• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Pawing in the trailer. Can it be fixed?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Pawing in the trailer. Can it be fixed?

    My gelding tends to paw in the trailer, generally when moving slowly or at a standstill. This evening he destroyed a shipping boot because of it.

    We've done the tap the brakes routine, goosing the truck, etc. I've forced him to stand on the trailer until he quiets down before unloading, but the people I lease him to don't have that kind of time.

    WTH can I/they do? It's SO. FRUSTRATING. especially when we pull onto the showgrounds and it sounds like he's about to break the floor. He doesn't get sweaty, he loads and unloads like a champ, and he stands quietly at the trailer once we get where we're going.

    So, advice would be good.
    runnjump86 Instagram

    Horse Junkies United guest blogger

  • #2
    My ottb did it when I first got him, but stopped. I guess he just figured out that trailering was no biggie. We would tap the brakes, but it didn't do much. It was like he just decided to stop on his own.

    Comment


    • #3
      You haven't done the "you're going to sit on here until you're quiet" routine enough. Keep doing it. And make sure he has hay to munch on so he has no excuse.
      "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
        You haven't done the "you're going to sit on here until you're quiet" routine enough. Keep doing it. And make sure he has hay to munch on so he has no excuse.
        ^^^ This. Put him in the trailer and feed him his grain. Do it when you have the time and when you don't plan on taking him anywhere. Just load, feed, stand quietly, then unload. Repeat. By loading him and letting him stand there until he gets over the anxiety then unloading him still at 'home' it will help make the whole issue less stressful when you actually take him somewhere...

        I've had babies that I've separated from the herd (one at a time), put them in an area with the trailer, put their food and water in the trailer (dividers removed) and left them to sort it out on their own. When they get hungry or thirsty they will go in the trailer on their own. Those horses have turned out to be the best loaders and calmest shippers ever.

        Comment


        • #5
          My mare does this too. If tapping the brakes doesn't work I usually stick my head out the window and yell "cut that out you stupid cow!".

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #6
            We've done the "stay on until quiet" routine A LOT, and with *me*, he doesn't get off until he's quiet. However, I'm not the only one hauling him, and they don't have the time to let him stand there for 10-15 minutes, and I can't ask them to do that. Back when I hauled out for lessons, previous to moving him to our current location, I would load him before I had to leave, clean his corral, then head out. There were a couple of times I would start to leave, then stop and wait again. Once I even came flying out of the truck with a dressage whip. Same thing when we would return...I would unload what I needed to, get feed ready, do whatever had to be done, THEN unload him.

            He's 11. He's been trailered a million times, including across the country. If I wasn't so concerned with SOMETHING going wrong, I would hobble his ass.
            He has hay. It's mostly when the trailer is actually moving, but at slow speeds.
            runnjump86 Instagram

            Horse Junkies United guest blogger

            Comment


            • #7
              Then it sounds like it might just be his one 'quirk' and not anxiety.

              My gelding chews on lead ropes, it's annoying and I could get him to quit if I really wanted to but it isn't worth it as lead ropes are cheap and at least he isn't trying to untie himself. My mare weaves in the trailer, completely anxiety related, but only when we are moving and only sometimes. She's retired now so I don't have to haul her much anymore but it was always funny when someone new was in the truck and she started doing it... the looks I would get!!

              Comment


              • #8
                I doubt you can stop it at this point without major work, and maybe not even then. Have you tried putting lots of bedding down? Sometimes if they can't make a racket they get discouraged.

                Comment


                • #9
                  My good horse does it and he's spent DECADES in the trailer, DECADES. He won't ever stop it though he's improved. He does it out of impatience-if he's loaded and the truck is running and we're in the driveway he will paw. If we're in traffic and stopped he won't. If we stop at the gas station he will give us 10-15 minutes to fuel up and get supplies and if we don't get moving soon he will start to paw. If we're at the trail head and don't unload in short order he will paw. If we unload other horses and not him he will paw. If we're heading home he doesn't paw. If we're making reasonable understandable-to-him progress he won't paw.

                  Sometimes they just know what's going on and they want to give their input! LOL

                  I hung a rubber mat type thing on the trailer wall at his spot in the trailer to protect the trailer and his hoof and it made it not so loud too.
                  “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My horse pawed when she first started trailering, but stopped with the ignoring her until she was done routine. At this point, I think unless your lessees do the waiting routine, he may keep it up.

                    My horse now does the pawing when she trailers somewhere with another horse, and the other horse leaves and she is stuck on the trailer. I figure that is anxiety induced, because her "herd" left and am hoping she'll get over it with time and practice. In your horse's case, it doesn't really sound like anxiety to me, more impatience or a habit. I know how annoying it is- but I think they'll just have to ignore it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by cowboymom View Post
                      My good horse does it and he's spent DECADES in the trailer, DECADES. He won't ever stop it though he's improved. He does it out of impatience-if he's loaded and the truck is running and we're in the driveway he will paw. If we're in traffic and stopped he won't. If we stop at the gas station he will give us 10-15 minutes to fuel up and get supplies and if we don't get moving soon he will start to paw. If we're at the trail head and don't unload in short order he will paw. If we unload other horses and not him he will paw. If we're heading home he doesn't paw. If we're making reasonable understandable-to-him progress he won't paw.

                      Sometimes they just know what's going on and they want to give their input! LOL

                      I hung a rubber mat type thing on the trailer wall at his spot in the trailer to protect the trailer and his hoof and it made it not so loud too.
                      Got me one of these, she knows when we get to the show grounds vs stopping for gas, food, etc. If I have a later adult division and the kids are showing in the early short stirrup, mare has to come off with the ponies. No way will she submit to standing on a trailer while there is all this fun going on (she does like to be at shows). I end up many a show day holding onto my horse for hours.

                      Tried the wait it out, she ain't stressed, just pissed and can hold out longer than anyone has time for.
                      “You'll always miss 100% of the shots you don't take.” - Wayne Gretsky

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have one as well. Every horseshow/clinic trip means a ferry boat ride, and if he's in a pawing mood I have to stand outside of his window to get after him for the 20-30 minutes we're waiting for the boat and then the 30 minute boat ride. Nothing I've done has helped at all, though admittedly I haven't spent that much time on it. He also paws as his first reaction to pretty much everything, including pawing the whole time he's eating grain or bored in a place out of my control (he's good in the crossties and in hand/under saddle). I keep hoping he'll outgrow it at some point, but maybe that's not the most proactive training method?
                        __________________________________
                        Flying F Sport Horses
                        Horses in the NW

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I just don't care-when he paws I know, as does the whole family, that we're wasting his time! I just roll with it-he's so good in so many ways that this one isn't enough to fuss about.
                          Last edited by cowboymom; Apr. 13, 2013, 02:14 PM.
                          “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey

                          Comment

                          • Original Poster

                            #14
                            Thanks for the input.

                            He does have a few quirks, but this is the only one that drives me INSANE. I've almost resigned to the "Just smile and let it be" because like someone said, it's probably not worth the effort trying to change it.

                            I have an old stock trailer that I thankfully don't *have* to use as much anymore because of hitching rides with my trainer, but OMG when we would pull into places, I wanted to hide my face. The trailer itself was loud, but combined with Mr. HURRY UP MOM! it was embarrassing.

                            I think I will try kick chains when *I* haul him, as I know they won't be comfortable with it. If they help, then I'll probably have to insist...if not, then I guess I'll just grit my teeth and turn up the music in the truck!
                            runnjump86 Instagram

                            Horse Junkies United guest blogger

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My filly does this. Well, did it. I ignore her. She usually cuts it out. Yelling at her is attention, so I don't even do that. I have heavy rubber mats on the floor, she really can't hurt the trailer.

                              I have a different philosophy about waiting until they are quiet to move. I just leave once they are loaded. Quickly. I hate getting all dressed up and ready to go, then sitting in the car to wait for my mom (when I was a kid, that was like the most frustrating part of my life... ) I load em, and we leave when I feel like it. Usually the movement quiets them down, by the time we get to the highway. If they are really just pawing back there (as opposed to out-and-out tantrums) then I'm really not terribly concerned. It's noisy, but not awful...especially if they aren't stressed out on arrival and the trailer is protected against damage.

                              I also make a point of opening the escape doors when I stop, even for gas. The old trailer just had windows, so I dropped the bars when we stopped. Noisy filly usually gets enough to look at that she forgets to be an idiot. If she's quiet while I fill the truck, I talk to her a bit and tell her she's a good girl. She also usually gets some apple slices or cookies when we stop, after she's stood a few minutes quietly. This horse really, really likes attention from humans.

                              Does your horse maybe dislike shipping boots? This filly of mine can get a little fixated on things like that, if she couldn't reach down to itch a boot, or pull it off if she didn't like it, she'd make quite a scene until she got it off too. Wraps don't bug her, but they stay in place better than shipping boots (IME.) My gelding also does this, if his boots are bothering him on the trail, he tries to scratch it with his head/nose, then paws and gets balky...usually means something is stuck under a bell boot. As another paw/boot stress anecdote, my TB gelding started to paw uncontrollably the first time he noticed that his galloping boots had flashing LED lights in them. He had dropped his head to scratch, and realized that his legs were blinking. Cue aggressive pawing/flicking for about 10 minutes (I wasn't riding, he was loose in the arena to roll, just his boots on.) I LAUGHED...
                              Lifestyle coordinator for Zora, Spooky, Wolfgang and Warrior

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                This is the issue I have with my draft cross. He only does it while being trailered alone. Slamming on the breaks doesn't help. He paws so much that he usually dislodges the chest bar. I have toyed with letting him ride untied, witht he divider out, but have to admit I am a bit chicken to try this.
                                With a buddy, you don't know he is back there. The problem is that with his size, it is nervewracking (he is 17 hands). He gets the trailer AND truck rockin' and rolling. Therefore, we don't go anywhere alone. I can't deal with the stress.
                                I used to have a trailer buddy, but she is MIA at the moment. I have asked everywhere for a free trailer buddy, but sadly, no takers.
                                Therefore, we have been grounded lately.
                                Once we buy a farm, my daughter will get another horse and then the problem will be solved...but until our house sells, it is really frustrating!
                                Lori T
                                www.calypsofarmeventers.blogspot.com
                                www.facebook.com/LoriTankelPhotography
                                www.facebook.com/LTEquine for product updates on the lines I rep

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X