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PA/NJ People, give me a very very very ballpark estimate

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  • PA/NJ People, give me a very very very ballpark estimate

    The farmette I was looking at sold but perhaps it was meant to be because I found a much much nicer house on much more land. I'd have to build a barn and fence. I'm trying to get a VERY VERY VERY ballpark idea of cost for this. VERY ball park. I'd also like input on what I could "subtract" from my "wish list" to save money, especially thing that wouldn't be too hard to add back in later down the line when we can afford to.

    In an IDEAL world, I'd like a 5 stall barn with three 12x10 stalls, two 12x12 stalls, and the remaining space for a wash stall and small feed/tack room. Plus a separate building for hay. So I think I'm looking at in the neighborhood of a 36x20 barn and maybe a 14x20 separate shed. I feel pretty insistent that I want dutch doors out of all the stalls and enough of an overhang to act as a run in area on both sides.

    In an ideal world, I'd say stonedust under mats for the stalls and concrete in the aisle, wash stall, and feed room. Would tamped dirt be ok to save money? I have heard from several people that concrete is through the roof! I assume dirt would be fine for the hay shed. If you put a building down on dirt, is pouring concrete later difficult? Or instead of a shed, how about a run in that size and I can hang a tarp over the front to protect the hay from getting wet?

    For turnout there are roughly 8 flat acres contiguous. Currently hayed and I'd like to have that option going forward. So I'd like to fence about 1/2 acre off each side of the barn as a sacrifice area opening into the 7 acres split right down the middle. If I can't afford that, I guess I could fence the entire perimeter and split it up with interior fencing later?! But then I can't keep the horses off the hay while it's growing. I know the Amish build barns, do they fence too?

    For riding, ideally I'd like to put footing in, fence around it, and add lights. I KNOW I can't afford that now. So think I can put up maybe one light for now and a small chain fence and later expand out.

    Miscellaneous questions...

    Is there an economical way to have someone do ALL of this (grade for barn, install barn, pour concrete, and fence). Do the Amish do "all in" projects like this? Can you get financing? Where and what does it include? Can you get financing and still go Amish, somehow? What's the most economical way to do this.

    And then the ultimate question... general ballpark to do this? Especially for the bare minimum I'm suggesting.
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/

  • #2
    I'm not in your area but will give you a few quotes from what I got when I was looking at building a barn. Barn size was 48 long by 36 wide, 4 stalls on one side, the other side would be a tack room and hay storage. Morton quoted me $70,000 for basic plain barn with stalls and nothing else. National Barn was around $36,000 for 4 stalls and a tack room with a few extras, like overhangs on the stalls. Of course Morton is high quality and National a lesser quality but certainly more affordable. There are some manufacturers in your area that make premade barns (shed row type) that are delivered already assembled. Do a google, I kept getting hits for them but didn't do me any good where I'm at, I'm guessing they may be far more affordable. If you and your SO are handy and have friends that are also handy you could do some of the site prep yourself - though it would require equipment rental and a lot of work. We have put our own fencing up, it is a lot cheaper but is hard work. The last 6 acres we paid someone else to do it, 3 rail wood for 2100 feet was $10,000 and that was the low bidder. You could put up electric tape much cheaper and replace with wood yourself at your own pace. Hope that helps, since I noticed you were getting a lot of looks but no replies to your post.
    "My treasures do not chink or gleam, they glitter in the sun and neigh at night."

    Comment


    • #3
      V, it's been a while since I priced out the kind of set up you are describing, but at the time, I thought Horizon offered a great option. They are pre-fab barn builders whose structures end up looking just like a traditional stick-built barn. I know they offer 12 x12 and 10 x12 stall options.

      They are in PA so I'd imagine the shipping would be reasonable, too.

      http://www.horizonstructures.com/bar...orse-barns.asp
      **********
      We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
      -PaulaEdwina

      Comment


      • #4
        The Amish do fencing - very nice fencing. I boarded at a farm that had additional paddocks fenced by the Amish while I was there - they brought someone who was not Amish (to drive the truck and work the auger on the tractor to dig post holes). In all, the job was done very quickly and professionally.

        I'm not sure if you can have a barn built by the Amish, I would think some do that kind of work.

        I would nix the idea of a run in with a tarp hanging to keep hay dry - one good wind and your tarp is blowing across your land. Liability if ends up on a road (or a driver's windshield).

        I'm going to contact the barn owner I referenced above to see who in the Amish community did her fencing. I know she added on to the barn as well - I'll get some names & PM you.

        It might be a good idea to speak with farm owners in your area - there may be local contractors that are familiar with the grading needs of a barn, concrete, etc... I also wouldn't go with tamped dirt in a hay shed or feed room - moisture always comes up from the ground & you'll end up with a row or two of moldy hay (ask me how I know - I had tarps over the dirt, then pallets, then the hay - and STILL lost hay).

        Whereabouts in NJ are you? The barn I'm referencing is in Somerset County. PM if you like.

        Comment


        • #5
          I have 11 acres and we bought a used barn (MD modular barn) off of craigslist (36x72) and then put up a 30x50 equipment/hay shed. My set up sounds a bit like what you are hoping to do.

          We have sacrifice paddocks on either side of the barn with stonedust foot. They split in the middle so there are two small paddocks per side and they are 36foot wide and 40 ft long. I can have two horses in each small paddock or four one one side if the middle gate is open. My slow feed hay feeders are in the small paddocks offering 24x7 eating.

          From there we have a gate that opens up into the fields but the fields are divided. If you look down the middle of my barn there is a dividing fence so I have three fields on the left and two fields on the right. There is a chute on each side that leads back to the barn (water/hay) and we can close each field off and just have one open so that we rotate a field every week. They are on a field for a week and then move to another field with just closing a gate.

          When we first moved we had the Amish put in a perimeter fence only. I went with no climb with a white flex board on top and strand of hotwire inside. It was $11k. We did the dividing fence ourselves with horseguard fencing but I personally HATE it. It is ugly, breaks easily and we are constantly fixing it. We have slowly been replacing it with the no climb fencing which hasn't required any maintenace in 6yrs.

          I did a 100x200 ring with lights and it was $20k. The contractor who built my ring also does concrete, field grading, seeding and more.

          sacrifice paddocks with gate in the middle to make two paddocks or one larger paddock on each side of the barn
          http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5100/5...4e791eb393.jpg
          http://www.benchmarksporthorses.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            V - give Bridlewood Builders a call. Terry and Robin are awesome. Terry is a horsewoman (she bred Tally) and knows barns. They do custom houses, but she'd really love to do a barn. They are awesome about working with your budget. And she has an amazing eye for pointing out things you miss and didn't realize you need, or configuring things in a really practical way.
            http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

            Originally Posted by JSwan
            I love feral children. They taste like chicken.

            Comment


            • #7
              We had a shell put up by Groffdale barns ( I think, not 100% sure because it was a while ago). We finished the inside ourselves using the Woodstar grillwork and tongue and groove wood. I think the shell itself was around $13,000 for 34 X 42. They made openings for dutch doors for 6 stalls and we bought the doors from Woodstar. I wouldn't recommend them for outside dutch doors but the grillwork has worked well for us.
              If you do it this way, you can build the stalls as you need them (or can afford them). We did buy all the grillwork at once because shipping was so expensive. I added the overhangs a few years ago and I had someone private build them for $5,000. The other companies quoted $10,000 to add overhangs to an existing barn.

              I store my hay in a 12 x 20 shed that we bought from Stoltzfus structures for around $1,500. It stores about 185 40# bales. Don't do a dirt floor. I used to use pallets inside my shed but that was a hassle and took up a lot of space. Just leave a "cushion" of hay down and that works well.
              Get the biggest structure you can for hay storage. You will need it for multiple horses.

              We did perimeter fencing on back 6 acres a few years ago by JMar fence. They were awesome. We did Cenflex fencing with a single strand of electric between 1rst and 2nd rails. Posts were pounded in. I think the bill was around $13,000. Well worth it and I absolutely love this fence.

              If you check out the pitchforkchronicles website below the farm and stable section shows my setup and also info on composting, etc. NJ requires manure management for any farm so you will need to plan for that, too.
              http://thepitchforkchronicles.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by vxf111 View Post

                In an ideal world, I'd say stonedust under mats for the stalls and concrete in the aisle, wash stall, and feed room. Would tamped dirt be ok to save money? I have heard from several people that concrete is through the roof! I assume dirt would be fine for the hay shed. If you put a building down on dirt, is pouring concrete later difficult? Or instead of a shed, how about a run in that size and I can hang a tarp over the front to protect the hay from getting wet?.
                My older barn is dirt floors with stonedust & mats. Works perfectly fine. You can also mat the aisle instead of concrete.

                Hay shed I would use a garage door. They aren't terribly expensive, easy to get up out of the way so you can get airflow in there if needed. I don't have any hay on dirt floor, but from what I understand, you do tend to have more mice then usual.

                Please, set up your pastures for rotational grazing. Use one or two center aisles that are gravel/shale/stonedust. This can double as a turnout during winter. If you put a water source there, it slows down erosion around the trough. Do one acre pastures, with a good solid gate off of the aisle way. Once your horses get used to moving from pasture to pasture, they LOVE it. And the wind, rain and birds tend to take care of manure management for you

                I know you want to leave your hay making option open, but if you do, find out from the person currently leasing it if they are willing to hay inside a fence for such little acreage (big acreage to us horse people, not so much to hay people) it is harder to use hay equipment inside fencing. Easier if they are round baling instead of squares.

                Speaking of round bales, if you are intending to feed them, you might want to make your hay shed wider instead of deeper. JMO

                It is a great time to build farm structures. Not much building going on (at least in my part of PA) so you should be able to get some competative bids.
                Facta non verba

                Comment


                • #9
                  Get yourself a copy of Lancaster Farming and get some bids from one of the many pole barn builders listed there. They should be able to give you a ball park figure on what you need. PM me if you want to know the name of the company we used. We've been in the barn 9 years and have been very happy with the quaility.
                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                  I'm not an outlier; I just haven't found my distribution yet!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    We did a lot of our own fencing (post and rail). It wasn't too bad with the help of some friends. PM me if you want to borrow our post-hole digger

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      So many responses! Thanks y’all…
                      Originally posted by js View Post
                      I'm not in your area but will give you a few quotes from what I got when I was looking at building a barn. Barn size was 48 long by 36 wide, 4 stalls on one side, the other side would be a tack room and hay storage. Morton quoted me $70,000 for basic plain barn with stalls and nothing else. National Barn was around $36,000 for 4 stalls and a tack room with a few extras, like overhangs on the stalls. Of course Morton is high quality and National a lesser quality but certainly more affordable. There are some manufacturers in your area that make premade barns (shed row type) that are delivered already assembled. Do a google, I kept getting hits for them but didn't do me any good where I'm at, I'm guessing they may be far more affordable. If you and your SO are handy and have friends that are also handy you could do some of the site prep yourself - though it would require equipment rental and a lot of work. We have put our own fencing up, it is a lot cheaper but is hard work. The last 6 acres we paid someone else to do it, 3 rail wood for 2100 feet was $10,000 and that was the low bidder. You could put up electric tape much cheaper and replace with wood yourself at your own pace. Hope that helps, since I noticed you were getting a lot of looks but no replies to your post.
                      The more responses I get, the more it sound like the fencing is the one part maybe I should at least partially take on myself. Am I handy. No, I am not. I am a hard worker though. And if I had someone to show me what to do, I’d get it done. But I am not naturally a “fix it” kind of gal.
                      I am sort of anti tape, I just don’t like how it looks and I am not sure what my horses would do with it. And given that I will be bringing horses “home” for the first time, I’d like to eliminate risk/change and I feel like sticking to fencing I know will keep them in is one way to do that.
                      Originally posted by Lucassb View Post
                      V, it's been a while since I priced out the kind of set up you are describing, but at the time, I thought Horizon offered a great option. They are pre-fab barn builders whose structures end up looking just like a traditional stick-built barn. I know they offer 12 x12 and 10 x12 stall options.
                      They are in PA so I'd imagine the shipping would be reasonable, too.
                      http://www.horizonstructures.com/bar...orse-barns.asp
                      I got a quote from Horizon and right now they’re the leader. It doesn’t seem like they have a pre-fab that is precisely what I want but they have something really close. I got a quote in the $30,000 range and that doesn’t include site work/electric/plumbing/fencing though Horizon said they can do site work and electrical. I like their barns, very pretty looking and I have seen them around locally and they seem to hold up well.
                      One current stumbling block is that the county apparently only allows barns of 900 square feet (so 30x30) and I really kind of want a 32x36. We’re investigating getting a variance.

                      Originally posted by tarynls View Post
                      The Amish do fencing - very nice fencing. I boarded at a farm that had additional paddocks fenced by the Amish while I was there - they brought someone who was not Amish (to drive the truck and work the auger on the tractor to dig post holes). In all, the job was done very quickly and professionally.
                      I'm not sure if you can have a barn built by the Amish, I would think some do that kind of work.
                      I would nix the idea of a run in with a tarp hanging to keep hay dry - one good wind and your tarp is blowing across your land. Liability if ends up on a road (or a driver's windshield).
                      I'm going to contact the barn owner I referenced above to see who in the Amish community did her fencing. I know she added on to the barn as well - I'll get some names & PM you.
                      It might be a good idea to speak with farm owners in your area - there may be local contractors that are familiar with the grading needs of a barn, concrete, etc... I also wouldn't go with tamped dirt in a hay shed or feed room - moisture always comes up from the ground & you'll end up with a row or two of moldy hay (ask me how I know - I had tarps over the dirt, then pallets, then the hay - and STILL lost hay).
                      Whereabouts in NJ are you? The barn I'm referencing is in Somerset County. PM if you like.
                      Thanks! I am in South Jersey!
                      If the tarp is a bad idea, hope about keeping hay in ½ the garage. Assuming that doesn’t drive my significant other insane, I suppose that’s a “in a pinch” solution?!

                      Originally posted by Discobold
                      No clue but want to wish you luck. I'm stuck in Philly and green with envy

                      I do know quite a few people around here who have built barns so I'll ask around if you don't get answers here, but I think you will
                      Don’t be jealous… instead JOIN ME. I need to board one horse for the farmland assessment. 

                      Originally posted by Jleegriffith View Post
                      I have 11 acres and we bought a used barn (MD modular barn) off of craigslist (36x72) and then put up a 30x50 equipment/hay shed. My set up sounds a bit like what you are hoping to do.

                      We have sacrifice paddocks on either side of the barn with stonedust foot. They split in the middle so there are two small paddocks per side and they are 36foot wide and 40 ft long. I can have two horses in each small paddock or four one one side if the middle gate is open. My slow feed hay feeders are in the small paddocks offering 24x7 eating.

                      From there we have a gate that opens up into the fields but the fields are divided. If you look down the middle of my barn there is a dividing fence so I have three fields on the left and two fields on the right. There is a chute on each side that leads back to the barn (water/hay) and we can close each field off and just have one open so that we rotate a field every week. They are on a field for a week and then move to another field with just closing a gate.

                      When we first moved we had the Amish put in a perimeter fence only. I went with no climb with a white flex board on top and strand of hotwire inside. It was $11k. We did the dividing fence ourselves with horseguard fencing but I personally HATE it. It is ugly, breaks easily and we are constantly fixing it. We have slowly been replacing it with the no climb fencing which hasn't required any maintenace in 6yrs.

                      I did a 100x200 ring with lights and it was $20k. The contractor who built my ring also does concrete, field grading, seeding and more.

                      sacrifice paddocks with gate in the middle to make two paddocks or one larger paddock on each side of the barn
                      http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5100/5...4e791eb393.jpg
                      Oh, that’s super helpful and pretty much what I plan to do. Lucky you finding a barn on Craig’s List. My god I’d LOVE for that to happen, but I am not holding my breath it will.

                      Originally posted by MyGiantPony View Post
                      V - give Bridlewood Builders a call. Terry and Robin are awesome. Terry is a horsewoman (she bred Tally) and knows barns. They do custom houses, but she'd really love to do a barn. They are awesome about working with your budget. And she has an amazing eye for pointing out things you miss and didn't realize you need, or configuring things in a really practical way.
                      Will do, thanks!

                      Originally posted by mkevent View Post
                      We had a shell put up by Groffdale barns ( I think, not 100% sure because it was a while ago). We finished the inside ourselves using the Woodstar grillwork and tongue and groove wood. I think the shell itself was around $13,000 for 34 X 42. They made openings for dutch doors for 6 stalls and we bought the doors from Woodstar. I wouldn't recommend them for outside dutch doors but the grillwork has worked well for us.
                      If you do it this way, you can build the stalls as you need them (or can afford them). We did buy all the grillwork at once because shipping was so expensive. I added the overhangs a few years ago and I had someone private build them for $5,000. The other companies quoted $10,000 to add overhangs to an existing barn.

                      I store my hay in a 12 x 20 shed that we bought from Stoltzfus structures for around $1,500. It stores about 185 40# bales. Don't do a dirt floor. I used to use pallets inside my shed but that was a hassle and took up a lot of space. Just leave a "cushion" of hay down and that works well.
                      Get the biggest structure you can for hay storage. You will need it for multiple horses.

                      We did perimeter fencing on back 6 acres a few years ago by JMar fence. They were awesome. We did Cenflex fencing with a single strand of electric between 1rst and 2nd rails. Posts were pounded in. I think the bill was around $13,000. Well worth it and I absolutely love this fence.

                      If you check out the pitchforkchronicles website below the farm and stable section shows my setup and also info on composting, etc. NJ requires manure management for any farm so you will need to plan for that, too.
                      My manure management plan is to find a farmer (which is everyone who surrounds me) who wants manure and take it there/have her/him come pick it up when s/he wants. Is that not a plan?! LOL. I plan to build one of those 3 sided wooden doohickeys that you can use to collect manure and then I need to figure out if I can find someone who wants it or else will take it away for a price. I hope someone can use it. I am moving to farmland and contemplating being a farmer (part of the property is a fruit farm) so jeez, I would HOPE I could do something green and farm-y with the manure.

                      Originally posted by lawndart View Post
                      My older barn is dirt floors with stonedust & mats. Works perfectly fine. You can also mat the aisle instead of concrete.

                      Hay shed I would use a garage door. They aren't terribly expensive, easy to get up out of the way so you can get airflow in there if needed. I don't have any hay on dirt floor, but from what I understand, you do tend to have more mice then usual.

                      Please, set up your pastures for rotational grazing. Use one or two center aisles that are gravel/shale/stonedust. This can double as a turnout during winter. If you put a water source there, it slows down erosion around the trough. Do one acre pastures, with a good solid gate off of the aisle way. Once your horses get used to moving from pasture to pasture, they LOVE it. And the wind, rain and birds tend to take care of manure management for you

                      I know you want to leave your hay making option open, but if you do, find out from the person currently leasing it if they are willing to hay inside a fence for such little acreage (big acreage to us horse people, not so much to hay people) it is harder to use hay equipment inside fencing. Easier if they are round baling instead of squares.

                      Speaking of round bales, if you are intending to feed them, you might want to make your hay shed wider instead of deeper. JMO

                      It is a great time to build farm structures. Not much building going on (at least in my part of PA) so you should be able to get some competative bids.
                      All good advice. I am not a fan of the aisle due to the “running in and out like insane horses” business that went on at a place I boarded, I’d rather have the pastures open on to one another, if that makes sense. No aisle, just pasture attached to pasture.

                      The hay guy who currently does the farm wants to keep doing it and do round bales. Which I guess I’d sell. I have 2 friends who live in their neighborhood. They use a different hay guy and one of my friends has a much smaller and more chopped up property. He still seems happy to hay it so hopefully even if I fenced a bit, that hay guy would be willing to do mine.

                      Originally posted by apprider View Post
                      Get yourself a copy of Lancaster Farming and get some bids from one of the many pole barn builders listed there. They should be able to give you a ball park figure on what you need. PM me if you want to know the name of the company we used. We've been in the barn 9 years and have been very happy with the quaility.
                      Will do!
                      Originally posted by kcmel View Post
                      We did a lot of our own fencing (post and rail). It wasn't too bad with the help of some friends. PM me if you want to borrow our post-hole digger
                      I might seriously offer to rent it from you. I know it’s hard work in that its manual work, but how CHALLENGING is putting up fencing. Like, is it easy to goof up?!

                      Ack, this is so exciting. I got a bunch of barn quotes today. Working on the variance situation, fencing, sitework, plumbing, and electric now. YIKES EXCITING.

                      With all this work, thank god the house is ready to go!
                      ~Veronica
                      "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
                      http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/

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                      • #12
                        OP - regarding farmland assessment and using boarded horses to qualify: talk to your tax assessor. You may be better off leasing part of your land to a hay farmer for the farmland qualification. There are some interesting rules about how to divide your horse-boarding assets (pasture, fencing, barn) so that your boarded horse(s) are enough to qualify you... You may be lucky - some municipalities are easier to deal with than others.

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                        • Original Poster

                          #13
                          Originally posted by JanWeber View Post
                          OP - regarding farmland assessment and using boarded horses to qualify: talk to your tax assessor. You may be better off leasing part of your land to a hay farmer for the farmland qualification. There are some interesting rules about how to divide your horse-boarding assets (pasture, fencing, barn) so that your boarded horse(s) are enough to qualify you... You may be lucky - some municipalities are easier to deal with than others.
                          My plan for the assessment is a combination of hay, boarding, and berry farming. YES BERRY FARMING. Maybe I have lost my mind?! LOL.
                          ~Veronica
                          "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
                          http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/

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                          • #14
                            I have so very many thoughts on this subject...so very many.

                            A. Putting up split rail fence is not hard. If you have a tractor with an auger. It is tiring and frustrating, but doable.

                            B. You will need a tractor. A good one. With a front end loader and a 3 point hitch. We bought one new and it was the equivalent of a small car payment.

                            C. If you are going to want your manure to be useful, it needs to compost. And the poop needs to be separated from the bedding. Shavings don't compost well...at all, really.

                            D. Put a heated automatic waterer in your sacrifice paddock. You will thank me the first winter you don't have to deal with frozen buckets and stock tank heaters.

                            E. When you need to get the hell out of dodge or you might blow your brains out, I will farm sit for you.

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                            • Original Poster

                              #15
                              I just watched a "how to put up fencing" youtube and now I am very very skerred...
                              ~Veronica
                              "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
                              http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by vxf111 View Post
                                I just watched a "how to put up fencing" youtube and now I am very very skerred...
                                Find someone to pound the posts for you. Worth every penny in my book.
                                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                                I'm not an outlier; I just haven't found my distribution yet!

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                                • #17
                                  I ended up spending almost as much on fencing as I did on my barn! But I didn't have the wherewithal to do it myself, and I knew I wanted to get it done right in the beginning, rather than spend time and money on fixing what I'd screwed up. My fence is 4' no-climb with an oak sight rail - it's been up for almost a year and a half now, and I've had to fix ONE board that popped off.

                                  I did help put fence posts in for a friend several years ago - rented a post hole digger and tamped all of them in by hand, concreting corners. After that experience I'd definitely agree with apprider on at least getting posts driven in for you - it'll be worth it!

                                  WRT haying - check with the guy who currently cuts the hay and ask him what size gates he'll need you to have to get his equipment in, and make sure you have a way for him to get in easily with the equipment (I have a "road gate" that is accessible from the nearest road in one corner of my pasture. Just make sure you can padlock it shut!)

                                  Definitely shop around for barn builders - Morton makes beautiful barns, but they were VERY expensive, and not able to do exactly what I wanted. Prebuilts/modulars are cheaper, but definitely check out local pole building contractors, too. If they can't do the site prep, electrical, plumbing type stuff, they should have companies that they can recommend. When I built my barn, the local guys told me that if I had them do the concrete (which they subcontract out), they'd do the site prep for free. I also ended up getting a much better deal on the concrete than if I'd found my own contractor. Big win all around in my book.

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                                  • #18
                                    I just had my barn built by an amish crew- and it was financed through the bank and as construction proceeded he was paid in several draws. You just need them to write up an estimate and get it going with the bank. It works the same as any other construction company.

                                    That said- over the years I've hired several crews to do things and there is a vast range in craftsmanship and quality- so be sure to do your homework and hire someone who really knows their stuff. Looking forward to the tax refund in order to finish the barn interior- and by the way- yes, you can pour concrete in a fininshed building- they do it all the time.

                                    My barn

                                    Don't forget to figure for the cost of your driveway.

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                                    • #19
                                      Nice barn Plainandtall.

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                                      • #20
                                        I don't think putting in the post and rail is that hard (with a tractor and auger of course). It does take time and it helps to have an anal-retentive friend to do the measuring (although you really don't have to be super-exact). Just do one section at a time and you will be fine!

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