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Talk To Me About Live Wired Fencing (Coyotes)

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  • Talk To Me About Live Wired Fencing (Coyotes)

    I need to keep the wild out of my property. I called the County Trapper again today. Since there's only three in this vast area, the fact that California protects their wildlife more than they do their taxpayers and loved ones, that the State is broke and government is cutting back and laying off, I'm not keeping my fingers crossed. I left another message.

    A coyote came charging toward me yesterday morning around 9 a.m. and I heard from my neighbor that it was sitting just outside my 40 inch fence around 5 a.m. and she was afraid to get into her car to go to work. This is a residential neighborhood with lots of small children, dogs and cats, so there's lots tempting.

    I need to protect Jasmine. She MUST be right near me now when she's outside. I go armed with a flashlight, pepper spray and an air horn. I also have a heavy metal pole just outside the front door.

    I'll call an outdoors store tomorrow cause I seem to remember that fox urine is a deterrent. Problem there is that it's actually raining in SO Cal and the solution would dissipate and is probably expensive. This would also not be a permanent solution, though when coyotes are re-homed, others come and fill the vacant positions (so to speak). No application required!!!

    I can't afford to heighten the fence and they have been known to scale the highest of em'. The landlord wouldn't go for it either, so electric keeps running through my mind.

    Also moving isn't an option as they're all over. A dog was snatched from a lady walking her dog south of me yesterday and another, this one in my community, was snatched in a trailer park as it was being walked on a leash at 1:00 p.m. few months ago per my Vet. He said regardless of the time of day, always carry a strong pole where ever you are in the county.

    Please any and all info is greatly appreciated. T_H_A_N_K - Y_O_U
    "The best thing for the inside of a man is the outside of a horse" Lord Palmerston

  • #2
    What is it that you need to know? Put it around the top if they're climbing in the pasture. Hook it up to the electric box, and have a copper pipe for the ground-and hook it up. Keep that area wet for good connection Perhaps you and your neighbors could all invest in a couple of great pyrenees-and enclose your yards together, that way the pyrenees would know their boundaries and help protect the entire neighborhood.
    Equine Massage Therapy Classes and Rehab for Horses
    http://www.midwestnha.wordpress.com[/INDENT]

    Comment


    • #3
      You are completely over-reacting and your neighbor is a drama queen. What is a coyote going to do to a grown woman, much less a horse? It is like a small, weak dog or a large fox.

      Your vet is being totally irresponsible too and causing needless panic. There are about 35 million people in CA and probably about as many dogs. If there was some kind of major problem with coyotes to where we all needed to walk around with weapons we'd have heard about it. Literally millions and millions of people walk dogs every day in So Cal and survive to tell the tale.

      If you're afraid they're rabid, get someone to shoot them for you. Quick, easy, and only costs 25 cents or so. If you're just afraid of them being coyotes then you need to move to another state or country because the coyotes are not going anywhere, I have lived here long enough to be 100% sure of that.

      If you live out near the woods, deal with the fact that there are animals in the woods. Or move into the city. You cannot "keep the wild out"!

      Comment


      • #4
        Coyotes are too smart.

        The only way to get rid of them is to trap or kill them.

        While a healthy, well fed coyote will not attack humans, at least I've never read a report of that, a hungry coyote will do anything to get your small dog or cat and if you get in the way..................

        And if it's a coyote/dog mix, all bets are off. Those animals get the worse of both species.

        edited to add: I meant adults, not humans. To coyotes, children are like poodles, unfortunately.
        Last edited by cloudyandcallie; Dec. 24, 2008, 11:50 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          I would hot wire the top and bottom of my fence.... I live on a farm in Central Texas and we have lots of Coyotes! Coyotes are smart, but that doesn't mean that they'll figure out how to get through the electric wire; it means they'll get shocked a couple of times trying to get in and will move on to someone else's yard! Good luck.
          www.JaneeneWilliams.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Two strands, one low and one high. Get an AC (plug in) fence charger from your feed store and follow the instructions provided with it, they are not hard to install. I'd exchange my "metal pole" for a .410 shotgun pistol, but that's just me.
            "It’s a well-documented fact that of all the animals in the realm of agriculture, Bulls have the highest job satisfaction rate."~~Ree Drummond, AKA the Pioneer Woman

            Comment


            • #7
              Coyotes are a problem in S.Cal sburbs. They are so brazen and show no fear of man. It's why we can't have otdoor cats or outdoor small dogs-they will make a tasty snack. We have had a few attacks on very small kids recently-not many but still a cause of concern. Althogh this is the first I heard of a single coyote going after an adult. Did you have a pet with you? I heard of mtn lion urine as a detrrant-but also heard it may attract your local cougar (not Demi Moore) to come by and figure out who the resident is.

              When I was up north, I rarely saw them.Of course I boarded next to giant cattle ranches who did not like them. But down here except groves of fruit tree nothing for them to bother except fruit trees and sububuranite's pets-most of whom probably do not hunt. If I recall correctly, you don't need a permit to hunt-they are non -game animals. But DFG is not going to be that responsive to just one coyote.

              Comment


              • #8
                I have Coyotes in the open space behind my property. I hot wired their side of the fence around 18 inches up. It really scared them off. I also have a mule, who will chase strange dogs that enter the property.

                Mainly you want to deter them by scaring them. I fired off a .22 a few times, that worked. You can try pots and pans, and anything that smells like humans (worn clothing draped along the fence, etc.).

                If one REALLY charged at you, it could be sick and should be removed. I am in Northern CA, so the same laws apply to me. You CAN shoot them without permission if they are posing a hazard to your livestock. But call around and find someone besides Fish & Game who can advise you. I feel badly for Coyotes, they are sort of the bastard stepchild wildlife around here. No one protects them, no one cares that they are struggling with less and less places to hunt.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I knew it. The other thread everyone is cooing over the wildlife, and the awful hunters, and there are at least two open threads bitching about wildlife and how to kill it.

                  We've got a coyote problem around here. I'd not worry about an adult unless the animal was rabid.

                  Small children, cats, dogs, livestock, oh yeah. A coyote will snatch your dog right off the porch or leash.

                  We're having trouble with predation on livestock, mostly. Farmers shoot coyote if they see them near the livestock. Dogs and cats disappearing, but mostly its livestock predation (and I suspect turkey and bobwhite)

                  Don't know what to deal you except deal with it yourself. Legally of course.

                  And that's BS about coyote "struggling". Coyote populations have exploded - they've moved into populated areas and are thriving. They are extremely adaptable creatures and will happily live in suburban, even urban areas just fine. Same with fox. These are not endangered or threatened in any way.
                  Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                  Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                  -Rudyard Kipling

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Premier Fencing has a sheep and goat electrified net fence that they claim does a real good job of keeping wild preditors out and confined animals in. Only obvious drawback is there can't be any vegitation growing up on it. Well, that and it isn't very pretty...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Party Rose View Post
                      I need to keep the wild out of my property. I called the County Trapper again today. Since there's only three in this vast area, the fact that California protects their wildlife more than they do their taxpayers and loved ones, that the State is broke and government is cutting back and laying off, I'm not keeping my fingers crossed. I left another message.

                      A coyote came charging toward me yesterday morning around 9 a.m. and I heard from my neighbor that it was sitting just outside my 40 inch fence around 5 a.m. and she was afraid to get into her car to go to work. This is a residential neighborhood with lots of small children, dogs and cats, so there's lots tempting.

                      I need to protect Jasmine. She MUST be right near me now when she's outside. I go armed with a flashlight, pepper spray and an air horn. I also have a heavy metal pole just outside the front door.

                      I'll call an outdoors store tomorrow cause I seem to remember that fox urine is a deterrent. Problem there is that it's actually raining in SO Cal and the solution would dissipate and is probably expensive. This would also not be a permanent solution, though when coyotes are re-homed, others come and fill the vacant positions (so to speak). No application required!!!

                      I can't afford to heighten the fence and they have been known to scale the highest of em'. The landlord wouldn't go for it either, so electric keeps running through my mind.

                      Also moving isn't an option as they're all over. A dog was snatched from a lady walking her dog south of me yesterday and another, this one in my community, was snatched in a trailer park as it was being walked on a leash at 1:00 p.m. few months ago per my Vet. He said regardless of the time of day, always carry a strong pole where ever you are in the county.

                      Please any and all info is greatly appreciated. T_H_A_N_K - Y_O_U
                      This post is a joke right?

                      Right? Over a coyote???

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The only livestock a coyote is going to get is a small or young or sick sheep or goat. They will get chickens and cats too which is why, imho, having an outdoor cat without a barn to hide in in an area where there are coyotes is tantamount to animal abuse.

                        I hope this thread is a joke or that the OP either educates herself or moves back to town and leaves animal control in peace. I have seen coyotes hundreds of times and had no problems with them and on the rare occasion we get a nosy bunch my neighbors 40lb lab cross dog has killed several in one fight. They are not big tough animals and are usually not afraid of people because people feed them and leave food out for them not because they are stalking us for dinner. Coyotes are closer to foxes than wolves! They eat mice in the wild, not elk!

                        If you have really bold coyotes I bet you $10 some crazy cat lady in your neighborhood is feeding them either deliberately or accidentally by placing cat food out. We had one of those at our old place and we had a million coyotes. The dogs would actually play with them in the yard sometimes, they were pretty tame. Haven't eaten any babies yet.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A big coyote is about 30 lbs...in CA they're slightly larger and rangier than some other areas but no heavier than 40 lbs or so.
                          They will go after cats, small dogs, chickens, rabbits, geese, lambs, some smaller pygmy goats and sheep solo and grown sheep and goats in family groups, injured larger animals such as deer, etc. They don't eat kids or humans. That's like getting attacked by a Cocker Spaniel. (well those dogs do like to bite but few people fear getting eaten by one) The Cocker and a coyote are roughly the same weight...the Cocker being stockier built and lower to the ground and the coyote taller and thinner built but with a fluffy coat.
                          Was the coyote charging at you? Were there signs of aggression? Any noises, teeth bared, tail held stiff out? It could be ill...distemper or rabies. Those need to be shot...and while I know coyotes are in many suburban areas if you're living on a farm yoou need to have some sort of protection/tool for aggressive wildlife. Farms aren't just bucolic scenery spots for horses and children to romp on...wildlife is attracted to them. Some can cause issues and need to be removed. Also a real farm dog is necessary, not an ankle biter only.
                          Fox urine will not deter a coyote...fox are one thing on a coyote's menu if there's nothing better tasting around. And if they can catch one...fox are pretty crafty at avoiding coyote if they can. Wolf musk deters coyotes, it stinks to high heaven but will withstand rain. There's an oil in it that keeps it sticking around for a few days or up to a week with or without rain. But it does need to be reapplied every week to keep coyotes and other predators away. It won't deter badgers, fishers or wolverine...those can scare off a wolf. Or in the case of a wolverine...those can run off grizzlies. And people wihtout high powered rifles. And probably rhinos...you don't want to mess with a wolverine. (or a feral hog, but at least with both you'll smell them coming)
                          A paintball rifle is a good tool to have on a farm where the owner/operator isn't well versed with firearms or doesn't want a deadly weapon in a house with children. You can equip it with a stronger CO2 and even store the paintballs in the freezer and really deter the heck out of a coyote. And bruise the snot out of it too if the rounds are frozen. If the rounds aren't frozen and you hit them it still stings like heck...and if you miss the coyote you won't accidentally kill something else like a person or pet. You can buy them with a scope or buy a separate scope and have it attached and calibrated...makes it darned impossible to miss what you're aiming for. Takes about 30 minutes practice when you first get it to get used to it and after that you'll hit what you aim for most of the time.
                          Coyote are extremely smart...which is why they're one of the most adaptable North American animals. They are smarter than domestic dogs...and they're also known to be very curious and bold animals once they get used to an area and the people/animals in it. They can mock charge if they have young around...to get your attention and then they'll lead you away from the young while the other parent moves them.
                          Can you better describe your encounter with the coyote? Maybe someone or myself can give you an idea of what's going on.
                          You jump in the saddle,
                          Hold onto the bridle!
                          Jump in the line!
                          ...Belefonte

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Silver2, I don't know where YOU are, but here in Olahoma the coyotes are a lot bigger than foxes and nervy as all get out!! A couple of weeks ago one gorgeous big coyote went strutting across our farm - 90 acres surrounded by 100's of acres of cattle ranches. My first thought was that it wa one of my German bred GSD's...looked that big and in excellent flesh. Before I could blink there was another one just like it tagging along. They marched right across the pasture not too far from the stables despite the fact that we have a total of 7 guardian donkeys and a big Great Pyrennes. (not loose at the time). The next evening there were FOUR who all looked in well fed condition and again crossed near the barn. My husband fired a shot in the air and they slowly changed course and strolled out through the fence. We have lost numerous barn cats to the coyotes...and yes, we feed our cats twice a day and they have five different barns to live in, but the nature of cats is to hunt and when they get caught out in the pasture, they are coyote "dinner". A woman I know lost an Italian greyhound to a coyote while she was unhitching her trailer just 10 feet away and another one almost lost a JRT who confronted the coyote, not knowing he was being surrounded by three others. When her husband went out and grabbed the dog the coyotes challenged him - a BIG man!! So YES, there is a risk of a pack attacking a human. The coyotes in "these here parts" are well fed and prosperous due to the cattle population...nothing sweet and shy about ours. They will even get a newborn calf if momma isn't on her guard! The OP should be concerned.
                            www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
                            Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I've seen coyotes that are not much bigger than a fox.

                              And I've seen coyotes that are much much bigger than a fox. Unnaturally so. Those I'm concerned about. Not like "Oh my God I need to call 911." I'm just concerned because I don't know what they're mixed with and what sort of behavior I can expect.

                              We have had cases here of coyotes packing up and attacking livestock - but not full grown cattle - just the young. (as far as I know)

                              I don't care for them running out the fox. I'd rather deal with fox than coyote. But both are fascinating animals.
                              Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                              Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                              -Rudyard Kipling

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                This is no joke!!!

                                Thank you greysandbays for the product information & MistyBlue for your lengthy and informative post. I will get on the net and look for wolf musk & Premier Fencing's website.

                                I live in a residential neighborhood. The only possible move would be to a cement jungle and my mind and soul could not withstand not having any nature around me and my dog.

                                Another neighbor came to me today to warn me and tell me of his recent experiences. YES coyotes can be VERY large around here. I had just come back into my house, dog barked & ran back out. I peeked out the levelor and saw the coyote running at full speed toward my fence, as if it thought that it could get my dog if she had tailed behind me. Thankfully Jasmine came back in immediately.

                                California DOES HAVE a child / coyote problem. For those of you that are disbelieving, please google it.

                                So lets start again: Please tell me about electrifying my fence as I am clueless. You all have the product experience, I do not and this is why I am asking.

                                Again, I thank you.
                                "The best thing for the inside of a man is the outside of a horse" Lord Palmerston

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Around here some farmers use it for their free range poultry. I think FarmTek sells it but it's very expensive. I don't know how much you need, though.

                                  And coyote easily jump over fence anyway.


                                  Here is a link you might find interesting:

                                  http://texnat.tamu.edu/publications/B-1664/p5.htm
                                  Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                                  Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                                  -Rudyard Kipling

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Party Rose View Post

                                    California DOES HAVE a child / coyote problem. For those of you that are disbelieving, please google it.
                                    I live in California and have never heard of any such problems. Seriously though, coyotes? I'm doubtful. Even when used to humans, they are far more afraid of us - at the farm I worked at in Arizona ('serious' coyote country) they'd sun in our arena, and leave when approached. Mangy and harmless except in the case of distemper or rabies (not particularly common). Just because google or your vet says so doesn't make it true. Silly stories get overblown like that all the time.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I'm in CA so I've been around coyotes always. They are NOT dangerous and they do NOT get to GSD size. Those are dogs if they're really that big.

                                      party rose if your soul can't handle being parted form nature I suggest you learn to deal with living in nature. which, yes, means not leaving snack sized animals outside unattended. Electric fence won't work- the only way to keep coyotes out (or in, as we had some at a rescue) is a tall (5' or more) non-climb fence that is buried at least a foot deep, probably more. If you want to do that it'll work.

                                      ETA If you choose to have outdoor cats in coyote country the odds are they will be eaten and that, imho, is on you not on the coyotes. Some cats are smart enough to avoid them, most are not.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Urban coyotes are more brazen and visible than rural coyotes. No, they are not GSD sized, even at their largest. Perhaps 40lbs. Most are shy, but they do become very acclimated to people and town life. They are opportunistic hunters, and cats and small dogs are simply prey to them. Hungry enough, yes, coyotes will take dogs right off leashes---but honestly, folks, it is VERY rare, therefore, newsworthy. And, in the age of the internet and instant news, any "child or small dog vs. coyote attack" is BIG news.

                                        Should you be concerned about your horses? NO. Big NO. Small livestock (goats, lambs, single sheep)? YES, in your setting.

                                        I'd recommend exactly what others have said, electric wire low and high on a diamond mesh or "sheep wire" at least 5 feet high if you have these animals. Chain link at least 6 feet high for a yard. If the coyotes are as numerous and forward as you describe, then small animals should not be let out in the yard unwatched, regardless of fence height (although, they aren't nearly the climbers that foxes are).

                                        I think you are being overly dramatic, but obviously you are concerned about your animal's welfare, and that's not a bad thing.
                                        Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!

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