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how to get rid of honey bees in barn

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  • how to get rid of honey bees in barn

    Any suggestions?
    I see where they are going in and out ... corner of run-in that shares wall with hay barn. But they could be anywhere in the wall...right?
    Barn is circa 1800 or older so I can be reconstructing anything.
    I have a VERY inquisitive horse that I know will get his nose into trouble if I don't get rid of them.

  • #2
    can you seal up cracks where they are going in/out? and/or cover with plywood?
    Nothing says "I love you" like a tractor. (Clydejumper)

    The reports states, “Elizabeth reported that she accidently put down this pony, ........, at the show.”

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    • #3
      Well, one option might be to dig through your phone book and find a bee keeper to see if they can locate and transfer the hive.

      But I'm not that eco friendly....I don't want bees, hornets or wasps in the barn. I had a ground nest in my old barn when I first started leasing it and here's what I did.

      At sundown when most are home for the night....

      1) Put on several layers of LIGHT COLORED (WHITE) clothing (less likely to get stung through and white is better. Black is bad)

      2) Get a fogger so you can get in there and subdue them a bit. Fog.

      3) Using a bee/wasp insecticide, spray liberally.

      4) Run like hell.

      5) Inspect the next a.m. If still a lot of activity, repeat. Else, plug up hole.


      The run like hell part is really really important.

      When I did it, I called my mom first (who lives 3 states away) to inform her of what I was about to do and to give her the addy so she could call 911 if she didn't hear back within 30 min. (I'm allergic) Then I did the deed, ran like hell, and called mom back. Crisis averted, ground hornets dead.

      But if you're eco friendly and they really are honey bees, you may be able to get someone to come and relocate them.
      A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

      Might be a reason, never an excuse...

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      • #4
        Please, if they really are honey bees, find a beekeeper to remove them for you. There is some kind of "plague" going through domestic bee colonies, so bee keepers will probably be glad to have there.

        Of course, if they are wasps or hornets, kill the darn things dead.
        If you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor.
        Desmond Tutu

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Louise View Post
          Please, if they really are honey bees, find a beekeeper to remove them for you. There is some kind of "plague" going through domestic bee colonies, so bee keepers will probably be glad to have there.

          Of course, if they are wasps or hornets, kill the darn things dead.
          Yes, absolutely! Actual real-live honeybees are literally becoming an endangered species here in the US-- please have them confirmed and moved by a beekeeper.

          And, yeah, if they're other stinging bastards, well the heck with them!

          Comment


          • #6
            Yes, find a local beekeeper, they should gladly take them for you if they can.

            Comment


            • #7
              Your extension agent may be able to refer you to an apiarist. There may be a few in your area, especially if there are any orchards or herb farms anywhere nearby. Orchard owners sometimes rent honeybees to help pollinate.

              Try and identify the bees (safely)

              If they are native mason bees - they are harmless little things and rarely sting.
              Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
              Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
              -Rudyard Kipling

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              • #8
                Ditto. We are losing our honey bees and they are critical to so many crops and ecologies.

                Originally posted by Louise View Post
                Please, if they really are honey bees, find a beekeeper to remove them for you. There is some kind of "plague" going through domestic bee colonies, so bee keepers will probably be glad to have there.

                Of course, if they are wasps or hornets, kill the darn things dead.
                Mary Lou
                http://www.homeagainfarm.com

                https://www.facebook.com/HomeAgainFarmHanoverians

                Member OMGiH I loff my mares clique

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                • #9
                  Save the Bees!

                  If they are honey bees, you just call a beekeeper, call your county ag extension agent for names, and he/she will come out and smoke them out and take them away.

                  There is a parasite killing all the honey bees in the USA.

                  Don't kill them when someone will come get them FREE of charge.

                  Oops people have already told you this.

                  And the parasites that eat the bees is a mite or something like that.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If they are honey bees, as others have said, you need to get them moved. They actually are on the endangered list and you are not allowed to kill them - don't ask me how I know

                    A "bee" man (usually bug man but one with an expertise in bees ) will be able to locate the queen, remove her, and the rest will follow
                    Lord Stanely, Lord Stanley - come back to Pittsburgh!!!
                    http://www.chronicleofmyhorse.com/profile/2_tbs
                    *** I LOVE PUIKA FAN CLUB***

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                    • #11
                      Everybody here is correct in a general sense. Beekeepers come collect swarms all the time.
                      But if you have them living (a hive) in your wall then it does get problematic because the structure has to be dismantled to get them out, all traces of the hive have to be removed and the area put back and throughly sealed (or they tend to come back). You will likely have to pay for the reconstruction unless you know a good carpenter.
                      If you poison them the hive contents will still be in the wall and a new batch will find it and move in, or if you seal it up then you may have rotting honey (granted honey keeps quite well) and melting wax in your wall at some future time. And ants. Or not.

                      You could call the state apiarist for the beekeping club/association in your area, or sometimes if there is a farm supply store that sells beekeeping supplies they will know, and then the group usually keeps a list of members who do swarm and hive removals. One of those guys will likely have some suggestions that will work for you, but they may charge to come out and look. Depends on the area. Good luck and I hope you find a way to let them stay in the wall and keep Mr Nosy from getting stung.
                      Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
                      Incredible Invisible

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                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        I KNEW IT!!! (as soon as I submitted, i thought...you know I'm gonna get all of these "don't kill the bees" answers!)
                        I just wanted an answer, not the ECO friendly one.
                        WE ARE ECO friendly, I just don't want them in the barn...we have bee hives on the 500 farm, there is a huge orchard on the farm, the farm is on permanent conservation easement...yada yada yada...i just didn't feel like including all of this peripheral info. Just wanted an answer to get RID of the bees in the old barn that cannot be tampered with...bees can an do live everywhere else on the 500 acres...just need this small area to be as "bee-free possible!!!!

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                        • #13
                          Sorry you do not what to hear it but the best way to get rid of them is to get a bee keeper in and have him take them out as if you just kill them more will move back in but a bee keeper will know how to make it so they will not come back.

                          you could go and get cans and cans of spray but you will have bees back soon!
                          AilleXWest
                          www.gypsystoychest.com Adult Toys and Home partys

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                          • #14
                            OK - for the non-bee friendly advice....

                            We had bees last year three times at our house. We joked that all the bees fleeing other states were coming to our house Two times I called a beekeeper and both times he killed them. And charged me $200 each time. He did get a swarm from my neighbors tree. And charged her $200 but at least he saved the bees. They just can't get them when they're tucked up into hard to reach places. So the third time I killed them myself I tried a lot of sprays, etc but what worked was sevin dust. If you can get the dust up where they are going into your barn, they will track it into the queen and all will die. I used a long pole with a spoon on the end to sprinkle the sevin into the crevice where the bees were exiting my house. Do it when the bees aren't too active, I think I did it late afternoon and they didn't bother me. Then when they're gone, you have to seal up where they had the hive or more bees will come later (ask me how I know - that's how we got the third swarm of bees).

                            Sorry bee lovers I hated to kill them but they were swarming right outside my back door.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Rebmik View Post
                              I KNEW IT!!! (as soon as I submitted, i thought...you know I'm gonna get all of these "don't kill the bees" answers!)
                              Wow. I didn't realize NO ONE gave advice on how to get rid of them

                              The only way to get rid of them is to kill them or get a bee person out to deal with moving them - no other options, sorry.

                              And truthfully you are NOT allowed to kill honey bees. If anyone found out you could get in trouble - what kind I'm not sure but I know we had to go through some serious research to get rid of the massive amounts of bees in my house 2 summers ago. Found out my bees were your average run of the mill hornets so we killed them. I did feel bad but when I couldn't walk in my basement without being swarmed I knew they had to go. It would've been a ton of work/money to get the bees out by moving the queen based on where the hive was so we killed them then cleaned out as much of the hive as possible.

                              No one was really being eco-friendly but rather telling you the truth. You asked a question and got the answer. Instead of getting mad about the answers you didn't want to hear, maybe you should be thankful anyone bothered to respond then ask a more specific question in hopes of getting a more suitable answer
                              Lord Stanely, Lord Stanley - come back to Pittsburgh!!!
                              http://www.chronicleofmyhorse.com/profile/2_tbs
                              *** I LOVE PUIKA FAN CLUB***

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Louise View Post
                                Please, if they really are honey bees, find a beekeeper to remove them for you. There is some kind of "plague" going through domestic bee colonies, so bee keepers will probably be glad to have there.

                                Of course, if they are wasps or hornets, kill the darn things dead.

                                I agree with this solution. We have a bee keeper across the steet that we call whenever there is a stray swarm. He comes over, checks to see that they are honey bees and takes them home to his hives even if they are not his. He is very appreciative of any additional honey producers that he gets and we usually get some free honey from him.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I read a book a couple of years back - I'm tempted to say Temple Grandin? - where the author describes getting PO'd with moles ruining their lawn. Then she remembers reading about someone - I think Australian - similarly PO'd with some other pest, and he stood out in his garden and asked them - out aloud - to leave him alone....and they did.

                                  So....she tries the same thing, much to the amusement of her husband. She stands out in the yard, and tells the moles they're welcome to dig anywhere on her property, but please to leave her precious green lawn alone. And they do.

                                  So....did you try talking to them, and asking them to find somewhere on your property where they won't be as disturbed by humans?

                                  It's just a suggestion - free!

                                  Otherwise, go to your local farmers' market, find the people selling honey and beeswax candles, that sort of thing, and ask them to help - ?

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Rebmik View Post
                                    I KNEW IT!!! (as soon as I submitted, i thought...you know I'm gonna get all of these "don't kill the bees" answers!)
                                    I just wanted an answer, not the ECO friendly one.
                                    WE ARE ECO friendly, I just don't want them in the barn...we have bee hives on the 500 farm, there is a huge orchard on the farm, the farm is on permanent conservation easement...yada yada yada...i just didn't feel like including all of this peripheral info. Just wanted an answer to get RID of the bees in the old barn that cannot be tampered with...bees can an do live everywhere else on the 500 acres...just need this small area to be as "bee-free possible!!!!
                                    Even though honeybees are not native to North America, it is illegal in some places to kill them. I know it is in NC.

                                    If they are indeed honeybees, a beekeeper will come out and get them, then just seal up the holes where the honeybees could get in.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      One more for calling a beekeeper.
                                      A pussycat of a horse with a chewed off tail won the triple crown, The Cubs won the world series and Trump won the Presidency.
                                      Don't tell me 'It can't be done.'

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                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by Louise View Post
                                        Please, if they really are honey bees, find a beekeeper to remove them for you. There is some kind of "plague" going through domestic bee colonies, so bee keepers will probably be glad to have there.

                                        Of course, if they are wasps or hornets, kill the darn things dead.
                                        I agree, please don't kill them if they are really honeybees.

                                        If they are yellowjackets, then you might want to call in an exterminator, because they make HUGE nests inside walls, I have heard some horror stories about yellowjackets filling the walls of homes! It happened to a co-worker up in Connecticut, gave me nightmares for weeks.
                                        There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be. - Andy Adams

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