• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Anyone just smash up the poop in the stalls and not clean on a daily basis??

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #61
    My horses are rarely stalled but when they are I go out before I go to bed around midnight and pick stalls. It's done again in the morning while they eat, first thing.

    Normally my 2 fat horses are kept on a 250 x 250 dry lot with a run in,
    We go out in the morning with the little tractor and cart and pick the lot and run in.
    I pick the run in each time I go out to feed or whatever and then the whole lot is picked again early evening before dark.
    I check and pick if needed the run in one more time before I go to bed.

    I 'ain't" going to have one of my horses standing in poop,
    No horse should have to.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.

    Comment


    • #62
      Originally posted by Fairview Horse Center
      They do it all of the time. Some horses are neat in their stalls, but others are total pigs, and poop all over. If they poop next to their feed bucket, they will be searching for crumbs on/around that pile the next meal. Same with when they poop where they have spread their hay for the night.
      I haven't seen what you're describing, and I've been around horses a long time. Says something about your horsekeeping skills then. I'm not going to keep arguing with you. I think many of your ideas are crazy anyway.

      This thread has possibly given FHC a new idea for how to manage the stalls in her barn!

      Comment


      • #63
        I think some of these comments are reflecting horsekeeping in different climates. Enclosed stalls, in a humid environment, are quite different from open stalls in a very dry environment. I would echo Fairview that the older I get, the more I learn. What's most important is the end result - is there ammonia, moisture, and flies, or is there not?
        If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket

        Comment


        • #64
          grayarabpony, you are always entertaining The fact that you have not seen a horse that is a pig in their stall says a lot about your level of experience.

          I guess you have not seen horses either that tend to like to poop IN their feed or water buckets. I shifted one horses water buckets into each corner of his stall to find a place he would stop doing that. Thankfully, he gave it up after about 6 months of driving me crazy.

          I still remember also when one of my self care boarders met me in the morning and asked me if I knew what a full house was. She was very mad at her horse who managed to fill not only both of his water buckets that night, but his feed bucket too.

          Comment


          • #65
            Originally posted by poltroon View Post
            What's most important is the end result - is there ammonia, moisture, and flies, or is there not?
            Yes.

            Comment


            • #66
              Originally posted by Fairview Horse Center
              I guess you guys have never been at a barn with a manure spreader that spreads manure on the fields?
              If I were I wouldn't be there long.

              My sympathies to the OP. Do you get gnats in AZ? If not it's a shame. A barn swarming with clouds of gnats is very educational.
              Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.

              Remember the horse does all the work, we just sit there and look pretty.

              Comment


              • #67
                Originally posted by ldaziens View Post
                I am also confused about paying for a manure dumpster. We compost ours. I guess it makes sense if one had a lot of horses on a very small property - or something. That could be a profitable business - charging to pick up the manure, then composting it and selling the compost - making money from the suppliers and the consumers.

                And, I, like others am really confused about the "smashing", which would take more time & effort than just picking it up.
                there are a lot of places where you can not compost that must manure.. the manure must be carted away.

                Comment


                • #68
                  That's what I'm thinking.

                  Harrowing fields and spreading manure on fields is 100% normal and customary practice in this region. And no, we're not making Mother Nature cry because we are destroying the earth.

                  We are adding nutrients back to the soil that were removed by grazing or haying. You soil test and add lime/fertilizer as necessary depending on what the land is being used for.

                  I guess everyone could pay out the nose to have it all removed, so a company or gov't entity can compost it and sell it (keeping the money of course). Then the owner could incur additional expense by purchasing more fertilizer for their now depleted hayfields and pastures, which fertilizer will run off when it rains.

                  What is telling to me is not how fancy a place is or how obsessed the owner is with their animal's poo. I look at the condition of the animals. If they are in good health, alert, and in good condition - that's all that matters.





                  Originally posted by poltroon View Post
                  I think some of these comments are reflecting horsekeeping in different climates. Enclosed stalls, in a humid environment, are quite different from open stalls in a very dry environment. I would echo Fairview that the older I get, the more I learn. What's most important is the end result - is there ammonia, moisture, and flies, or is there not?
                  Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                  Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                  -Rudyard Kipling

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    She your SIL? Talk to your brother if your suggestions fall on deaf ears. Explain in vivid detail what life would be like if she continues to do this.
                    “Pray, hope, and don't worry.”

                    St. Padre Pio

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Smashed poo in a very dry climate will tend to become powder/dust. That means it gets everywhere; water buckets, feed, hay, coat, lungs etc.etc..
                      ... _. ._ .._. .._

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        So, most think this is an awful idea. I agree. So, how do you guys manage your manure and keep flies away?

                        We live in the mecca for bugs. This state is where bugs send vacation postcards to other bugs to tell them how great it is. In fact, you could say we have a thriving bug culture down here (like NYC for insects), yet, we get away with using no pesticides. We use fly parasites and composting (where it's piled so it actually heats up and destroys eggs). We use the compost to grow veggies. We use our own homemade fly spray concoction on the horses and cows.

                        Our horses are kept in stalls with runs. We use shavings in the winter and swept stall mats the rest of the year. Our horses all sleep in their sandy paddocks and all but one poops in their stall primarily. The paddocks and stalls are picked at least once per day. We even strip our chicken coop regularly and replace the shavings (it has an above ground floor).
                        “Pray, hope, and don't worry.”

                        St. Padre Pio

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          We do pretty much exactly what microbovine is doing: fly predators really help in the summer to keep the flies down to a dull roar. We compost our shavings/manure mix and spread it on the fields. We have a poop stomper(walker) who could justify a complete stall strip daily. We sometimes will poop pick the stalls at night check just to lower the clean up in the morning.
                          I doubt that the SIL is interested in the OP's opinion...sounds like they are all riding without helmets anyway...

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by microbovine View Post
                            So, most think this is an awful idea. I agree. So, how do you guys manage your manure and keep flies away?

                            We live in the mecca for bugs. This state is where bugs send vacation postcards to other bugs to tell them how great it is. In fact, you could say we have a thriving bug culture down here (like NYC for insects), yet, we get away with using no pesticides. We use fly parasites and composting (where it's piled so it actually heats up and destroys eggs). We use the compost to grow veggies. We use our own homemade fly spray concoction on the horses and cows.
                            Hahahaha. Absolutely true about being paradise for many species of arthropod-Americans.

                            I'm slowly going green. I used to use feed-through fly control, and had worse flies with it than without. I think it's because I was killing off my dung beetles - who manage an astonishing amount of manure - and because there are so many deer and other wildlife that flies have plenty of un-fed-through-poo in which to reproduce. Now I let nature take its course, and have been rewarded over the years not just with dung beetles but also praying mantis, dragonflies, and wasps.

                            Sadly, the homemade fly repellent I've tried (with essential oils, no pesticides) doesn't work for us down here in my corner of swampy SC. Wipe II does a wonderful job, though. Care to share your recipe?

                            I only have one horse who will poo in his shed, but I compost his and use it for the garden. The younger boys go in their pasture, and three quarters of the year it gets spread by the mower when we cut the fields. During winter, I just let it go. Unsightly, but one only has so many hours in a short winter day.

                            I'm thinking of adding guineas or some kind of free-range poultry, but I'm not sure how long they'd survive, what with the bobcats, foxes and coyote.
                            I'm not ignoring the rules. I'm interpreting the rules. Tamal, The Great British Baking Show

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              What helps with horses avoiding flies here;
                              (There are chicken and cattle farms all around us)

                              Night turn out.
                              Effective stall fans.
                              Barn Swallows.
                              Bats.
                              P F Harris Natural Fly Repellent for horses when ridden.
                              ... _. ._ .._. .._

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Is this in a STALL or an outdoor run in. I don't advocate it (by any stretch) but some people seem to leave manure in pastures/run ins and then just use the tractor to split it up and spead it. Could that be what she meant?
                                ~Veronica
                                "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
                                http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/

                                Comment


                                • #76
                                  Citronella and Skin-so-soft in a water/apple cider vinegar base. It has to be re-applied frequently. I forgot one thing, we hang those plastic jar traps as well (the ones with the fly sex attractant).

                                  I think the biggest key is removing manure and piling it up. If you can see flies on your manure pile, you need to turn it more often. Back in Virginia, we had soil in 30-45 days, but it takes longer down here. More like 6 months because of the sand.

                                  Also, Quest does not harm dung beetles. Ivermectrin kills them. We also have a healthy dung beetle population.

                                  We also have guineas. They are very helpful, actually. You have to start with more chicks than you want (10-14) because there will be some losses if they free range (the hens nest on the gorund so you will lose most of your hens). We are down to 7 and holding. Lock them up for the first 14 weeks in a coop with feed and water, then let one or two out per day and bring them back in at night for the next week or so. Finally, let them out during the day and they might come back in at night. If not, they will pick out a nice tree to roost in. They are from Africa and are highly suspicious of everything. In fact, they are amusing to watch because if you change anything in your yard, they will stop and scream at it. They are not known for intelligence. Ours act as if every day brings a brand new world. It's been over a week since I put up the scarecrow and they still sound the alarm every morning when they pass it on their rounds.
                                  “Pray, hope, and don't worry.”

                                  St. Padre Pio

                                  Comment


                                  • #77
                                    Ask her if she likes to live in her own poop and pee? How about never flushing the toilet and just mashing it down?
                                    Can we say serious respiratory problems, Thrush etc. not to mention the smell and flies! Why are some people so ignorant or arrogant that they refuse to learn the correct way to do things.
                                    You can't fix stupid, Maybe a vet or farrier will clue her in.. or does she not feel she needs them either??

                                    Comment


                                    • #78
                                      Originally posted by Fairview Horse Center
                                      Haha, but they DO. They poop on their hay, and then eat it. They dribble grain out of their mouth over a pile of manure, and then pick thru to eat the pieces.
                                      It is gross, but true, that there exist horses whose indiscriminate lips do not recoil from manure. I have three fat, happy mares who live on 5 lovely wooded acres with scenic views and 24/7 access to good hay. I use a Gator to both distribute hay and collect the poop. After feeding there's always a few wisps of loose hay left in the Gator bed, so I dump the poop on top of it to make it slide out easier at the manure pile. Well, no sooner do I dump my first bucket of crap onto the old hay in the Gator than my disgusting mares flock around to fight over who gets to eat it. I mean, not two feet away they have freshly-thrown, delicious, non-contaminated hay in nice, clean feeders. They actually seem to prefer the manure hay. Gack, it's dreadful.

                                      They also love to chew on the Gator itself, but that's another story.
                                      Dreadful Acres: the chronicle of my extraordinary unsuitability to country life

                                      Comment


                                      • #79
                                        FWIW, I know how some of you recoil in horror at the thought of throwing away beautiful manure, however...

                                        Depending on what you bed in, it will change the pH make it less useful to whoever might want it.

                                        Depending on your area, composting more than one or two horses might be a no-no.

                                        Not everyone has the abilities or room to compost.

                                        I had the local ag folks out to discuss running pvc with holes for air, etc etc, turning, concrete floor, etc etc, so I could compost for eight horses back when I had a barn. Awesome ideas they had. I called every single nursery in the book within about an hour's drive, and they most certainly did NOT want any beautiful manure.

                                        So I tossed it, other than the oldest, blackest stuff at the bottom of the pile, which my neighbor came and grabbed up and then gave me scary large veggies later.

                                        Also, some "greener" places accept compostable items separate from trash and recycle. My county does.
                                        COTH's official mini-donk enabler

                                        "I am all for reaching out, but in some situations it needs to be done with a rolled up news paper." Alagirl

                                        Comment


                                        • #80
                                          Originally posted by TheJenners View Post
                                          FWIW, I know how some of you recoil in horror at the thought of throwing away beautiful manure, however...

                                          Depending on what you bed in, it will change the pH make it less useful to whoever might want it.

                                          Depending on your area, composting more than one or two horses might be a no-no.

                                          Not everyone has the abilities or room to compost.

                                          I had the local ag folks out to discuss running pvc with holes for air, etc etc, turning, concrete floor, etc etc, so I could compost for eight horses back when I had a barn. Awesome ideas they had. I called every single nursery in the book within about an hour's drive, and they most certainly did NOT want any beautiful manure.

                                          So I tossed it, other than the oldest, blackest stuff at the bottom of the pile, which my neighbor came and grabbed up and then gave me scary large veggies later.

                                          Also, some "greener" places accept compostable items separate from trash and recycle. My county does.
                                          You reminded me of this cool system that I read about -

                                          http://www.o2compost.com/content/Bay_Systems_Sm.htm
                                          Disclaimer: Just a beginner who knows nothing about nothing

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X