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Holy Coyote!

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  • #41
    As I recall in NC a lot of the Red Wolves were hit by cars. My FIL thought they were probably looking for some open ground. The swamp is sooo dense in the eastern part of the state.

    Comment


    • #42
      Originally posted by grayarabpony View Post
      As I recall in NC a lot of the Red Wolves were hit by cars. My FIL thought they were probably looking for some open ground. The swamp is sooo dense in the eastern part of the state.
      It certainly is. That's why our deer hunters are allowed to use hounds, but in the upper part of the state they're not. There's no way a person could fight his/her way in there to where the deer are!
      I'm not ignoring the rules. I'm interpreting the rules. Tamal, The Great British Baking Show

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      • #43
        the video below would worry me if I lived in British Columbia. This guy has footage of what appears to be several coyotes living in or around his area that have become FAR too comfortable around people. Did you notice how close the jogger came to him and he didn't notice? Yikes!
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-4Ij9kwfdxk
        We hear coyotes but don't often see them in our area, probably because we have a large group of hunters that put a lot of pressure on them all year around AND because we are surrounded by state game lands.
        One year an avid hunter and his son bagged a coyote, and since it was winter, hung it on their open porch from the rafters. They lived on the main street in town. A neighbor called in a complaint and it pissed him off so he and his friends brought down more coyote and hung them up. They had probably 6 or 7 hanging up. They finally took them down, but it was a statement about the population around our area that they could get this many over the course of a few months. I don't worry too much, but I would still not leave my cats outside or my dogs unattended (coyotes or not).

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        • #44
          Originally posted by Bluey View Post
          Living in a wildlife preserve, we don't kill any one, predator or prey,

          We may have to start doing some damage control with feral hogs, that have started to move in the past handful of years and are becoming a problem for all, the native wildlife and humans.
          Can you shoot the feral hogs? I know they're becoming a problem in the midwest too.

          A lot of cattle farms near me have guard donkey and guard llamas.

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          • #45
            I feed one of my herds in a large field, pretty far from the farm buildings. In the evenings I've wondered what would happen if a predator visited. I figured, being flight animals, the horses would leave me in the dust to deal with the coyote/bear/mountain lion (very rare, but my husband saw one the next field over).

            Last summer, this happened. A large coyote appeared at the top of the hill (200 feet away?) and walked towards me and the horses (I was putting feedbags on).

            Far from running away, they all got very tall and snorty and walked very deliberately towards the coyote. The coyote took one look and trotted away.

            Yay horses!
            https://www.facebook.com/SugarMapleFarm
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            • #46
              Originally posted by LauraKY View Post
              Can you shoot the feral hogs? I know they're becoming a problem in the midwest too.

              A lot of cattle farms near me have guard donkey and guard llamas.
              Yes, but normally, in a wildlife preserve, you let nature take it's course, some species thrive at times while other crash, depending on several factors.
              With native wildlife, they go by cycles.
              When you introduce a very aggressive and fast reproducing species like feral hogs, all bets are off.

              Guard animals I don't think would work here, too many acres to guard and cows do take good care of their calves on their own, best they can.
              Feral hogs are menacing and shortsighted and will chase anything, there is not much you can do to guard from them once aroused to fight.
              It is nothing to pull up to a windmill and see over a dozen of them tearing it all around there, like someone took a big plow to the ground.

              Comment


              • #47
                Originally posted by JSwan View Post
                Actual farmer, in.

                Calves are not bite sized.

                You cannot keep calves in your house. Nor can you keep entire herds up near your barn, surrounded by concertina wire.
                You are quite correct and I do not have any issue with a farmer protecting their livestock, i.e. income/investment. Dealing with problem animals on an individual basis is a completely valid approach to take. My vet also raises beef cattle and some years, a few coyotes will move in during calving season and attempt some thievery, sometimes successfully. He promptly takes out these unwise individuals and is justified in doing so. That is why our agency has a special hunting category for depredation which economically impacts farm owners.

                What is not appropriate is demonizing a species (which I know JSwan is NOT on that team) or encouraging irrational fear. Five coyotes are quite talented at sounding like 30, as bluey pointed out.

                And no, coyotes are not significantly impacting deer populations in the Carolinas. It would be nice if they were as whitetails are quite overpopulated due to the loss of large predators like mountain lions and the explosion of handy edge habitat resulting from land clearing and making tasty lawns. Unfortunately, agency policy decisions are not always made based on the best science and any program popular with the public, such as one handing out a scapegoat, will persist, sometimes in sheer lunacy, as long as upper management thinks it makes them look good.
                Life doesn't have perfect footing.

                Bloggily entertain yourself with our adventures (and disasters):
                We Are Flying Solo

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                • #48
                  Thanks, wildlifer. Agree completely.


                  Originally posted by wildlifer View Post
                  What is not appropriate is demonizing a species (which I know JSwan is NOT on that team) or encouraging irrational fear. Five coyotes are quite talented at sounding like 30, as bluey pointed out.

                  .
                  Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                  Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                  -Rudyard Kipling

                  Comment


                  • #49
                    We are all vacc. the horses for rabies, yes?

                    Comment


                    • #50
                      Originally posted by csaper58 View Post
                      We are all vacc. the horses for rabies, yes?
                      You know, I never used to, on the advice of my old vet. He retired, and Young Vet recommends vaccinating for rabies, so I do now.

                      I was real glad of that last Friday night. I went down to Conjure's pasture and at first thought someone's dog was hanging out around his feet while he grazed. Then I got a little closer and saw it was a big old raccoon! Who promptly shinnied up the nearest tree at the sight of me. Conjure didn't like his new friend nearly so well once he was twelve feet over our heads, so at least the encounter accomplished something.
                      I'm not ignoring the rules. I'm interpreting the rules. Tamal, The Great British Baking Show

                      Comment


                      • #51
                        Wow! Sure had a mess of coyotes nearby last night. Hope the neighbors cats are ok.
                        Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Goethe

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                        • #52
                          We vaccinate for Rabies - have for more than a while now.

                          I also get a text alert whenever a rabid anything is found within a certain mile radius of our place - 150 miles, maybe?

                          Anyway - I like the post about 5 coyotes sounding like 30. All of the ones I've encountered were shy and surprised to see us, VERY quickly turning tail and disappearing. Yes, people saw them at dusk & dawn, usually on the tree lines and only once or twice coming near a dwelling that was WELL off the road.

                          What's most ridiculous in our situation is that FIL takes out all coyotes but my MIL is feeding the birds on the back porch...some of the "birds" are possums and a pair of - as she puts it - "the most beautiful pair of big raccoons you ever saw"

                          So very ridiculous...

                          Comment


                          • #53
                            Originally posted by threedogpack View Post
                            the video below would worry me if I lived in British Columbia. This guy has footage of what appears to be several coyotes living in or around his area that have become FAR too comfortable around people. Did you notice how close the jogger came to him and he didn't notice? Yikes!
                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-4Ij9kwfdxk
                            We hear coyotes but don't often see them in our area, probably because we have a large group of hunters that put a lot of pressure on them all year around AND because we are surrounded by state game lands.
                            That Coyote does not appear healthy, or to be behaving in an natural way.

                            We have lots of coyotes around here (like more than 20 can be heard some nights) - and I can tell you they are fairly shy, and do not display signs of mange or disease like this guy. I would have called animal control out to deal with a coyote with mange, out in broad day light, stocking people and their pets!
                            APPSOLUTE CHOCKLATE - Photo by Kathy Colman

                            Comment


                            • #54
                              Originally posted by Appsolute View Post
                              That Coyote does not appear healthy, or to be behaving in an natural way.

                              We have lots of coyotes around here (like more than 20 can be heard some nights) - and I can tell you they are fairly shy, and do not display signs of mange or disease like this guy. I would have called animal control out to deal with a coyote with mange, out in broad day light, stocking people and their pets!
                              In the city, they are probably far less shy. He didn't act sick to me, but he sure was bold.

                              Comment


                              • #55
                                I find that there are usually more coyote sightings during mating season. I walk my two large Bouviers every morning and we have come very close to some. One of my dogs is very obedient and stays by my side. The other often will go after the coyote who makes a quick exit. Fortunately my dog comes back very quickly after I call him. If I see the coyote before my dogs do I will change direction. On one of these occasions the coyote made his exit through the horses' pasture where he was promptly chased out by one of the horses.

                                Now that mating season is over they seem to have disappeared. One thing I am grateful for is that they have completely eradicated the groundhog. Used to have tons of them with lots of nasty holes for the horses to step into.

                                Comment


                                • #56
                                  Originally posted by ToTheNines View Post
                                  Oh for heaven's sake. I have coo-existed with coyotes for years on my farm. I do not leave kitties and chickens and other defenseless animals unprotected. That is my duty. Pretty soon with all this fear and killing of wildlife, there will be nothing left in the world but people, cats, dogs and bugs.

                                  I love to hear the coyotes. I also consider them to be helping me keep a natural balance for pests like possum, coons, skunks, and feral cats.

                                  If you must have domestic animals, consider that it is your duty to protect them. It is not that difficult people! And don't leave their food out to attract wildlife and them complain when possums and the like show up.
                                  Same here. I like hearing them and as long as they don't seek out my animals, they are okay to roam.

                                  We did kill one that came right up to the house and stared at a cat through the kitchen window - he was unusually big and bold, and we'd lost 2 of our fearless, dog-friendly cats that week.

                                  And yes, the coyotes here look like mixes of dogs or wolves - they look nothing at all like the scrappy, fox-like coyotes in CA, where I grew up.

                                  Comment


                                  • #57
                                    Originally posted by Finzean View Post
                                    What's most ridiculous in our situation is that FIL takes out all coyotes but my MIL is feeding the birds on the back porch...some of the "birds" are possums and a pair of - as she puts it - "the most beautiful pair of big raccoons you ever saw"

                                    So very ridiculous...
                                    Awww, man, that's like someone lining their deck railing with Krispy Kremes but if I try to grab one, they shoot at my head! But the donuts are so tassssty....
                                    Life doesn't have perfect footing.

                                    Bloggily entertain yourself with our adventures (and disasters):
                                    We Are Flying Solo

                                    Comment


                                    • #58
                                      Originally posted by californianinkansas View Post
                                      Does anyone have donkeys as livestock guardians? I frequently see donkeys advertised out here as LSG.
                                      Best Regards,
                                      Amber
                                      Yep - I have a mini and a small standard. We are in the country of NE PA and across from a mountain where you can hear the coyotes at dusk.

                                      I didn't get the donkeys specifically for guarding (DH wanted the mini, and he needed a friend, of course!) but they definitely keep the coyotes at bay. They don't even like my small standard Poodle, but will tolerate him in the field if he is with me.

                                      I never worry about the coyotes coming down off the mountain. I am thankful to have them, especially as I am breeding my mare this year and she will be foaling out at home.

                                      Comment


                                      • #59
                                        That coyote in the video looked a little mangy but otherwise Ok. was shedding out his coat. I think he was kind of bold but he was more curious than anything. Wehave alot of coyotes in the park where i walk my 3 dogs. I have had them bark and /or follow us on the trails. They are very curious and will smell the trail where we walk and leave their scat on the trail. They are only dangerous when they have puppies and are denning in the springtime. I have come across them after they killed a rabbit and they left their kill when we came by and then circled back to get it.
                                        Now my dogs are trained not to go after them but im sure if my dogs chased them or were out in the park alone the coyotes might go after them. I do respect them as wild animals but i think people do overeact to them. Some people say a coyote chased them when in all reality it was probably just curious and following them.
                                        Now the funny thing a couple of months ago we came across 3 deer that stood their ground with my 3 dogs and me and my friend. One of my dogs started to chase them and they did not run. they faced us down and my dogs came back and kind of hid behind me and were not sure what to do. We saw them again the next day and the same thing happend. I have never seen deer be so bold and not run away from dogs and people.

                                        Comment


                                        • #60
                                          I read an article that stated the eastern coyote has cross bred with wolves and are therefore larger and more aggressive than the western coyote. There have been incidents where people were attacked. There was a jogger in eastern Canada that was killed by coyotes.

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