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Electric fence help...what to buy

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  • Electric fence help...what to buy

    Hi!
    I have searched and read alot of other threads and gotten a much better idea of what to do, but I do have a few specific questions. Which, I'll also ask at the store, but....

    I'm going to have to replace some wire fencing and figure I would do the electric fence. I don't want to do wire again, but can't decide on which brand of tape or cord to use. I suppose it's just a matter of what I can get?! Roughly the same throughout?! Do I need to stick to one that seems horsey specific or can I just get something for cows and have it work just as well?

    ALso..does the type of fence I get (cord vs tape, etc) determine the charger to get?! It looked like the zareba was for ...oh never mind.. I see. And I've also answered the whole "can it be used in wooded, weeded areas" question. Thanks!!

    But now... I have wooden posts that are sturdy and already there..> I can just hammer/screw the brackets/insulator thingys on right?! I did see to get the deckmate screws with the TORX bits to make life easier.

    and then... How do you teach the horses about it?! I'm pretty sure they've all seen electric fence at some point in time... I guess just let them touch it and they'll figure it out?!?

    Is it better to do three strand or four strand or two?!? It will not be perimeter fencing really (thought it will enhance my perimeter fence) but will mostly be used to divide pastures. I do have a new yearling as well as a bit of a bully/fence pawer/butthead horse.

    I think those are my main questions....Oh, I also saw that horsequard has some new tape that doesn't need grounding?! Would that be better for a somewhat electrically challenged person?!

    Thanks!! I aim to knock this out this week before my horse rips another shoe off!!! Argh!
  • Original Poster

    #2
    one more question....

    The electrobraid website says you need to mow to keep the weeds off before they get too unruly. Then when I look at some of the other ones..the chargers say they are okay with weeds.... My area I'm fencing is fairly woodsy... Should I stick with something other than the electrobraid?!?

    Thanks in advance!

    Comment


    • #3
      In general, if weeds touch your fence, they will dissipate charge. You don't want weeds touching your fence.

      I like Horseguard, but you cannot buy it locally: it has to be ordered. People here say it is better than the tapes you can buy in a store. I don't know, because I believed them and Horseguard is all I have used.

      More strands will be more secure. Horseguard says 2 is enough for horses who don't challenge the fence, and I am keeping two retirees in a grass pasture with two strands.

      I also bought my charger online: it's solar and a Parmak, per recommendations here. You want a 12 V. It doesn't matter what kind of fence you're driving.

      Keeping things grounded is a pain, and the ground rods are surprisingly expensive. The Horseguard bipolar tape is good for situations where the ground is very dry and is not carrying the electric current back to the ground rod. This can happen on my land; it's not so likely in a climate that is moist year-round.
      If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Thanks! I did see about the 12 v battery.

        So... as far as the weeds.... Would this type of fencing really not work for a wooded area then?! On the back sides I've got a lot of weeds and viney stuff growing on the fence. I suppose I could pull the fenceline in a foot or two to help keep the stuff off it, but... it's a very wooded/weedy area... So not conducive to horseys but...it's what I've got....

        Here's a pic of the pasture I really need to fence...
        http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i2...ockremoved.jpg
        It's hard to tell based on the pic, but as you can see, it's pretty wooded. Just on the other side of my horse is the line that really needs to be fenced, so maybe it's not going to have too much debris.... it sorta winds between the trees.
        http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i2...ookingfine.jpg
        And then behind her is the backside that I'd like to fence in too, but not the part that the other horse is pawing at and destroying. This side is going to be very covered with bushes and stuff...though I suppose I could move the fenceline in... just would mean having to redo posts...

        Is there anything that works well even with a lot of "debris"!???

        Thanks again!!!!

        Comment


        • #5
          I just got some Horseguard fence to make an inside perimeter and really like it. Strong, visible, super easy to put up (I did it myself.)
          I did not think it was very expensive compared to a lot of other options, and the wide tape is much safer than rope in my opinion!
          "When life gives you scurvy, make lemonade."

          Comment


          • #6
            PS: After looking at your photos, I wanted to add that I am using mine in Aspen trees (partly to keep the horses OFF the trees) and mine are way denser than yours.
            "When life gives you scurvy, make lemonade."

            Comment


            • #7
              Trees nearby are fine, but you can't have vines or weeds touching the electric portion of the fence, or they'll leak charge back to the ground. In practice, I find that the horses do a decent job of keeping the weeds directly underneath my fence from getting too high most of the time, with me just having to patrol for stray grasses that bend over to it. Water condenses on the fence at night and drips off in the morning, so often the lushest grass is under the fence line. If the weeds that you have are unpalatable, then yes, you will have to clear under the fence regularly in order to keep a strong charge on the fence.

              One thing you might do is electrically isolate the portion with the dense brush so it can't short out the whole fence. You'd need two chargers, though, or you'd need to leave the dense side uncharged. Uncharged tape will only contain horses who are happy to be contained.

              If you want a fence that will contain horses even when touched by a lot of plant material, you'll have to explore non-electric options.
              If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket

              Comment


              • #8
                I have used and seen many types of fence in the past and I have to say Horseguard is the best - it does not stretch or sag, and I've found that once it's up, barring any really weird things like a tree falling on it - it's up.

                I did find it pricier than other options, but it's the poop for permanent fencing.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I love this one sheep fencing place they do a GREAT job with horse fence too. the entire catalog is electrical stuff.
                  http://www.premier1supplies.com/

                  their site has design outlines and material lists, too.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Love the Premier stuff!!!

                    I get their electric rope (not the braided stuff, the less expensive IntelliRope) and FiberRod posts. When I get my 6' posts, I'm going with two strands of IntelliRope and a bottom strand of IntelliTwine. Currently have two stands on the 5' FiberRod postsand three strands on my steel T posts (I think they're 6').

                    Two is more than plenty to keep my horses in -- but I want to make sure I can keep stray horses (and hopefully the neighbor's dogs) OUT.

                    Tapes just don't have a long enough life expectancy to be worth it. Plus, a freezing rain with heavy wet snow can drag it clear to the ground. I wouldn't mind HorseGuard, but I'd have to have help to put it up and it's got almost zero portablity. The Premier rope, I can put it up singlehanded and fairly quickly and if I decide to move it or need to readjust it, I can.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by greysandbays View Post
                      Tapes just don't have a long enough life expectancy to be worth it. Plus, a freezing rain with heavy wet snow can drag it clear to the ground. I wouldn't mind HorseGuard, but I'd have to have help to put it up and it's got almost zero portablity. The Premier rope, I can put it up singlehanded and fairly quickly and if I decide to move it or need to readjust it, I can.
                      I don't understand what you mean here by zero portability. I move and reset my HorseGuard all the time, mostly by myself. Occasionally I enlist a helper because I am using really tall T-posts at the corners, and I can't manage to set one straight without a second pair of hands. That's why I have HorseGuard.
                      If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by poltroon View Post
                        I don't understand what you mean here by zero portability. I move and reset my HorseGuard all the time, mostly by myself. Occasionally I enlist a helper because I am using really tall T-posts at the corners, and I can't manage to set one straight without a second pair of hands. That's why I have HorseGuard.
                        In this soil, I'd have to have REALLY deep-set (and concreted AND braced) corner posts. Every spring, the soil turns to soup and ordinary corner posts lean over. Even the line posts get sloppy and need to be reset. Even posts that don't have anything attached to them lean over.

                        I don't think the 1/2" FiberRod posts (which are really easy to reset by hand if the soil is still damp) would be sufficient support for something as beefy as HorseGuard (and even if they would, I don't know what I'd use for insulators).

                        If a fence requires T posts as line posts, I don't really consider it portable or workable singlehanded. While it CAN be done, it's not something I'm going to do unless I absolutely HAVE to, and certainly not when the posts number in the hundreds (a few corner posts here and there, not such a big deal). If I was only doing an acre or two without a lot of cross-fencing, I might amend that opinion. But not with nine acres with over a dozen different crossfences.

                        I'd love four strands of HorseGuard as a permanent permimeter fence with properly set and braced corners -- but the pennies won't stretch that far (and I want to personally see how it holds up under a half-inch coating of wet snow/freezing rain with a driving wind before I spring for it if I ever have money to burn).

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          HorseGuard sells a temporary fence kit that uses fiberglass posts, and the normal HorseGuard insulators have a slot that allows you to either screw them to a post or slide them onto the fiberglass posts. Yes, when the soil gets soupy, and the wind blows, the fiberglass posts do lean after a while... but they are easy to reset. The fence is not under significant tension, so my fence does fine with just tall T-posts in the corners, with no bracing.

                          In any case, the OP already has wooden posts installed, so this consideration does not apply to her.
                          If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket

                          Comment

                          • Original Poster

                            #14
                            Thanks for all the help. I decided to just go with whatever I can find quickly, so that I can "get er dun" and will just do the one stretch of line for now. That way I can keep the yearling safe from possible Fleck antics while allowing Fleck to get out of the round pen
                            And then... I can do some more hard core thinking and figure out the best way to really do it

                            Thanks!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Another plug for Horseguard here!!!! I built my barn last fall to get the horses home before the snow flew. I finally decided on the Horsegaurd tape fence, despite friends telling me never to use tape fences, they stretch, break, look like crap, etc.....

                              So fence went up in a snap, we used the Bi-polar due to heavy snow and nasty northeast winters. I bought a Zareba low impedence charger. Horses came home and within 7 days we had the worst ice storm this region has seen in many years. Two trees fell on my fence and the three strands were COATED in ice. But... I cannot say enough about the performance of this fence. All it took was removing trees and tightening once the ice melted or chipped off. Fence survived many snow storms and all it needed this spring was 20 minutes of tightening and it looks as good as it did when I installed it. I was extremely impressed with the entire system, including the T-post covers.

                              It is my primary fence and neither one of my boys has even challenged it. One of them has never been in electric and took to it without an issue.
                              Gone gaited....

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                Success!!!!

                                Finally...after tearing down the old wire and putting up the tape....

                                Then the charger was too weak (took advice of TSC lady....not ya'lls) so we upgraded...HOLY HOT!!! Poor Fleck went running!!! But he won't challenge it again that's for darn sure

                                And...whoever said it was a pain in the butt to nail those insulators in... you weren't kidding!!! Only about half of mine went in perfectly... and I even choked up on the hammer and hit like a man

                                but Yay!!!! It's done!!!

                                Now time to go ride

                                Thanks again for all the help!

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by FLeckenAwesome View Post
                                  And...whoever said it was a pain in the butt to nail those insulators in... you weren't kidding!!! Only about half of mine went in perfectly... and I even choked up on the hammer and hit like a man
                                  That is why we use screws and a drill to put he insulators up!!! It's quick, easy and the screws don't come back out. Nails have a tendancy to back their way out of the posts.

                                  I'm late to the party here , but I love Horsequard tape as well. It lasts, no maintenance and looks great. We used 3 strands and even have it has perimeter fencing and my horses stay away from it. It's funny they will stop about 4' from the fence!!!!

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Another vote for Horse Guard. We have miles of it and no one challanges it. In fact we haven't had a single fence injury since we started using it!
                                    Patty
                                    www.rivervalefarm.com
                                    Follow us on facebook - https://www.facebook.com/pages/River...ref=ts&fref=ts

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      DO NOT USE ELECTROBRAID!!!!!

                                      In my personal experience, that stuff is dangerous!! It will NOT break! I had a colt roll close to the fence and it wrapped around his back leg at the hock area and it was a disaster because the fence kept shocking him and the fence held it's ground. My vet, me, an ER/critical care nurse, and my ER physician husband all worked sewing and removing riddled flesh for 3 solid hours, we did not lose him but it was a miracle. He is only pasture sound as that hoof hits the ground at a weird angle and would not hold up to riding. The wound was so gapping my vet sewed in buttons and fishing lure weights and every 4-5 days I would pull the wound a bit tighter so the skin would eventually touch and heal! That hock is still twice the size of the other one and it has been years. Just be warned.

                                      Comment

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