dry it up more. I also skipped the metacam and just gave her the antibiotics. She has settled down more in the past hour or so. I was just getting a little paranoid (and did NOT want to wind up at the ER clinic again tonight ).

                  Good suggestion, Ben. I do try to distract her, but tomorrow I will wait to feed her until time to do the ointment. She is very food motivated so that may do the trick.

                  Thanks again everyone

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Not sure what you feed, but you might want to try a high quality grain free food if you are having your dog get hot spots. I have a GSD mix that had skin problems on both Purina One and Pedigree. I switched to Taste of the wild "prairie" formula, and the skin problems went away completely. She also gained a lot of weight, when for 6 yrs, she was a "hard keeper".

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I think its unlikely that the amount of steroid in the Animax being ingested to cause a reaction with an NSAID. Pets do occasionally exhibit weird hiding, posturing, and Velcro behaviora when in mild pain or anxiety. I hope he continues to improve so you don't have another big bill!
                      From now on, ponyfixer, i'll include foot note references.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jetsmom View Post
                        Not sure what you feed, but you might want to try a high quality grain free food if you are having your dog get hot spots. I have a GSD mix that had skin problems on both Purina One and Pedigree. I switched to Taste of the wild "prairie" formula, and the skin problems went away completely. She also gained a lot of weight, when for 6 yrs, she was a "hard keeper".
                        Just so you (everyone!) know....

                        MOST dogs with seasonal pruritis leading to secondary infection and hotspots (superficial pyoderma) have environmental allergies, with insect bite (flea bite) reactions being #1. All it takes is one bite to set off a cascade of events leading to one big hot spot. In the summer, these animals can be given flea prevention every 2 weeks to really keep the risk of bites down.

                        As for food allergies... dogs are allergic to PROTEIN, not grain. Usually, it's beef, milk, eggs, chicken, or turkey. It's a common myth that dogs are allergic to grains, since people are, and that's what people identify with. However, this is very rarely true. Keep that in mind when considering a dietary change. Switching to a novel protein diet (a diet with a protein your dog has never before encountered, free of any other previously fed proteins) is essential in making this diagnosis of food allergies.

                        Jetsmom, I would bet your dog was sensitive to soy, since the Prairie formula has just about every animal protein under the sun (chicken, bison/beef, venison, lamb, fish) in it. Very doubtful it was the grain, though.

                        Food allergies are usually nonseasonal -- i.e. it doesn't matter what time of the year it is...your dog is itchy, licking its paws or butt, getting ear infections, etc.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by BelladonnaLily View Post
                          Actually, she is a lab/heeler cross...with more of the lab temperament. And she is very smart. Now that I've been watching her this evening, I do think it is more dramatics. Just going about the course of her activities, she'll suddenly freeze and stare for a few minutes. Then, I got the bright idea to bathe her (in a very mild soap safe for her hotspot...she is very stinky and her wound was getting crusty and nasty) and evidently that made her itch again so I had to douse her with Gold Bond to make the itch stop.
                          If you can get a shampoo with 3% chlorhexadine (or 2% even) that is best for controlling the secondary infection that makes the skin so oozy and stinky.

                          Comment

                          • Original Poster

                            #14
                            Thanks Pancake. Actually, I DO think it was a flea bite that started this. She was late getting her Frontline, I went out of town, and then when I saw her itching, I wanted to bathe her before the Frontline. She is 6, and never had a hotspot before, so I wasn't too concerned. Also, she's been on the same feed since she was a puppy, so again, I don't think it is the feed.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Pancakes View Post
                              Just so you (everyone!) know....

                              MOST dogs with seasonal pruritis leading to secondary infection and hotspots (superficial pyoderma) have environmental allergies, with insect bite (flea bite) reactions being #1. All it takes is one bite to set off a cascade of events leading to one big hot spot. In the summer, these animals can be given flea prevention every 2 weeks to really keep the risk of bites down.

                              As for food allergies... dogs are allergic to PROTEIN, not grain. Usually, it's beef, milk, eggs, chicken, or turkey. It's a common myth that dogs are allergic to grains, since people are, and that's what people identify with. However, this is very rarely true. Keep that in mind when considering a dietary change. Switching to a novel protein diet (a diet with a protein your dog has never before encountered, free of any other previously fed proteins) is essential in making this diagnosis of food allergies.

                              Jetsmom, I would bet your dog was sensitive to soy, since the Prairie formula has just about every animal protein under the sun (chicken, bison/beef, venison, lamb, fish) in it. Very doubtful it was the grain, though.

                              Food allergies are usually nonseasonal -- i.e. it doesn't matter what time of the year it is...your dog is itchy, licking its paws or butt, getting ear infections, etc.
                              Top four common food allergies are chicken, beef, corn and wheat. Which is why novel protein diets also usually only have one carb source, i.e. duck and potato, venison and potato, or rabbit and green pea. This is also why some food allergy dogs do so well on grain free diets. For them it is a grain allergy not a protein source.

                              Katherine
                              Vet Tech
                              You can't fix stupid.... but you can breed it!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                dog with hot spot having weird symptoms

                                Have you tried an e-collar-that funky funnel looking collar they put around dog's necks. As long as your dog can lick the wound it will never heal. My shep had an infected hot spot type lesion but after just 36 hours in the collar it was dried up and he never bothered it again. Good Luck!

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by BelladonnaLily View Post
                                  Thanks Pancake. Actually, I DO think it was a flea bite that started this. She was late getting her Frontline, I went out of town, and then when I saw her itching, I wanted to bathe her before the Frontline. She is 6, and never had a hotspot before, so I wasn't too concerned. Also, she's been on the same feed since she was a puppy, so again, I don't think it is the feed.
                                  Pups can definitely be allergic to fleas (causing flea allergy dermatitis), so that might very well be your culprit! Just found this site on a quick google search... http://www.dr-dan.com/flea.htm
                                  Nasty buggers...

                                  ETA: Not sure an e-collar would be helpful here since it sounds like it would have to rest right on the hotspot. Ouch!

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by BelladonnaLily View Post
                                    Thanks Pancake. Actually, I DO think it was a flea bite that started this. She was late getting her Frontline, I went out of town, and then when I saw her itching, I wanted to bathe her before the Frontline. She is 6, and never had a hotspot before, so I wasn't too concerned. Also, she's been on the same feed since she was a puppy, so again, I don't think it is the feed.
                                    Yeah, that sounds like flea allergy dermatitis. It only takes 1 bite!

                                    During the summer, you can put the frontline or advantage on every 2 weeks instead of every 4 to better keep this under control.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by Horsegal984 View Post
                                      Top four common food allergies are chicken, beef, corn and wheat. Which is why novel protein diets also usually only have one carb source, i.e. duck and potato, venison and potato, or rabbit and green pea. This is also why some food allergy dogs do so well on grain free diets. For them it is a grain allergy not a protein source.

                                      Katherine
                                      Vet Tech
                                      Just curious, what reference are you using? I just did a search of the recent literature and couldn't find anything that cited these as the "top four." Proteins have been shown/proven to cause the greatest increase in food allergen-specific IgE.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        I was always told that dogs are usually allergic to the protein sources in food. But one of ours seems to develop allergies over time, and is finally doing well on a grain-free food (Now Adult Dog).

                                        In our case it seems like the grains somehow were responsible for skin problems. Even the Orijen fish-only food bothered him after a while.

                                        So if you are having allergies/skin problems with your dog, it may be worth trying one of the grain-free foods.

                                        Comment

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