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Slant Horse Trailer. Human error.

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  • #21
    One can hope in the future you will get out, go around and look into the trailer to see what the horses are doing. Better yet, install a two way video camera, that is what my husband did for me so I can look up and see what my mare is doing should she move or shift. Even with that, if we are at a light I know I can jump out and look, I do so, I am not lazy and just assume everything is fine. You know what assuming does, makes an ass out of you.

    So in the future, learn from this mistake and be more vigilant and look out for your horses in the trailer first and fore most. It could of been much worse for your mare and tie them secure enough that neither can get their head around to bite one another.

    Comment


    • #22
      Originally posted by Gestalt View Post
      OP,
      My goodness some people are ranters! Do you really need to "blast" the OP? How about some gentle guidance and information?

      Gentle? Like what happened to the horses in the trailer? Like what could have happened beyond this? This is a supposedly experienced "expert" horse person. She's brags about being a top dressage judge. I wouldn't mind if she was appologetic and horrified, as she should be, but she starts the thread blaming it on the slant load and. I am apalled. I am so anxious about what could have happend. With three times the dilligence she showed I have seen horses critically injured. I guess what apalled me most was the "gee" and "I never thought" and "it never occured to me". It bloody well should have occured to her, and she should have thought, and she was too lazy to check on them when she heard them banging around back there. Taking horses on the highways is risky and requires a thinking mind. This person by her own description handn't bought into the mindset of trailing diligence.

      A rant? It was a description of what could have happend, and what a negligent horse owner she was on this occasion. How does "gentle" fit into what happened to her horses because she was in some other zone than the one where her horses would have been protected?

      I leave it to you, Gestalt, to be gentle. Me? Not so much. And if it was my horse she was hauling, she would have had an even less gentle reaction from me, if she had blithely confessed she hadn't checked on them for 3 hourse during stop and go traffic. This reaction is for her own horses.
      Airborne? Oh. Yes, he can take a joke. Once. After that, the joke's on you.

      Comment


      • #23
        There is no emergency real or imagined that trumps pulling out of the flow of traffic--at the LEAST to a wide highway shoulder. Preferably off the main thoroughfare altogether.

        High-handed crap like stopping a rig to exit into Interstate or Highway traffic to open a door on a trailer hauling restless-perhaps distressed horses will get folks (2 & 4 footed) killed.
        To have a right to do a thing is not at all the same as to be right in doing it. - GK Chesterton

        Comment


        • #24
          ok, ok Anotherround - bit over the top aren't you? Time to chill a little.
          Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique

          Comment


          • #25
            Got to say that I'm with AR.

            Seems to me that common sense isn't so common any more. Personally speaking if I'd done what the OP did I'd be gutted and mortiphied. I'd be so utterly and totally ashamed that for sure I'd not be telling the whole of cyberspace but then it takes all sorts.

            Gentle guidance:

            Next time you transport your horse ensure its in a trailer that is fit for purpose. Doesn't have missing bars. Doesn't allow a horse to be injured. Has good partitions to keep them in nice and safe and sure and separated. Ensure the horses are fully booted and suited. Plan and prepare for the duration of your journey and never assume that a short journey requires less planning a preparation. Don't go thinking sh** doesn't happen because it's only a short way. Have such as a viewing window or security video camera set up so you can see to check on the horses in the back if they're in a trailer rather than a truck. If you get stuck in standing traffic then ensure you check up on them. (see previous sentence! You don't have to stop if you have a video camera) Don't presume it's normal for a horse to be stomping and kicking persistently and particularly when you can't see them at all.

            Don't be surprised if you don't follow any of the above and discover at the end of a journey that there's something gone wrong.

            Comment


            • #26
              Agreed Thomas and AR.. WHOLEHEARTEDLY..

              WHERE IS THE COMMON SENSE!!

              YOU DIDN'T CHECK ON YOUR HORSES FOR THREE HOURS IN STOP-START TRAFFIC.

              *shakes head*

              There is no excuse and the OP deserves to be blasted for their own sheer ignorance.

              Comment


              • #27
                Originally posted by pony grandma View Post
                . . . . Long waits standing and stomping, pawing, possibly bucking and rocking the trailer -- maybe you're in an accident and have to unload along side a busy road. Just so easy to keep a couple of syringes loaded and in a container under your seat. I label them to prevent misinterpretation, at best.
                I would be very cautious about following that advice, depending on the states you will be traveling through. For example, in New York State you must have a PRESCRIPTION for each & every needle in your possession. Regardless of circumstances, you cannot just have drugs with you, or needles, or syringes. I don't know if any other state is a stringent but you need to know the law.

                Comment


                • #28
                  Interesting. I recently heard of a similar situation. I *very* experienced horseman, many, many trailering miles under his belt, and not even a stopped-on-the-road situation, just a long trip. One young horse just got very clever, in a way that one wouldn't expect, and his traveling partner ended up with nips all over his neck and shoulder.

                  Horses do strange things. Hope your mare is feeling better. I bet she will forgive you, but I wouldn't put her back in the trailer with that same youngster!
                  "One person's cowboy is another person's blooming idiot" -- katarine

                  Spay and neuter. Please.

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    It's very sad that your horse suffered this way but, come on, this is an owner error, not a slant problem.

                    Mistakes are made by well intentioned people and that is very sad and a good warning to all but let's not blame the trailer or the young horse who was just being a horse.

                    I do hope your mare is OK and that she beats the crap out of that little boy for being so disrespectful!! :-)
                    I am sorry if this seems like a pile on but I am only replying because of ignorant responses like the quote above.

                    Good God. Yeah, it's the trailer's fault, no wait, it's the horse's fault for being a horse! it can't be the human's fault because then they would feel too sad.

                    This is about human error. Period. I feel very sorry for the mare who lived through torture that she could not escape . We all make mistakes. Own up , make others aware and stop trying to blame the trailer or the young horse.

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                    • #30
                      ^ Excellent posting

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                      • #31
                        Mistakes are made by well intentioned people and that is very sad and a good warning to all but let's not blame the trailer or the young horse who was just being a horse. ... This is about human error. Period. I feel very sorry for the mare who lived through torture that she could not escape. We all make mistakes. Own up, make others aware and stop trying to blame the trailer or the young horse.
                        Excellent advice.
                        I'm not arguing, I'm just explaining why I'm right
                        Violence doesn't end violence. It extends it. Break the cycle.

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                        • #32
                          Talking about slant trailers, a friend has a three horse and has bolted a trailer rubber mat to each one of the partitions, so there is a barrier between horses all the way down, although it is not a stiff barrier.
                          Works great with kickers or the odd horse that may scramble if he has to move over sharply or brake fast.

                          Comment


                          • #33
                            I'm curious how a horse properly tied in the trailer could get his head in a position to bite another horses belly.
                            Sarchasm: The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.

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                            • #34
                              I wholeheartedly argee with AR, Thomas and egontoast. Also, the divider with a broken bar, what if a horse would have gotten their head through there, slipped, fell and could have hung themselves in the trailer!


                              Originally posted by Bluey View Post
                              Talking about slant trailers, a friend has a three horse and has bolted a trailer rubber mat to each one of the partitions, so there is a barrier between horses all the way down, although it is not a stiff barrier.
                              Works great with kickers or the odd horse that may scramble if he has to move over sharply or brake fast.
                              We just bought a trailer and added this option.

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                Originally posted by Bluey View Post
                                Talking about slant trailers, a friend has a three horse and has bolted a trailer rubber mat to each one of the partitions, so there is a barrier between horses all the way down, although it is not a stiff barrier.
                                Works great with kickers or the odd horse that may scramble if he has to move over sharply or brake fast.
                                That is a great idea. I am not sure why the trailer makers don't have it. Not solid like a stud divider-just protection.

                                On the stopping and checking in stop and go traffic-it is difficult. The OPs case is different and to blame it on a slant is not right. My mare got bit in pasture-not going to blame it on pasture. But I used to live in Los Angeles and when I went out camping -some times out of state, came back on a 8-10 hr trip. Coming back and you hit L.A traffic-it is tough with a rig. Just the stop-go , merging freeways, freeways merging into the high speed lane of other freeways, steep grades with stop and go downhill, vehicles cutting you off. Just crazy. Also once you hit urban areas, sometimes it is difficult to pull off the freeway and check-some exits there don't have an entry back into the freeway and to go around looking for an entry back into the freeway when you don't know your way and are hauling horses in city streets is not pleasant.

                                I take precautions, make sure everything is in working order. I also try and work around rush hour traffic-on long trips it is difficult. I was coming back from AZ once and got caught in howling blowing winds on I10 and had to come a good stretch at about 40mph or so. It slowed me down and I hit L.A. just in time for rush hour. But, I am only a trail rider. So in my 3h , rarely have I hauled 3 horses. So if I don't know the horse, I always separate them by a stall-so they can't reach each other. It is just very rare, I end up hauling 3.

                                On the OP, I am not sure I still get it. If it is a slant, the slots are pretty narrow, so just wondering how the gelding even turned around to bite the mare's belly . Either he put his head down below and reached over or it was a 3h or a 4h with the last stall that is really big?Just trying to figure how it happened?

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #36
                                  I can’t see some of the posts here since those uses are on my “ignore” list, but I can imagine they are happy to shred me apart and write all kind of lies and libel about me. Nothing new, this is what they live for.

                                  I wasn’t the one who was driving that trailer, trailer wasn’t mine either, don’t know what make her trailer is. I paid a professional to give my mare a ride in her trailer with her youngster since we were going to the same place. She is excellent with trailering. We trailered together our horses before just fine.

                                  We did check on them, both were tied up and looked just fine. Some of the California's freeways do not even have a shoulder, but only 6 lanes of traffic. With the whole freeway closed b/c of fatal drive by shooting of the local rap artist, it was a hectic situation. To unload them was out of the question.

                                  I feel horrible for what I put my mare thru. I don’t think that any “kudos” will erase that guilt that I have and will continue to have for overlooking that situation.

                                  But I hope that others can learn on my mistake and prevent their horses from being bitten/nibbled on. I didn’t notice that the bar was missing and didn’t measure the length of the trailer ties that were just a store bough trailer ties with the safety snap. The shorter tie and the solid divider would off helped.
                                  So look closely at your horses sides (shoulders, bellies) for a very small penny to quarter sized bites/nibbles. You can not see them ASAP, since they do not swell up right away and everything looks just normal. But when they do swell up it's easy to notice them. There is no guarantee that you can see those nibbles from the window, since it can be dark in the trailer when you are heading back home after a day of riding. Still the best thing to do is to have a solid divider and short enough trailer tie.
                                  Last edited by Dressage Art; Mar. 14, 2009, 11:29 AM.

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    Originally posted by Evalee Hunter View Post
                                    I would be very cautious about following that advice, depending on the states you will be traveling through. For example, in New York State you must have a PRESCRIPTION for each & every needle in your possession. Regardless of circumstances, you cannot just have drugs with you, or needles, or syringes. I don't know if any other state is a stringent but you need to know the law.
                                    I didn't know that. I live in the rural midwest and I look up the transport laws under the agriculture dept. of each state I drive thru. And I never knew that, but then I've not been to NY, with horses, either.

                                    I had a friend have a truck breakdown and she was stranded on the side of a very busy 4 lane highway for several hours until help could reach her. The horses got upset with all of the big truck traffic whizzing by, shaking the trailer each time they passed. She tranqed them and they stood quiet while they waited. I helped her unload them, with flashlights, it was pitch dark by then, and get them into my trailer that I had brought to help. She probably wished that she had some human medicinal for the kids that she had with her. It was a long anxious wait for me to get there.

                                    Some of my worse case trailering problems have come when the trailer is standing still. Regardless, as spoken here, take nothing for granted, viligence is the precaution.
                                    Don't let anyone tell you that your ideas or dreams are foolish. There is a millionaire walking around who invented the pool noodle.

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      DA,
                                      Sorry about your mare. It was an accident and you were just coming on here to share your story to help others avoid what you went through.

                                      And more sorry about all the bashing on here by a certain group I recognize from another board.
                                      If we were all soooo perfect..
                                      MnToBe Twinkle Star: "Twinkie"
                                      http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/f...wo/009_17A.jpg

                                      Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        I'm gratified that you explained that this wasn't your rig and you weren't driving. However, you were in the truck with the hauler, right? You could feel the rig moving about, right? I understand that maneuvering a rig in heavy traffic is tough, but I'd do whatever it took to check on my horses if I heard or felt commotion in the trailer.

                                        So don't be so defensive when someone rightly points out an oversight. Learn from the experience and move on. Hope your mare feels better.

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          Originally Posted by Bluey
                                          Talking about slant trailers, a friend has a three horse and has bolted a trailer rubber mat to each one of the partitions, so there is a barrier between horses all the way down, although it is not a stiff barrier.
                                          Works great with kickers or the odd horse that may scramble if he has to move over sharply or brake fast.
                                          That's the way they always are over here.

                                          Comment

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