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Adding a sand mound in T/O

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  • Adding a sand mound in T/O

    Thinking of adding a sand mound to the pasture to help encourage rolling in that area.

    Anyone done this and found that it works? I would think the soft spot would be inviting for a nap/rolling etc. although, it seems for now the mud puddles are just as nice and don’t seem to bother them much, but my goal would be to try and keep him at least a little cleaner than he tends to be now.

    He really, really, really enjoys rolling in the nastiest, foulest spots he can find!

  • #2
    Mistyblue has a spot designed just for rolling. I think she has posted photos of it before.

    Comment


    • #3
      I have a sand pile right in front of my yard, in the horse pasture.
      Horses love it to roll and take naps.

      Order a small dump truckload, dump it there and they make their own bed on it.
      When I need some sand, it is handy to get a loader bucket or several right off it.

      Comment


      • #4
        I've always done it for Jet in his pasture. He seems to love it.
        Make sure you put it in a sunny spot so they can sunbathe.

        Comment


        • #5
          I have a paddock with firm crusher rock and a pile of yellow cedar sawdust just dumped in the middle. They have spread it themselves and lie in it, sunbathe, sleep and roll. I think rolling is essential for horses -nice and chiropractic. It beats them roling in their stalls and getting cast.
          Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique

          Comment


          • #6
            My guys have one, but they prefer the giant mud hole instead. This year I finally got tired of having to weed it and till it, so I let the grass take it over- yes, that's how little they used it.
            Rhode Islands are red;
            North Hollands are blue.
            Sorry my thoroughbreds
            Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :

            Comment


            • #7
              I did it by accident at my old place. I had a load of sand delivered so we could mix concrete near the barn. The remaining sand we just left in place. The horse/pony definitely enjoyed rolling in it!
              Where I'm at now, although it's not ideal, to let them out in one of the pastures I have to let them through the riding ring. They definitely like to roll in the riding ring. Not that it saves them from getting muddy elsewhere.

              Comment


              • #8
                I have one in both sacrifice paddocks. Initially it was overflow from too much sand in the indoor and I saw that the horses would use it to roll so I added another pile to the 2nd sacrifice paddock and have kept them up for the 23 yrs I've been at the farm. Of the current horses I have (2), one will usually use it to roll but may lie down to take a nap in the mud, whereas the other horse paws up little depressions, waits till they are filled with water, therefore mud, and uses that to roll. Both will usually roll in the indoor when I turn them loose in there.
                Sue

                I'm not saying let's go kill all the stupid people...I'm just saying let's remove all the warning labels and let the problem sort itself out.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I love watching them roll. Wish I could do this

                  Does anyone have one that scratches their belly before they get all the way up? My mom's aged mare used to this, and she had the big broodie belly. Killed me every time.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I've been wanting to do this, but am worried about sand colic. Have you had any issues with having it in the sacrifice lot?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have an "accidental" one, where we put a pile of very sandy fine gravel/screenings in our sacrifice paddock. I plan on adding sand this summer (the big warmblood LOVES to roll and scritch his tummy). I feed under my barn overhang on mats so no worries about sand colic. As long as you aren't feeding on the sand, it shouldn't be a problem, I'd think.
                      Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Hippolyta View Post
                        I love watching them roll. Wish I could do this

                        Does anyone have one that scratches their belly before they get all the way up? My mom's aged mare used to this, and she had the big broodie belly. Killed me every time.
                        I've got a horse that does that come summer. Initially we, his owner and I, thought it was from bug bites but last summer I managed to keep his belly completely free of bug bites. We've also thought it might be a dirty sheath, but even after it's been cleaned, he still does it. I describe it as he's 'humping' the ground!

                        As for sand colic problems, like CalvinCrowe said, as long as you don't feed them hay directly on the sand, you're fine. I give them a pile to roll in and my guy loves it. I just wish the other guy would use it rather than the mud. Sand is soooooo much easier to brush off than clay mud!
                        Sue

                        I'm not saying let's go kill all the stupid people...I'm just saying let's remove all the warning labels and let the problem sort itself out.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          What a timely thread!

                          How much does a luxury sand pit cost? Ballpark it. How many tons of sand for a, say, 16.1 hand gelding. He likes it soft and he's getting old so I want him to feel invited to roll all the way over.

                          You see, Old Man Slacker will hit the Big Two Oh on March 22. His BO just built an indoor and rudely informed him that he is not allowed to roll in there. No mixing business and pleasure because he's teaching little kids to ride. He can't believe it! I'm 3,000 miles away. He needs a birthday present.
                          Last edited by mvp; Jan. 20, 2013, 04:52 PM.
                          The armchair saddler
                          Politically Pro-Cat

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            mayfair
                            I've been wanting to do this, but am worried about sand colic. Have you had any issues with having it in the sacrifice lot?



                            If you don't put food on it, they won't ingest it. They only get sand colic from ingesting sand, they usually only ingest sand from eating off of it. But if you have just a sandy spot and don't feed them on or over it, they should be fine.


                            How much does a luxury sand pit cost? Ballpark it. How many tons of sand for a, say, 16.1 hand gelding. He likes it soft and he's getting old so I want him to feel invited to roll all the way over.
                            I put in a 15x15 sandbox/rolling pit and soup to nuts it cost $125 IIRC and took about 2 hours of work. I used the tractor front loader to scrape the ground roughly 13-15" deep in a 15' x 15' square. Called the local quarry and had 9 cubic yards of sand delivered and dumped into it. Smoothed it out with a rake, let the horses out and both made a beeline for it and rolled.

                            To keep it up I get about 3 cubic yards every 3 years or so.

                            I got the idea from some online friends who own/train race horses. They'd talk about these rolling areas they had, a round pen or outside small area filled with soft sand the horses would be let in to roll and how much the horses benefitted from it.

                            I *adore* mine. Best thing I put in here. Not only do the horses LOVE rolling in it, they nap there on cool/cold days too since the sand holds in heat. And sand shakes right off of them. I rarely have dusty horses since they roll mostly in the sand and not in dirt. Plus they're shiny as hell!

                            I have photos somewhere, I'll post them when I find them. It's pretty cheap and easy...might be a little more labor-intensive if you want the sand in a pit and don't have a tractor to dig it out. But plenty of people just dump sand right on the ground and that works too. Just put it in an area that rain isn't going to wash it away or water collect in it.

                            You jump in the saddle,
                            Hold onto the bridle!
                            Jump in the line!
                            ...Belefonte

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by MistyBlue View Post
                              I put in a 15x15 sandbox/rolling pit and soup to nuts it cost $125 IIRC and took about 2 hours of work. I used the tractor front loader to scrape the ground roughly 13-15" deep in a 15' x 15' square. Called the local quarry and had 9 cubic yards of sand delivered and dumped into it. Smoothed it out with a rake, let the horses out and both made a beeline for it and rolled.

                              To keep it up I get about 3 cubic yards every 3 years or so.

                              I got the idea from some online friends who own/train race horses. They'd talk about these rolling areas they had, a round pen or outside small area filled with soft sand the horses would be let in to roll and how much the horses benefitted from it.

                              I *adore* mine. Best thing I put in here. Not only do the horses LOVE rolling in it, they nap there on cool/cold days too since the sand holds in heat. And sand shakes right off of them. I rarely have dusty horses since they roll mostly in the sand and not in dirt. Plus they're shiny as hell!

                              I have photos somewhere, I'll post them when I find them. It's pretty cheap and easy...might be a little more labor-intensive if you want the sand in a pit and don't have a tractor to dig it out. But plenty of people just dump sand right on the ground and that works too. Just put it in an area that rain isn't going to wash it away or water collect in it.

                              [/INDENT]
                              Sold! Thank you. I'll forward the link for this thread to my BO and, as usual, Send Money.

                              So you think building this on flat ground, and whatever dirt you have is good enough? No need for a pit or any kind of base so that the Rolling Place stays up to snuff?
                              The armchair saddler
                              Politically Pro-Cat

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by mvp View Post
                                Sold! Thank you. I'll forward the link for this thread to my BO and, as usual, Send Money.

                                So you think building this on flat ground, and whatever dirt you have is good enough? No need for a pit or any kind of base so that the Rolling Place stays up to snuff?
                                We just dump the sand in a flat place and the horses spread it a bit and use the higher spots for pillows, doesn't need to be all flat and pretty.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by Bluey View Post
                                  We just dump the sand in a flat place and the horses spread it a bit and use the higher spots for pillows, doesn't need to be all flat and pretty.
                                  Yep, that's all I did also. This yr added more sand as it was getting thin. I didn't have a chance to even spread the one pile as my horse went out into it, almost up to his knees and immediately rolled. I did get the other one spread a bit before he had a chance to use it as well!

                                  Misty, you deserve a gold star for being even more anal than I am about their sand pit!
                                  Sue

                                  I'm not saying let's go kill all the stupid people...I'm just saying let's remove all the warning labels and let the problem sort itself out.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Yup, like Bluey said, lots of people just have a tri-axle load brought in and dumped on firm ground. You can even keep it in a pile at first and watch the horses play on it. They tend to play King Of The Hill, trying to run to the top and knocking each other off, LOL!

                                    I'd just make sure the spot you dump sand isn't muddy or gets really muddy. Because during wet seasons the water will run under the sand, turn the ground to muck and the sand may get stomped into the mud and you'll just end up losing it all over time.

                                    If the spot you want to put it gets muddy or is muddy, scrape it down with the tractor to remove the top soil. My secondary layer of earth here is a sand/clay mix. (if it's not ledge, granite or swamp, LOL) My entire sacrifice turnout attached to the barn has had all topsoil removed and was graded to keep water running off. The pit I dug out is right in front of the barn doors in the center of that turnout. It's on the relatively high end (gradual slope, not steep) so rain will run into it, but the lower end is a bit lower ad has one corner dug down a bit so the water runs back out again. If I dumped mine on top of the ground the rain would have spread it out too thin due to the slope.

                                    So on top of non-mucky ground or on top of grass is perfectly fine too and even less work. Easiest if you can pick a spot the delivery truck can back right up to.

                                    I found my photos...the newer photobucket layout takes me forever to look through my pictures for some reason. Here's mine the day we made it:


                                    This is literally 30 seconds after I let the horses out for the first time after finishing it. Max hit if first:


                                    Then the diva, Gal was right behind him:


                                    I think she rolled for a good 5 minutes. And wiggled and groaned and loved it. Must have felt good. She's the reason we put it in, she was rather large and really solid/big boned. She was also not one to lay down so we hoped this would entice her to.


                                    (disregard my wavy, funky looking fence. That was before we had it redone, back when my husband and I thought we could fence something on our own, LOL)

                                    I also have a street sweeper brush in that paddock. Another fantastic and cheap "turnout toy." The highway dept in most areas will give these away for free if you call and ask, then come and pick it up. They remove and replace these every few years on all trucks. (if you live where it snows) So the brush is free, then you just dig a post hole about 2' deep and lay the brush down with one end facing the hole. Dump 1-2 bag of quik-crete into the hole, dump a couple buckets of water in the hole, slide a 6'-10' post into the hole in the center of the brush and stand the brush up. (2 people or a tractor) The post will slide down into the quik-crete. Let it dry a couple hours and voila! Instant, cheap and easy automatic horse groomer, deshedder and scratcher!



                                    Between the sand rolling pit and the brush I rarely have to seriously groom my horses. And in spring that brush is The Hangout for all the nest building birds. They flock to it to grab all the shedding hair stuck in it, LOL!

                                    ETA: Found some more current photos.
                                    Here's before we refenced but you can see both rolling pit and brush:


                                    And here's right after someone who KNEW how to fence fixed what we tried to do, and you can see most of the paddock and the "turnout toys" in it. The lighter ground in front of the brush is the rolling pit and you can see the slight slope it has for run-off:
                                    You jump in the saddle,
                                    Hold onto the bridle!
                                    Jump in the line!
                                    ...Belefonte

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Misty, you deserve a gold star for being even more anal than I am about their sand pit!
                                      LOL...oh I have anal retention issues alright!

                                      But I'm also married to a man with mild OCD...so that doesn't help. HE goes out and rakes it smooth every time he's down the barn and sees roll marks or hoof prints in it.

                                      I have a small-ish place and my grass turnout isn't big enough to keep grass if I let them out there all day so I try to keep the sacrifice paddock interesting for them too. I'm hoping this spring to start working on another heavily wooded area, clearing the under-crap and saplings out and starting to fence it in for more, varied turnout options for the boys. It'll also stay tree covered so shady, cooler and less buggy in summer. I plan on setting it up like a Paddock Paradise time dealio or something.
                                      You jump in the saddle,
                                      Hold onto the bridle!
                                      Jump in the line!
                                      ...Belefonte

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        This picture is the only one I have uploaded
                                        It is several years old, at nap time on their sand pile:

                                        http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a2...sca8ae357.jpeg

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