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Jack Russell as a Mouser?

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  • Jack Russell as a Mouser?

    Couple questions;
    Are JRT better then cats?
    What if the JRT is only in the barn 1-2 hours per day, will it be an effective mouser?
    Are the wirehaired non-shedders?

    THanks!!

  • #2
    My JRT's are good ratters/mousers and all round pest-controllers but I doubt they are as good as a cat actually in the barn. Though they are great out and about in the pasture etc they lack any form of subtlety, I suspect a cat would be stealthier and therefore better indoors, but I'm not a cat person particularly so don't know for sure.

    Both my dogs (one smooth, one rough) shed like crazy all year round. Really. I'm trying to trade in my car and so had to clean it. It took me the whole day to get the hair completely out of the car. Madness. My parents have a rough coated JRT that has never shed a hair (just my luck!) I'd have a look at the parents if you can.

    Comment


    • #3
      My JRT only "catches" mice after the cats have killed it, so I'm not so sure. I think cats are more able to get into places that mice like to hide.

      all JRTs shed to some degree with the smooth coat being the one who sheds most and the rough shedding the least. At least that was what I found when I was researching JRTs before I got mine.
      Rhode Islands are red;
      North Hollands are blue.
      Sorry my thoroughbreds
      Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :

      Comment


      • #4
        I am a breeder of JRTs!

        The rough coats and broken coats shed MUCH MUCH less than smooth coats do.

        As to how good a mouser they are. Yes they are fantastic... as long as they can get to where the mice are. You want to get a working bred JRT. Not one of the short legged puddin JRTs. They have never been bred to work (they can't.. they are way too barrel chested to ever fit down a hole ) They are more insistant and obsessed with getting critters than cats are. BUT some with that much prey drive as likely to kill cats if you have barn cats. My best hunter will kill ANY small animal he finds.

        JRTs are bred to hunt raccoon, fox, groundhog, and badger. Cats are much easier prey than badgers are!

        Check out JRTCA.com its a good site. If you are in the US they have breeders listed. Rescue is also a good option, there could be a rough coated mouser waiting for a home

        Comment


        • #5
          Mine is a pro. Kills rats as big as she is. Does a lot more work hunting in the barn than the cats do (they're the ones out in the fields, it seems). She didn't really get strong instincts until she was 3-4 years old, however.

          Comment


          • #6
            The thing with Jacks is they are not a very old breed, only about 150 years or so. Plus they have only recently been accepted into the Kennel Club of GB (and that only for "Parsons" Jack Russells. This is what makes them so good in my opinion as you are never quite sure what you are going to get... They generally have a very strong hunting instinct, sometimes too strong! My old JRT would chew through things (including the bulkhead of a van) in an effort to get at something. She would also take bread that had been left out for the birds and place it next to a bush, hide in the bush and kill the resulting birds! Taking these dogs for a walk can be fun as if you take your eyes of them they are down a hole after rabbits. I have never heard of a JRT that did not shed, but I would love one of them!

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            • #7
              Patterdale's are excellent mousers. They do not have the stealth of a cat, but they can kill dozens of mice per minute and love to wait around for the chance.

              They have rat killing competitions for them. Ewww.

              Comment


              • #8
                Mine is one of those barrel chested, short legged, broken coated ones you describe, but that's where the match on description ends. He has his Master's Mousers licence. He killed 5 one time within fractions of a second of each other. The 5 were all together, under a dog house in the garage. He 'points' to where they are hiding, I pull out the dog house and it's snap, snap, snap, snap, snap and all 5 are dead - long before I can type it out. He is truly incredible. It is only very, very rarely that a mouse gets by his paws and jaws.

                If you bring them up from puppies with cats, they won't kill them. He has a favorite cat and they sleep together when I let him in. He likes the other cats too, but he and his favorite cat wrestle and play tag and then curl up together, using each other for pillows.
                Tranquility Farm - Proud breeder of Born in the USA Sport Horses, and Cob-sized Warmbloods
                Now apparently completely invisible!

                Comment


                • #9
                  With Patterdale's you are more likely to get a more consistant "breed standard" than with a Jack

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kathyt View Post
                    The thing with Jacks is they are not a very old breed, only about 150 years or so. Plus they have only recently been accepted into the Kennel Club of GB (and that only for "Parsons" Jack Russells. This is what makes them so good in my opinion as you are never quite sure what you are going to get... They generally have a very strong hunting instinct, sometimes too strong! My old JRT would chew through things (including the bulkhead of a van) in an effort to get at something. She would also take bread that had been left out for the birds and place it next to a bush, hide in the bush and kill the resulting birds! Taking these dogs for a walk can be fun as if you take your eyes of them they are down a hole after rabbits. I have never heard of a JRT that did not shed, but I would love one of them!
                    This is true and not true. The JRT clubs of GB, Can, and the US have fought to keep the JRT OUT of Kennel clubs. I don't think anyone is working their Parsons as far as I know. There are breeders out there who actively hunt their dogs and will only breed dogs who will hunt. Also the parson is over all a larger dog than the JRT. (KC wouldn't accept the 10-15 inch range of the JRT.. so they made it 12-15 inches which is silly as very few of the larger dogs are able to work)

                    http://www.therealjackrussell.com/breed/history.php

                    No dog doesn't shed . But the rough coats are on par with poodles and that kind. The smooth coats though shed continuously. (can you tell what my preference is?)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I would much rather the JRT was kept out of all "kennel clubs" and left to the JRT clubs who lets face it have done a bloomin good job so far. It does make me laugh though this "Parsons" thing. My oh used to breed jacks and in every litter we had one so called "Parsons". The only difference I could see was they were taller (we nicknamed one "the long dog" he was almost as tall as his mother at 9 weeks. However
                      I do think that the "Parsons" that appears is proberbley nearer the type that was originally bred for as the dog was meant to be able to keep up with hounds AND to be able to go underground after the fox.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        We have both a Rat Terrier and a JRT at our barn. The Jack is much more chasey, not so patient as the Rat. She sits patiently like a cat and waits for the mouse. She always gets her man, er I mean mouse. Also gets along with the cats very well. The sit side by side, but the Jack chases them. The Rat will also let you know if one is under a trunk. Move the
                        trunk and she gets them. However, neither dog lives in the barn. The cats are on back up duty. They are also quite good at rodent control also. I think for the best results, you can't beat a good terrier and a posse of barn cats.
                        Lilykoi


                        Hell hath no fury like the chestnut thoroughbred mare

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Tiki View Post
                          Mine is one of those barrel chested, short legged, broken coated ones you describe, but that's where the match on description ends. He has his Master's Mousers licence. He killed 5 one time within fractions of a second of each other. The 5 were all together, under a dog house in the garage. He 'points' to where they are hiding, I pull out the dog house and it's snap, snap, snap, snap, snap and all 5 are dead - long before I can type it out. He is truly incredible. It is only very, very rarely that a mouse gets by his paws and jaws.

                          If you bring them up from puppies with cats, they won't kill them. He has a favorite cat and they sleep together when I let him in. He likes the other cats too, but he and his favorite cat wrestle and play tag and then curl up together, using each other for pillows.
                          LOL some of the puddin jacks are wicked hunters. But most are more laid back as they have been bred for the pet market.

                          The cat thing isn't true. Snip was raised with cats. You could see the wheels turning as he grew older. We rehomed the cat (to one of my best friends) my hubby was annoyed until Snip started killing stray cats that came around. If he is retrained and sees a cat (or squirrel etc) he starts shaking and vibrating I am on many dog/JRT forums. THere are JRTs who have have been raised with cats who one day decide a cat is prey. I do have JRTs I trust around cats.. but some who are iffy that I wouldn't (and one.. NO lol)

                          The whole thing with JRTs not being standard... That is not true! If you look at the JRTCC or JRTCA breeders. The dogs have a definite type. Patterdales are awesome dogs too, but they show the same slight variations in type that JRTs do (as long as were are not talking about byb or puppy mill (pet shop) dogs)

                          A good working dog will stay with the job as long as it takes. I remember Beacon as a 10 month old puppy spending hours working a rat that was in the manure pile and fenceline. He did get it. But a dog that is THAT focused and intense might not be the best if you are looking for a pet who just hunts mice for a couple of hours a day.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Just have to put in my two cents on the dog mousing. I had a dear little corgi who was considered by most to be on the small side, handy to get into small spaces. My housecats very seldom ventured into the barn so they were/are worthless for rodent control. But little Miss Corgi took up the cause. She not only caught them but ate them with a single snap. More than once I witnessed her flip the caught mouse in the air, and swallow it whole and alive. Gross, but effective.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I have a broken coated Jack that sheds more than my neighbors two Labs together!

                              Lousy mouser, probably wouldn't catch one if it ran between his jaws. He is, however, good with the cat (the real mouser in the family), selectively deaf and very even tempered with the new puppy, who torments him beyond belief.

                              We call him "Dud" Russell. He was a rescue, so we have no idea of his former life. Great dog, but utterly worthless as a farm dog--except he eats horse poop!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by jodyjumper View Post
                                I have a broken coated Jack that sheds more than my neighbors two Labs together!

                                Lousy mouser, probably wouldn't catch one if it ran between his jaws. He is, however, good with the cat (the real mouser in the family), selectively deaf and very even tempered with the new puppy, who torments him beyond belief.

                                We call him "Dud" Russell. He was a rescue, so we have no idea of his former life. Great dog, but utterly worthless as a farm dog--except he eats horse poop!
                                LOL that might be why he sheds.. Even a smooth should not shed as much as a Lab!! A good wirey coat needs to be stripped (think mane pulling) as it often does not come out on its own. The BC we have sheds wayyyy more than all the JRTs here.. its the undercoat.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Aven View Post
                                  They are more insistant and obsessed with getting critters than cats are.
                                  I had one years ago that went mising for several days. We could hear her barking faintly but could not find her. Turns out, she had gone down a hole after something, underneath my mother's kennels. The tunnel collapsed on her and she was buried alive the whole time. Tough things that they are, she lost a kidney due to dehydration but lived another ten years. She was the best damn mouser and ratter ever .
                                  Ridge Farm Inc.-full care retirement
                                  http://www.horseretirementfarm.com

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I had two chihuahuas who were champion ratters - not even mousers! Roach caught one almost as big as he was one time and it bit him on the tongue. He got so mad that he killed it immediately! They were relentless, and hunted as a pair, so they really tore up the rat population in our barn. I think that their record day was 20 in one day (we had a LOT of rats). I still have my girl but she's retired these days (she's 15 today, in fact). The male died at 10 from a heart problem.

                                    They are better in some ways than a cat, because they LOVE it and will kill one right after another, whereas a cat will usually stop after one. And the cat will take longer to kill it - I've seen the chi's shake one dead then drop it and immediately go after another.

                                    But ultimately, we had better luck with long-term control with cats AND the chi's. The cats were better because they were out in the barn all the time, whereas the chi's were only out there when I was.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      My Jack is a fantastic mouser. She's also great at getting moles and can snap birds right out of the air. I try to discourage the bird killing but she loves to stalk them around the property Luckily, she seems to limit her bird kills to the sparrows which is better then killing the barn swallows IMO.

                                      She loves cats, ducks and chickens. She sleeps curled up with the cats and likes to 'herd' the ducks and chickens around the property. She has never shown any aggression towards them or the horses/other dogs.

                                      She is one of the long legged variety. I got her from a barn litter when I was 13. I went to try a horse but the horse came up lame unexpectedly so they gave us a puppy for the trouble. My dad felt tricked.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Most are very good at ratting and mousing. But you have to allow them to do it and encourage it...like getting them excited and pointing out mice/rats when you see them and praising them for any kills. The barn where I grew up riding had dogs that were great ratters...but they were a mixed breed, a chocolate lab and a GSD cross. (we had some big-ass rats...probably JRT size, LOL) When we went into the loft or grain rooms or stall areas if the dogs were in there we'd have to "set" them to ratting if none were visible...using an excited voice and walking the walls pointing in corners and udner things saying "Get it, get it" and they'd get excited and smell them out and let us know if we needed to move anything. Not all dogs or JRT/terriers will automatically start hunting mice/rats on their own but will kill one if they see it. If you don't have the dog in the barn all day you might want to encourage it to look/hunt for vermin while it's there with you.
                                        Here's some terriers ratting:
                                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vjNdwha_ct0
                                        There was one thing I saw on TV a while back about a rat terrier or Parsons (can't remember which) that held a record in England. They had a huge grain shelter that was so overrun with rats it was gross. They set this one single dog loose in it and he was killing more than a rat per second! Just a constant "snap, shake, snap, shake"...it was astounding to watch! I forget the final tally but he had an enormous pile of rats after 5 minutes...a few hundred I'd guess!
                                        I love seeing a ratter ratting...and being used as a ratter/mouser. *Way* too many horse/farm folk get JRTs and then treat them as dress up dolls/lap dogs pnly and end up with psycho pains in the asses that don't kill anything and just yap and piss on everything. A good JRT is worth his weight in gold...but most I come across are just annoying footballs that need a good punt, LOL! They're also better behaved dogs when they have a job...ratting, agility, something to tire those energetic brainiacs out. Otherwise a tiny bundle of energy that's smart as hell can be a real PITA for a casual pet.
                                        You jump in the saddle,
                                        Hold onto the bridle!
                                        Jump in the line!
                                        ...Belefonte

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