• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

JSwan...how do you deal w/Chucky??!!

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #21
    OMG, JSwan, that was too much! Hilarious!!
    A Merrick N Dream Farm
    Proud Member of "Someone Special to me serves in the Military" Clique

    Comment


    • #22
      Originally posted by JSwan View Post
      The answer to your question is that I have not found anything that will keep Chucky from not acting according to his nature. I bet he'd be one heck of a fighting cock.
      Write a book about him and let him finance your retirement - and THEN cook him !
      ... _. ._ .._. .._

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #23
        Well JSwan, you'll savor that meal eh??!! Mine aren't that bad - yet.

        Mine are 6 months old and are due to add another couple pounds on them. I can picture one of mine being as evil as yours. "Tyson" does some of the same things as Chucky. He stalks, innocently pecks, and if you blink he's ruffling those feathers and shaking.

        My new thing this weekend was to go after him before he came after me. So far so good but it won't last. He's outta here and his friend may go with him. I hate to leave my hens unattended by a rooster but after watching him ravage a couple of my hens last night they may be thanking me.

        One thing I have going for me is he's away from my house. I'm grateful for my double & triple fencing right now that's for sure. Let's just say I try to keep a horse between him and me - or carry a stick. Such fun.
        "Concern for animals is a matter of taking the side of the weak against the strong, something the best people have always done." Harriet Beecher Stowe 1811-1896

        Ponies are cool!

        Comment


        • #24
          Originally posted by equinelaundry View Post
          Let's just say I try to keep a horse between him and me - or carry a stick. Such fun.

          Try a tennis racket. I've got quite a collection of weapons propped against buildings and machinery around here. The most effective and satisfying one is the tennis racket. My backhand could use some work but my serve and forehand are faaaahhhbulous.

          I used to call him Cato - because I resembled Inspector Clouseau (in more ways than one), wandering around his house waiting for his servant Cato to pounce on him from behind a door. The mayhem, slow motion karate chops and sound effects, the running around and hiding and coming around from behind... yup. Right out of an old Pink Panther movie.

          But the pitter patter of little feet and the evil intent and diminutive size is more apropos of Chucky. The hens are Brides of Chucky.

          The guy that helped us butcher last fall mentioned that his brother had an evil rooster that needed to go in the pot - but he was looking for a nice rooster. I gave him one of my Australorps and last I heard, that rooster was screwing his brains out and gentle as a lamb. Lucky bird.

          I'm expecting 50 chicks sometime next week and some of them are Australorps. I order straight run so I'm sure I'll have plenty of nice roos to choose from.

          Good luck with your roosters - you'll need it! Seems like everyone I encounter has either an evil rooster story or an evil goat story - lots of traumatized people out there.
          Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
          Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
          -Rudyard Kipling

          Comment


          • #25
            Dude, what are these things good for? I'm sure God or Chuck Darwin had a reason for inventing them.

            Before you put a mean, extraneous rooster in a pot, I suggest you feed him up as you would a steer you would butcher. The least he could do is taste good on the way out!

            A little "artificial selection" could be practiced. Why not preserve the mellow rooster who keeps the girls in line rather than a mean one?
            The armchair saddler
            Politically Pro-Cat

            Comment


            • #26
              I am laughing remembering an incident with my former BO's rooster. This guy came from some really gentle stock, and had never bothered ANYONE.
              Well, that is, until the hooker boots. (JSwan, I am not going to beat your story, but I had to throw that in there!)
              Part of my evening feed routine was to throw the chickens some feed and lock them in for the night.
              It had been raining, and I knew that running shoes would be soggy pretty quick. So, I wore my hooker boots.
              These were actually bright yellow rubber ankle boots, which my BO thought would be well suited to a lady of the evening.
              Not being Aunt Esther, I ignored her opinion. What a mistake.
              I was trundling over to the henhouse, bucket of grain in one hand and a bucket of water in another, followed by clucking hens, when I let out language worthy of a hooker at the sudden and unexpected pain of an attacking rooster - and yes, I was wearing shorts at the time.
              I am quite certain that the image of my Rubenesque self, in my hooker boots, chasing a rooster 'round a pond has been burned into the brain of my former BO.
              Know what? He never offered to attack anybody before or since....it was the boots!
              Dee
              (PS - around here, some people use screw-on electrial connectors to cover the spurs on roosters - not sure how humane that is, but it seems to be a local custom)
              Founder of the I LOFF my worrywart TB clique!
              Official member of the "I Sing Silly Songs to My Animals!" Clique
              http://wilddiamondintherough.blogspot.ca/

              Comment


              • #27
                These stories are great. We have a Rhode Island Red rooster that is getting cockier by the day. He's just over 1 yr. DH and I have both booted him across the yard because of his antics. They are back stabbing, rotten, good for nothing but stew IMO. The other day DH let the flock of 15 out and that dang thing started jumping on every hen out there. Poor girls are featherless on their backs now. So DH grabed him by his scrony neck and heaved him. He left them alone the rest of the day. And he came after me when I was putting water in their pen. I stuck up my boot at him and he fluffed himself making himself look oh so tuff and macho. That was until I stepped back, grabed out chicken stick, I wacked him and sent him flying into the lawn mower and off he went. You really can't hurt those buggers. Not that we are trying, we are only trying to protect ourselves.

                Has anyone used the potato method of spur removal? We are thinking of trying that but have never done it before.
                R.I.P Vanny 26 yr QH Stallion 4/11/82 - 5/8/08, Scout 28 yr Paint Cross Gelding, Glistening 11 yr Arab/Saddlebred Mare

                Comment


                • #28
                  I LOVE all these stories!

                  The electrical connector idea is really interesting. Heard about the potato thing on this BB but haven't tried it.

                  I'm a little askeert of ticking Chucky off. If I tried anything it would have to be at night.

                  At this very second he's at the back door, crowing. I don't need a Star Trek universal translator to understand what he's saying.

                  There is this really funny site I like to link to when a "mean goat" story is posted. It's http://www.goat-trauma.org/

                  We need a site for victims of evil roosters! That would be a hoot. We could have a photo gallery of all the rooster weapons people have had to use. Tennis rackets, hooker boots, potatoes, electrical connectors..... buckets... and photos of the evil roosters - like a 10 Most Wanted list, listing breeds by their "evil rooster" factor.

                  There could be a sub category of "evil geese or evil ducks". No doubt there are goose and duck victims, too. I've got a photo of an evil African goose that used to attack me at my old boarding barn. Usually he goosed us when we were bent over cleaning hooves.

                  One day I was taking photos and had crouched down to take a photo of two pot-bellied pigs snoozing. I sensed something behind me and whirled around and took a photo. It came out perfectly and captured that goose racing towards me with his neck down and straight out - ready to goose me.

                  I loved that goose - he was a trip.
                  Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                  Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                  -Rudyard Kipling

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Originally posted by JSwan View Post

                    I put that mower in 6th gear and revved it - yelling - YOU UNGRATEFUL *!(*#)!!*&# I brought you into this world and I can take you out!!!!!!!!

                    And he hopped out of the way at the last second. I turned my head to see if he was going to attack me from behind and I ran right into the laundry line.

                    Not sure who won that particular battle but only one of us emerged with our dignity intact.

                    My most recent bright idea was to wear a halloween mask on the back of my head so he thinks I'm looking at him when my back is turned. Like what people do in tiger country. I have no self-respect left.

                    Thank you, JSwan. What a wonderful mental picture - only now I'm going to be cracking up all day when I think of it.
                    Y'know, you really should publish a story collection.
                    I'm not ignoring the rules. I'm interpreting the rules. Tamal, The Great British Baking Show

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      This is great! I recently moved my horse to a working farm complete with cows, chickens, and even a goat and donkey. We have the Rhode Island Reds for egg laying and an assortment of freebie roosters. Fortunately I haven't had problems with them attacking me. There are two big white chickens, all I know is they're the kind you eat. Lulu is the hen and she is the sweetest chicken around, loves to be petted and will watch me clean my stall and cock her head when I talk to her. Her buddy, yet to be named, is a rooster and has pecked a couple people but lets me pet him and pick him up when it's time to go in for the night. Hopefully he stays docile, otherwise he'll be a tasty meal I'm sure. Never knew chickens were so much fun!
                      "Beware the hobby that eats."
                      Benjamin Franklin

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        Originally posted by JSwan View Post
                        Chucky is getting on my last nerve.

                        I know what the answer is. It's chicken and dumplings.

                        But my neighbor did the same to his evil rooster and then lost his flock soon after. Whatever his faults - that rooster keeps the hens together and near or under shelter - and always patrols when they're out in the open.

                        I really and truly do love animals, but I tell you plain - that rooster may be the most evil animal I have ever known.

                        It's one thing to have a fit of temper or be a bit protective - quite another to lie in wait and beat the crap out of a person when his back is turned.

                        I swear on the Bible this is what happens.

                        I open the back door and off in the distance I see a head pop up. I start putting up laundry, or maybe fill the water bowl... only to turn around to see that SOB has raced about 200 feet towards me. Fast little bas**rd.

                        As soon as he sees me, he freezes. Then he starts pecking the ground perfectly innocently.

                        Turn my back - and I hear pitter patter pitter patter - turn around - Chucky freezes about 10 feet from me.

                        I warn him to keep away from me - and he flares his neck feathers, puts his head down - and attacks.

                        Out comes my tennis racket. Ffffwwwwiiiing... and Chucky is booted away, unhurt.

                        SOB comes back for more - this time he flies up in the air with talons towards me.
                        Fwwwwwiiing - I score another point.

                        Chucky gives me the evil eye and walks away.

                        That only lasts a few minutes, though. He's right back at it as soon as I turn my back, and God forbid I try and bend over. He weighs about 10-12 pounds - and when he hits you it really does hurt and bruise - especially if he spurs you.

                        Yesterday I cut the grass in the back yard and the SOB ran over and stood right in front of the mower. Can you believe that? I mean he just purposefully walked over and STOOD in the path of the mower.

                        Well... I stopped the mower and idled it - sitting there waiting for him to move out of the way.

                        Nope - he wanted ME to move out of the way. Then he flared his neck feathers and got ready to charge.

                        I put that mower in 6th gear and revved it - yelling - YOU UNGRATEFUL *!(*#)!!*&# I brought you into this world and I can take you out!!!!!!!!

                        And he hopped out of the way at the last second. I turned my head to see if he was going to attack me from behind and I ran right into the laundry line.

                        Not sure who won that particular battle but only one of us emerged with our dignity intact.

                        My most recent bright idea was to wear a halloween mask on the back of my head so he thinks I'm looking at him when my back is turned. Like what people do in tiger country. I have no self-respect left.



                        The answer to your question is that I have not found anything that will keep Chucky from not acting according to his nature. I bet he'd be one heck of a fighting cock.

                        He's going in the pot soon. Unless one of y'all have a better idea. For what it's worth - I did not handraise this flock and do not treat them like little feather children. My hens are nice and henlike - and the rooster is just acting like a rooster. He was supposed to be a Speckled Sussex... but the order got screwed up and he's either a RIR or maybe a Welsummer. Looks like RIR to me. Sure as he** acts like one.
                        I'm sorry, but this is the #1 funniest post that I have read in a very VERY long time! Thanks so much for the giggles!
                        Katie Ruppel & Yellow Rose Eventing *Website* & *Facebook*
                        Email for Questions/Clinics/Sponsorship

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          When I was 4 we had a mean RIR rooster that my mom named Brockford Crockard. We ate him.

                          When I had loose chickens I noticed that in the rooster dominance fights the winner would chase the looser around until he was squawking, running with his head lowered and wings flapping (he looked absolutely terrified), looking for a place to hide. So when one of my lovely boys approached me aggressively I chased him for awhile after I got the terrified-and-looking-for-a-place-to hide-run from him. I usually didn't have any trouble with them after that. Sometimes they needed a refresher coarse and I was happy to oblige them.
                          If I just chased them away for a little ways (running away with their heads up) they always came back at me.

                          You can use a dremmel to grind down sharp spurs, or use large dog guillotine nippers. They have a quick like dog nails so if you cut too much off they bleed. It's a minor wound as compared to decapitation.

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            J Swan -- do you have a past history in advertising as a copy writer? I'm one and I swear if you are not copy writing as a career, you should be.

                            I've never been so "hooked" on a thread about a freaking rooster...laughing all the way.
                            www.littlebullrun@aol.com See Little Bull Run's stallions at:
                            "Argosy" - YouTube and "Boleem" - YouTube
                            Boleem @ 1993 National Dressage Symposium - YouTube

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              Originally posted by Sentry Chick View Post
                              These stories are great. We have a Rhode Island Red rooster that is getting cockier by the day. He's just over 1 yr. DH and I have both booted him across the yard because of his antics. They are back stabbing, rotten, good for nothing but stew IMO. The other day DH let the flock of 15 out and that dang thing started jumping on every hen out there. Poor girls are featherless on their backs now. So DH grabed him by his scrony neck and heaved him. He left them alone the rest of the day. And he came after me when I was putting water in their pen. I stuck up my boot at him and he fluffed himself making himself look oh so tuff and macho. That was until I stepped back, grabed out chicken stick, I wacked him and sent him flying into the lawn mower and off he went. You really can't hurt those buggers. Not that we are trying, we are only trying to protect ourselves.

                              Has anyone used the potato method of spur removal? We are thinking of trying that but have never done it before.
                              My neighbor down the road uses that method on some. On others, they literally just twist off the spurs with plyers. Only "pop" and "cicle" didn't live long enough to have to have spur removal. They went into the freezer. Anyway, none of her roosters that are currently running around are any worse for the wear. In fact they don't seem to be phased by the whole process.
                              "Sometimes you just have to shut up and color."

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                I have had chickens for 40 years, so have had my share of nasty roosters. Actually has one super monster, and most of the others were nice.

                                Last rooster I had, started to do the aggressive dance with me. WHat I learned was if I ignored him, and skirted around him rather than confront him, it would not entice him to come at me.

                                When you kick back, do anything in return to their nasty behavior, you are actually encouraging them to attack.

                                So, with this rooster, we took the retreat quietly approach and after a month or even less, he grew disinterested in attacking humans.
                                save lives...spay/neuter/geld

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  fivehorses

                                  This is what I was told as well. Don't fight back. With my mille fleur I ignored him b/c he was so little. He started to size up a 3 yr old little boy and well...that wasn't cool. I'd catch him, flip him upside down and carry him around like a football. Finally had to "place" him with a guy who wanted him for breeding. I've had to resort to a trashcan lid for some other evil roos my friend "had" as I literally felt like I walked onto the set of Jurassic Park and they were the velociraptors.
                                  "Sometimes you just have to shut up and color."

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    Just be glad you don't have sheep.


                                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kdF_B...eature=related

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      Originally posted by sid View Post
                                      J Swan -- do you have a past history in advertising as a copy writer? I'm one and I swear if you are not copy writing as a career, you should be.

                                      I've never been so "hooked" on a thread about a freaking rooster...laughing all the way.

                                      No - but I did do a lot of writing and speaking; mostly technical/legal/development type stuff. Haven't done any of that in years except for some volunteer work.

                                      Yesterday my vet came to give one of my horse his IV tet shot and he noticed the tennis racket laying on top of the trash can.

                                      He asked, "Do you play tennis?"

                                      I replied, "Hmmmm, more like badminton."


                                      Leather - no sheep! My butt is too big a target!

                                      Equinelaundry - I bet you're having fun and I hope your garden is flourishing.
                                      Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                                      Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                                      -Rudyard Kipling

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        Originally posted by fivehorses View Post
                                        Last rooster I had, started to do the aggressive dance with me. WHat I learned was if I ignored him, and skirted around him rather than confront him, it would not entice him to come at me.

                                        When you kick back, do anything in return to their nasty behavior, you are actually encouraging them to attack.

                                        So, with this rooster, we took the retreat quietly approach and after a month or even less, he grew disinterested in attacking humans.
                                        Yeah, we tried doing that and putting it simple, it did not work cause whether you were backing away or going around him, he still comes running after you aggresivley and tries to jump on you.

                                        And it's not just his spurs that get you, it's his nails too. Is that what you call them, nails? Or claws? Anyways, I'm not gonna be the one trying to clip, trim or remove them, that is all up to DH. I have no patience for that. LOL.
                                        R.I.P Vanny 26 yr QH Stallion 4/11/82 - 5/8/08, Scout 28 yr Paint Cross Gelding, Glistening 11 yr Arab/Saddlebred Mare

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          Got to say that rooster tennis racket story is the funniest thing Ive read in a while. Sure put a smile on my face.

                                          I sure can relate to the ram video. I lived with that for a very long time, it seemed like forever. He was born in my barn, the cutest little thing ever. He was a Dorset ram. He didn't stay sweet for long. I truly believe the animal really hated me, the only one who ever has.

                                          He would ram my car just like the one in the video here. I had a Pinto wagon at the time. It had ram jams the whole way down both sides. He hated me so much he would follow me around the trailer from the outside and ram the side of it. We lived in a trailer on my in laws farm. IT was about 500 yards to their house cross lot, and about 1/4 mile to my mailbox down the drive. If I could time it so the sheep were grazing up back, as they did each afternoon ,I could usually sneak down to hte mailbox unnoticed. But many times he would notice me once I was down there, and that was painful. He would charge right down there and just start pounding me, he'd get me down, I would try to get up but he'd just knock me right back down. Eventually someone would hear me and come to my rescue. But this was far from pleasant. It is still very clear 30 yrs later.

                                          I would have to back the car up to the steps of the trailer and open the hatchbackk to get the kids safely in the car.Then he would ram jam the car the whole way down the driveway and usually just past the inlaws drive, a long way. But he only bothered the kids if they were with me. He never bothered them while they were out playing, not even once. He left them right alone. I never once did anything to that sheep, he had no reason to hate me, I swear, but he sure did. One time I had almost made it back inside, I was on the steps. He rammed the steps and they pulled right away from the trailer and both the steps and me went rolling down lawn and he then pounded me.

                                          I thought I'd be smart and I tied him to a farm implement on a swivel. That did not do any good and in the long run made things worse. Yup, for a few weeks he did not get me, but soon, he developed massive shoulders and ran with that piece of iron as well as he did before. Obviously he couldn't be let to run around with a hunk of machine so husband let him loose again. Now husband really liked this ram. I think he found it grand that this was something that had some kind of control over me. He had always tried to and never got anywhere with that. The ram broke his leg and hubby spent hundreds of dollars getting his leg casted and changed and all that. And these ppl were old fashioned farmers who did their own vet work or there was none at all. Sick cows did not get a vet, more often a bullet. Things sure changed on that when we took the farm over.

                                          Finally it got so he was going after the milk pick up guy too and so then the inlaws said he had to go or stay tied. Well, this last tie was the end, he somehow got tangled around a wheel and broke his neck. He was not cared for by me so I don't know the exacts. I do know that even after his death had happened by a yr he again came back to haunt me. The dogs dragged him back into the yard bone by bone. Apparently FIL had not taken him but only down over the bank behind the barn. I knew it was him for sure when I finally was brought the leg bone that had healed. You could sure tell where the fracture was from the thickening of hte healed bone. I still have that here somewhere, all these yrs later along with one of his curly horns. That bastard was one mean sheep.

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X