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Custom Eventing Barn?

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  • #21
    I have no experience with building barns, or even owning one, so i dont have much advice in that. But i know someday i will have a barn of my very own, and I highly suggest mkevent's website. There are some very useful ideas on there.
    Tack Cleaning/All-Things-Tack nut
    ~DQ wanna-be~

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    • #22
      Ah, I remembered something. If you live in a humid climate, you might want to store the majority of your hay in a separate building (it doesnt have to be too far away). I may be wrong, so please correct me if I am, but damp hay (and I would assume dry hay as well) is a fire hazard... If the hay were to catch fire, it would be better to have the hay shed burn down instead of the whole barn, with all of the horses and your equipment.
      Tack Cleaning/All-Things-Tack nut
      ~DQ wanna-be~

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      • #23
        Originally posted by Calvincrowe View Post
        I third the outside runs with an overhang off the stalls...even 12 x 36 offers a horse a much bigger space to "live" in, especially when your paddocks and pastures are unusable due to cold or wet. Stall cleaning is a snap, picking the paddocks daily and beginning by putting in geo cloth and gravel for the runs and maintaining them will be an attraction to most boarders. My horse poops outside if given a stall with a run...in one spot. He pees in the center of his stall, so the barn help loves him.

        I detest auto water systems. I've boarded at several barns over the last 2o years and they never function well, and during cold weather, you'll have to have buckets anyway. When they break, they create water hazards in your stalls (and they usually get broken by a horse or weather in the middle of the night). You can't tell how much/well a horse is drinking, either. Buckets take a bit more time each day, but are well worth it.
        I fourth the outside runs . The thing is, if you don't want to use the attached run, you can always close the door and keep the horse in the stall, but at least you will have options.

        As for the auto water systems, I wonder if people like them better in warm climates? I like those at the barn where I board. They work well (they are the bowl-shaped type designed for cows) and have been very durable. I do always keep a tub of water in addition to the auto water. If the tubs get dirty (like every day when my horse plays in it!) the auto water is available, and if the auto system were to malfunction, the tub is a backup. The only maintenance of the auto water bowls is occasional scrubbing -- I use a big handful of rocks and sand to scour them clean.
        "Random capitAlization really Makes my day." -- AndNirina

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        • #24
          Originally posted by hannahwdel2101 View Post
          Ok so my husband and I purchased 27 acres of land about two years ago. We built our house when we bought it on about 1 acre. Anyway, we are building our dream eventing barn!! Ooh I get exited just typing it! I have the basis of what I want to build so here's the list;
          - 25 European style stalls
          - 4 grooming stalls
          - 2 indoor/ 1 outdoor hot and cold wash stall
          - swing out feeders in every stall
          - fans in every stall
          - feed room
          - tack room with cubbies
          - automatic watering system
          - lounge with kitchen area
          - horse treadmill or exercise walker
          - cross country course with water element
          - indoor arena
          - large outdoor arena with hunt jumps
          - pastures and paddocks
          - round pen for lounging
          Anything that you think I should add to the list?
          Are you going to fill your 25 stalls with your own horses or are you planning to board? That info might change some of the suggestions. For instance, if you are going to board, I was thinking you might want to have two round pens.
          Last edited by PeteyPie; Jun. 5, 2013, 05:40 PM. Reason: reading is fundamental
          "Random capitAlization really Makes my day." -- AndNirina

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          • #25
            I agree - what a wonderful website, MKE!!! Love that you put so many tips and educational information/pointers on it. Very nice of you to put that time in! i think I'm going to get the long handled dust pan and broom thing!

            Originally posted by mkevent View Post
            Thanks ellebeaux!!

            BTW, OP-your place sounds awesome!!!

            I'm guessing you will be adding boarders. Be sure to ask for and call the references!! If you've never had boarders before, it is a bit of a painful learning process that you go through at first. COTH is a great place for advice.

            Good luck-what an exciting adventure!!
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            Equine & Pet Portrait Artist
            www.elainehickman.com
            **Morgans Do It All**

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            • #26
              Not to hijack, but if anyone has any suggestions or ideas that they would like to share, I would be more than happy to add them to my website!

              OP-another thing to consider if you are going to have boarders that are eventers, they will probably require more tack space if most have two saddles and assorted bridles. That may influence the set up of the tack room.
              http://thepitchforkchronicles.com

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              • #27
                Cut the amount of stalls you have in half. There way your property will support 25 horses on grass, and you should have grass!
                come what may

                Rest in peace great mare, 1987-2013

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by kookicat View Post
                  Fly misters might be an idea, too.
                  Think twice about this. A pro trainer I knew put these in and found he had to spend more money on chiropractic care and such subsequently. He decided that the horses weren't moving in little ways all day after the misters did the work of keeping the flies off them and were getting stiff.

                  If you keep a horse in a stall enough hours to want a fly mister, you might not want a fly mister!
                  The armchair saddler
                  Politically Pro-Cat

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by mkevent View Post
                    OP-another thing to consider if you are going to have boarders that are eventers, they will probably require more tack space if most have two saddles and assorted bridles. That may influence the set up of the tack room.
                    This. Ugh. Just moved to a multi-discpline/non-event barn and they think I'm NUTS for how much stuff I have.

                    And they're right, but I digress...
                    Pisgah: 2000 AHHA (Holsteiner x TB) Mare (lower level eventing, with a focus on dressage)

                    Darcy: 7? year old Border Collie x Rottweiler? Drama Queen extraordinaire, rescued from the pound in Jan 2010

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by mvp View Post
                      Think twice about this. A pro trainer I knew put these in and found he had to spend more money on chiropractic care and such subsequently. He decided that the horses weren't moving in little ways all day after the misters did the work of keeping the flies off them and were getting stiff.

                      If you keep a horse in a stall enough hours to want a fly mister, you might not want a fly mister!
                      If this was the case wouldn't all of the horses also have chiro issues all winter once the flies are gone?

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                      • Original Poster

                        #31
                        Extended List

                        So after all your suggestions, I made an updated list!
                        - 25 European style stalls
                        - 6 grooming stalls
                        - 2 indoor/ 2 outdoor hot and cold wash stall
                        - swing out feeders in every stall
                        - fans in every stall
                        - feed room
                        - tack room with cubbies
                        - automatic watering system
                        - lounge with kitchen area
                        - horse treadmill or exercise walker
                        - cross country course with water element
                        - indoor arena
                        - large outdoor arena with hunt jumps
                        - pastures and paddocks
                        - round pen for lounging
                        - outdoor runs with high fencing to prevent rough play
                        - Blanket room
                        - grain room
                        - laundry
                        - composting area
                        Thanks for all the ideas guys!

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          As someone who has managed eventing operations in barns not really meant for a barn full of eventers, build your tack room so that it can support the STUFF that comes with a barn full of event riders and their horses. That means enough room to easily stow at least two saddles and bridles for every horse (assuming you'll have boarders), all their boots, saddle pads, and everything else they come with. A good place for riders to hang up vests (Especially since you'd like a schooling course). Things like that. I've always made it work, but tack rooms get very crowded very quickly when you have multiple people who event working out of them.
                          Amanda

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                          • #33
                            Random thoughts:
                            I vote for buckets and short hoses between every two stalls. Long enough to reach both stall's buckets which hang close to the shared wall. These can be installed in such a way that you can tuck them into the wall, out of sight if you'd like.
                            Monitoring water intake is very important as a first indicator of illness, along with the points that the other pro-bucketers made.

                            Don't waste money on the swing out hay mangers. Horses should eat from the ground. The last barn I was in that had them NEVER used them because all of the boarders requested to have their horses fed on the floor.

                            Also, built in metal feeders for grain RUST, and are impossible to clean. Simple rubber feed pans that go on the floor make cleaning easier.
                            You can collect them, take them to the feed room and prep the feed right in them which saves labor for feeding. You just go down the line and give every one their feed pre-prepared and you only get ONE container dirty, not two.

                            If you make the runs open onto the pasture at the rear, you can save a lot of time spent turning out. Just be aware that the running in and out of the gates can be hazardous to all involved. Train them to be quiet about exit and entry.

                            We had runs with the fence line on every other stall. This made for bigger runs and the possibility for alternating day/night turnout for the two Horses sharing the runs if the pasture was not being used.
                            the runs were 24'X 80', with gates at the rear that opened into the pasture. It was perfect. You just had to be careful that both exterior stall doors were horse proof so you didn't have accidental sharing.

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                            • #34
                              Think about steps and the ways to reduce them! If I had a barn to design I would put in aisle way that was wide enough to drive though with a tractor/4 wheeler that would pull a dump wagon and/or bring bulk bedding in by the tractor bucket load. At one farm we could do 35 stalls in about 1 and 1/2 hours with 2 people. Think about locations of your feed stalls (for easy delivery of grain) grooming stalls (good light for farrier and close to a door so he/she isn't far from their truck). Auto waterers are great unless your power goes out. I'm a big fan of running water lines to the outside of each stall with a short hose to fill the buckets in the stalls. Easy to monitor water intake but easy and quick to do without a big hose.

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                I am another who would vote for fewer stalls/more turnout. I have a friend who built the most beautiful barn I've ever seen. It's far nicer than my house! But she used up so much of her paddock areas that her horses now really have no grass. It gets eaten too fast.

                                When I look for a barn I look at turnout first.
                                Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
                                EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.

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                                • #36
                                  Instead of swing out feeders, I have small doors in the grillwork above the feed tubs in each stall. All I have to do is open the door, dump the feed into the bucket and close the door. This eliminates the need to go into each stall to feed grain.
                                  http://thepitchforkchronicles.com

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                                  • #37
                                    Nobody will use the roundpen especially if it's an eventing barn. Eventers tend to just get on and ride it out, have you seen the dressage warm up at the first show of the spring?

                                    PARKING! Nothing drives me crazier then pulling a 3 horse slant onto a property for a lesson and finding nowhere to park or turn it around except maybe the grass. Which is good if the grass is dry and you have 4 wheel drive.
                                    http://weanieeventer.blogspot.com/

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                                    • #38
                                      farm location?

                                      Where are you building this fabulous barn?

                                      I'd add heat lamps to wash stalls and the area where the farrier/vets will be in the winter.

                                      Comment


                                      • #39
                                        Originally posted by SAcres View Post
                                        Cut the amount of stalls you have in half. There way your property will support 25 horses on grass, and you should have grass!
                                        Agreed. I'd much rather keep my horses out 24/7 if you're in an area of the country that allow sit - they stay fitter and calmer, are less prone to ulcers and colic etc.
                                        ----------------------------------------
                                        PSSM / EPSM and Shivers Forum
                                        http://pssm.xanthoria.com/
                                        ----------------------------------------

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                                        • #40
                                          Originally posted by mkevent View Post
                                          Instead of swing out feeders, I have small doors in the grillwork above the feed tubs in each stall. All I have to do is open the door, dump the feed into the bucket and close the door. This eliminates the need to go into each stall to feed grain.
                                          Or you can hang a hay bag you put thru those doors, or tie the bag inside the stall, open on the feed door and just open the door and push the hay flakes in the bag.

                                          With swinging feeders, you are suck with using only them, not special feed buckets if a horse needs some.

                                          Feed doors low enough that short people can feed are nice too, if you ever have youngsters there.

                                          Feed doors are great if you have to be gone and no one is there and some non-horsey person can be asked to just throw the feed in there one afternoon or so, feed you leave right there ready.

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