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building your own run in shed

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  • building your own run in shed

    I have been looking at run in sheds for some time now and they are so expensive!! I have some boarders(Men) at my barn that said they would help me build one instead. Has anyone ever built their own run ins? Any advice or even blue prints you can give me?

  • #2
    Advice?

    -Consider making them on skids, so portable and tying them in place.
    That is what we have done and have moved some by dragging or hauling them several miles here and there as our needs changed.

    -Consider putting them where horses can get around the whole of them, as at times horses prefer to stand in front of it, other times behind it, depending on the sun/shade, wind/rain/snow and insects.

    Blueprints are not really necessary, just take pictures of those in your area that have stood to your weather and you like and most anyone can make them from the picture.

    Size will depend on how many horses you want to house.

    Comment


    • #3
      Building your own Run In

      I have built all my own run-in shed here. 5 of them so far. The hardest thing is to get them perfectly square, but I get better as I go. The best thing I have done is to use the Environ(not sure if that is the correct spelling) for the roof. They sell it at Lowes and its a rubberized ,corregated type panel. SO much easier and cheaper in the long run than the plywood, shingle thing. Also, if you don't have a nail gun, rent or borrow one!
      True story. We finally decided to build a shop for my SO here on the farm. Logical place for it was in my smaller field w/the 12x24 run in..So..we cut it off from the base, built a skid, and MOVED it(using the neighbors huge tractor to pull it) over into another field. Couldn't believe it held together. Anyway, by the time it was done, it was dark so we figured we would put in a post at each corner and sister them to the original posts the next day. Of course that is the night we had a huge windstorm and went out in the morning to find the shed upside down on the roof. We , again, got the neighbors tractor and flipped it back into the correct position. I got to watch about 10 men stare in awe at a building that a woman put together, stand that kind of punishment w/ very little damage.
      Good luck!
      Fox Ridge

      Champ. Welsh Lands End The Colonels Fox
      Fox Ridge Welsh ponies on fb

      Comment


      • #4
        Mr. IF has built 3 run-ins. The latest one is a 2 story job.....I'd call it a stable but he says it's a 2 story run-in. What I can tell you is that Mr. IF never built a shed in his life before he started ours. He drew his own plans. It's not that hard. The end result are three nice sheds that have held up well over time. So I would say to the OP, go for it.

        On the matter of having a shed on skids and being moveable, that's fine as long as its fairly small. If you are trying to provide the shed form more than a few horses, it becomes impractical. Also consider your terrain. My place is very hilly, moveable sheds work better with flatter terrain.

        I would suggest building a shed that is deep enough to place a round bale feeder in it. We do this in the winter to keep the hay dry. It works very well.

        I think the OP is lucky to have boarders who want to build a shed. It is much cheaper if you can do it yourself.
        Where Fjeral Norwegian Fjords Rule
        http://www.ironwood-farm.com

        Comment


        • #5
          We build them out of metal in our barn, the frame out of pipe for the runners and metal building barn for the sides and roof.

          When we need a larger one, we put two together, as those two 27' x 12' here:

          http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a2...g?t=1230726934

          We built them in our barn and dragged them into place with the tractor.
          These two were for the cattle pens and 30' x 12':

          http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a2...g?t=1230727247

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #6
            Thanks for the replies!!! Do you think a 10X20 would be large enough for two mares and foals???

            Comment


            • #7
              We did the same as Bluey. We used metal pipe to frame it, then drug it into place before putting up the sheet metal. I lined the inside of mine with plywood. We actually built 3 - 12x12s then pushed them together. Just in case we want to separate them out later.

              Be sure to anchor them into the ground once they are set. The wind in Texas has been known to blow them over!

              Comment


              • #8
                You may consider what material you will make them from and then make them the closest to the size of material you will use, so you won't have to cut so much and have many little pieces of waste material left.

                I would say that is the minimum size for two mares and foals and that is assuming that they get along very well, that one won't fight the other and keep her off the shelter.

                You will find that most adult horses will prefer to use the shelters only for wind protection and insect protection in the summers, as flies are less active in the shade.

                When it is raining, our horses sometimes stand right in front of the barn, in the rain, when they could step a few feet in there and be dry.

                Foals will frequently use sheds to take naps.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by SillyMe View Post
                  We did the same as Bluey. We used metal pipe to frame it, then drug it into place before putting up the sheet metal. I lined the inside of mine with plywood. We actually built 3 - 12x12s then pushed them together. Just in case we want to separate them out later.

                  Be sure to anchor them into the ground once they are set. The wind in Texas has been known to blow them over!
                  For horses, we do line them with 3/4" exterior plywood, although the metal we use is very thick and I doubt a horse could kick thru it, it is not the old, flimsy corrugated metal we used to have many years ago.

                  We dig a hole on each corner, drop a chain with a large bolt horizontal on the bottom, add a few sacks of concrete mix and bolt or weld the other end of the chain to the frame of the shed.
                  We have not had one tied in like that blown away yet, but we have had some tied to a post take a few tumbles.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I've made 7 of them from 12 x 12 to 32 x 64 their very easy to make and you can save alot of money doing it yourself. The one thing I tell people to do is to build a pad of fill dirt to build them on. So often I see sheds built on flat ground and have water in them from rain run off. Also build your shed in muliples of 4 feet to save lumber costs so I'd go 12 feet wide rather then 10.
                    Quality doesn\'t cost it pays.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Izthatrt View Post
                      I have built all my own run-in shed here. 5 of them so far. The hardest thing is to get them perfectly square, but I get better as I go. The best thing I have done is to use the Environ(not sure if that is the correct spelling) for the roof. They sell it at Lowes and its a rubberized ,corregated type panel. SO much easier and cheaper in the long run than the plywood, shingle thing. Also, if you don't have a nail gun, rent or borrow one!
                      True story. We finally decided to build a shop for my SO here on the farm. Logical place for it was in my smaller field w/the 12x24 run in..So..we cut it off from the base, built a skid, and MOVED it(using the neighbors huge tractor to pull it) over into another field. Couldn't believe it held together. Anyway, by the time it was done, it was dark so we figured we would put in a post at each corner and sister them to the original posts the next day. Of course that is the night we had a huge windstorm and went out in the morning to find the shed upside down on the roof. We , again, got the neighbors tractor and flipped it back into the correct position. I got to watch about 10 men stare in awe at a building that a woman put together, stand that kind of punishment w/ very little damage.
                      Good luck!
                      [/I]
                      Izthatrt- are you talking of Ondura? http://www.ondura.com/ If so, this is what we used for our roofing material for our barn. Good stuff.
                      "Sometimes you just have to shut up and color."

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        I would like to make mine portable, how do you secure it down then??? I know the one poster said make a hole and put a chain done etc..... any other ways??

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bluey View Post
                          We build them out of metal in our barn, the frame out of pipe for the runners and metal building barn for the sides and roof.

                          When we need a larger one, we put two together, as those two 27' x 12' here:

                          http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a2...g?t=1230726934

                          We built them in our barn and dragged them into place with the tractor.
                          These two were for the cattle pens and 30' x 12':

                          http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a2...g?t=1230727247
                          You guys are PROS!! Is that metal welded?
                          "My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sunlight and nicker to me in the night"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Ours is 12 x 24 or 15 x 24, can't remember, but it's plenty big for a round bale feeder and horses on either side of the feeder. Now it's holding the winter's supply of round bales with one rolled to the front so that pasture's horses can reach one, but not any of the other bales! My husband and a boarder's husband did it in a weekend. We used treated posts and treated 2x8's around the bottom, regular pine band boards at the top and middle and for the roof trusses and heavy duty metal for the siding and roof. We did not line the inside with wood and haven't had a problem with damage to either barn or horses. We only have 3 horses in that pasture at a time so that minimizes the conflict.
                            www.hollyrunstables.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Depending on your local zoning and how picky your assessors are, building even a largish run-in on skids means that it's classed as a 'portable' building, thereby avoiding having it added to your property taxes. At least that's how it works where we are. Your mileage may vary!

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by hrfponies View Post
                                Thanks for the replies!!! Do you think a 10X20 would be large enough for two mares and foals???
                                No. The alpha mare and her foal will be inside, and the other will be outside. My alpha mare could guard a full 60 ft. of opening! I think 12 x 30 might work, if the mares are reasonably friendly with each other.
                                My Equestrian Art Photography page

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  My husband built this one, and I helped. I'm always the grunt labor.

                                  He bought the roofing and the 6x6x12 posts, but otherwise he milled all the wood himself. It took us about a week to complete it. The trickiest part was making it a clear span, that required a bit of engineering.

                                  http://pets.webshots.com/photo/21375...48495570fUtuYk
                                  http://pets.webshots.com/photo/24075...48495570RJWMUA
                                  http://pets.webshots.com/photo/24637...48495570QGDvgB
                                  http://pets.webshots.com/photo/28214...48495570DfysvE
                                  http://pets.webshots.com/photo/26354...48495570CeXGxf

                                  The horses use it all the time. I'd like to have one in each paddock eventually.
                                  Stoneybrook Farm Afton TN

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    We hired our run in shed built, but I do have a suggestion for anyone wanting it to be shared amongst the herd. Ours is 12' x 36' with a 6' overhang. I had our contractor built 4' tall 'half walls' to separate it into 3 equal sized 'bays.' Now Alpha Mare can't plant herself in the middle and dare the lesser minions to seek shelter. Also second the suggestion to build up the ground, and I had several loads of sand spread on top of the fill dirt pad before we built it, since that makes nice cheap 'bedding.' You might even spread some crushed concrete along the front opening under the 'drip line' from the roof if mud is likely to be a problem. Ours drains away so that's not a problem but if it were, that's what I would do.
                                    Donerail Farm
                                    www.donerailfarm.com
                                    http://donerailfarm.wordpress.com/

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      We also built ours up with clay, then fill dirt, then packed it. Put about 10 tons of pea gravel down, then let that pack, then put another 8 tons of limestone screening in on top of that. Now it's well draining and soft enough for a good roll.
                                      Stoneybrook Farm Afton TN

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by birdsong View Post
                                        You guys are PROS!! Is that metal welded?
                                        My neighbor is a welder by trade, very handy.
                                        We welded the frame, well, he did most of it, as I had my arm in a cast that time and then screwed the metal on.
                                        We did weld ours, but there are kits you can buy that come with the frame ready to bolt, for those that don't weld.
                                        All metal barn companies around here will sell kits with whatever measure you give them.

                                        When welding you need to add reinforcements before you go dragging them, so they don't wobble too much over the bumps, that is what those extra reddish bars in that one were, that you cut off with a grinder with a cutting blade, after you set the sheds down.
                                        Either that or cross chain them with some boomers.
                                        Where we put two together, we only finish opposite sides on each, so the middles are open to fit together.
                                        Then we add a portable pipe panel there, so it really makes two bays, so two different groups can fit there without anyone hogging it completely.
                                        There, the panel also divides both pens when we close the gates, as that is really our roping steers pen.
                                        The horses were there during the day, while we were expanding their own barn.
                                        You may be able to see the panel in that one picture with two together.

                                        To tie portable sheds down, you can put posts there on each corner and tie to them.
                                        We used railroad ties for that with one shed, a tornado came by and flipped it over the ones on the back, breaking one and the shed went on tumbling, ending on it's roof.
                                        It didn't hurt it any, other than a scratch or two. We stood it up again with the tractor, which was scary and this time tied it down with our chain and concrete anchors.
                                        I would not worry about that, if you don't have tornadoes.

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