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Possibly buying farm property....demolition question

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  • #21
    One thing I would do is haul away the old house, and when they excavate for the new house use that dirt, and probably more to fill in the old pool. And make sure they do a good job filling in the pool so you don't end up with a sinkhole later. I wouldn't put the house remains in the pool, for exactly the reasons gumtree outlined, and filling up a hole after houses, barns and fences are built and in the way could be a pain if a hole has to be filled in later because a sink hole forms. I would worry about what would happen after wood or other materials rot and collapse, or when dirt catches on something over a void and then collapses later.
    Last edited by JanM; Jan. 14, 2013, 09:42 PM.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White

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    • #22
      I would put the block and brick into the pool, BUT, I'd not be expecting to be able to use the area for equine use, not for quite some time. My rationale would be that it's cheaper to bust up the old place and fill the pool basin than to bust up, pay to have hauled away and then pay to haul in good dirt plus the pool apron and interior sides down a foot or so need to be broken up as well so that rubble will likely go in the basin. Really you'll have to do some computation and see which is more cost effective and then decide which makes you feel better as far as the potential sinkhole of the old pool. Sometimes money ain't everything.

      Having city water and sewer makes life SO much easier in some ways, congratulations and I hope you enjoy this process.
      Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
      Incredible Invisible

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      • #23
        If you have a hole (old pool) and a decent size tractor, and can do it quickly away from prying eyes, I would (DIY) knock down the existing house and place into the old pool as fill. We do most of our stuff ourselves but SO helped dad build his home and is now building our retirement home in Ky.

        The only other issue could be financing. banks finance with as little as 10% DOWN on land with a house, naked land is 33% down (around here). So once you financed with existing house you would either have to have a construction loan ready to go for new place or have paid the 33% down.

        (A friend did the "must build soon" for her land - I think it was within 2 years so not bad).
        Now in Kentucky

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        • #24
          Explosives are always fun.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by JanM View Post
            but it might turn out to be your one chance to get exactly what you want in a house.
            One of the things that is very stressful about building your own house is that you own all the mistakes. When you buy a house with something that's not quite right, you kinda go 'eh' but when you're building there's a lot of stress in trying to get all those things right, and there are thousands of decisions to make in various ways.

            So, if you build, let go of the perfectionism from the start. Decide on the things that are essential before you break ground and for the rest do the best you can, but accept that you cannot control every element.
            If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket

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            • #26
              Depending on your area you should check with the building inspection office in your area.............in our area when you demo a house you must get inspected to make sure it is free of asbestos......costs a couple of thousand dollars for the report. Depending on where and how much asbestos in your house it could cost $5000.00 to $50,000.00.

              The house we just recently had torn down only had asbestos in the lino in one tiny bathroom and the small kitchen.......it cost $3,500.00 to have it removed before we could demo.

              Same with renovations that require a permit.........because of this renovating is going to get a lot more expensive in the future as more and more places are going to require that you prove there is no asbestos in the house prior to any work being done.

              Dalemma

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              • #27
                One hint I found out through watching my friend rebuild after a tornado demolished their home, was to see as many builder home tours, and open houses that you can, to see what size spaces, ceiling heights, and other features look like in real life. Room sizes and configuration are very hard to visualize from a plan, but when looking at a real room you can get a better feel for traffic flow and if the room size works. If there is something like a tour of new homes that a lot of communities have in the spring, then that's a great way to see a ton of houses, and the admission money usually goes to local charities. I went on a tour with friends, and we saw at least 20 houses in one day, and they went from affordable to really expensive, but it gave us an idea of what size rooms, and what features they liked.

                And make sure garages are deep enough, tall enough, and the doors work for the size vehicles that many of us have. There is nothing as irritating as building what you want, and finding out that the garage is too short, and the ceiling and door make it difficult or impossible to park your trucks or other vehicles, especially when you are away and they need to be secured.
                Last edited by JanM; Jan. 15, 2013, 08:25 AM.
                You can't fix stupid-Ron White

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                • #28
                  On the property we bought the fire department wouldn't do a controlled burn because of lead/asbestos issues. As we left the fire chiefs office he said to let them know when we burned the house so that they wouldn't send a crew.

                  Once the house was burned we had the excavator bury the metal/stone remains out in the woods.

                  I guess its the advantage of living in an extremely rural area.
                  A person is smart. People are dumb, panicky dangerous animals and you know it.

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                  • #29
                    Another option to seriously consider is a pre-manufactured home.

                    Order house, get plans, get contractors to build foundation, run water and electrical to site, wait for house to show up on back of couple of flatbeds, hoist and bolt house sections to foundation and each other, connect utilities at each joint of the house, furnish.

                    I oversimplify, but not by much.

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                    • #30
                      We did what callabero suggested and went with a modular. Was completed within a week by a crew that had never done one before. So much easier to have it already done and hubby who used to build houses says he would never build one from scratch again.

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                      • #31
                        The other possible benefit to prefab/modular is that you could possibly see what you are buying before building/buying it. Getting back to Change Orders: often these are a builder's road to "RIP off"; but on the other hand, there is no reason that you cannot expect a firm price on a change prior to committing to it. Sometimes you need to correct an error before it gets stuck with you...just be prepared to be available 24-7 when the building starts. Waltzing in after the builder has completed some phase, then changing everything around because you don't like it will likely be reflected in the final bill. Some changes like extending a foundation "2 more feet out that way" are not easily accomodated after the first floor deck is completed. Coffee and donuts can win a lot of goodwill...we once did an indoor all winter where the HO showed up with his own steamin cup of jo every other day...we never once saw a cup of coffee the 6 months we were there.
                        I would recommend burning the house if they will let you, then burying the unburnt in the old pool.

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                        • #32
                          Modular homes from a good, reputable company are better built than stick homes.
                          They are built indoors, they are built to withstand being moved without cracking too much and no one has to use what they have on site, even if it doesn't quite fit, rather than "go get more of that".

                          You have to be sure they are the right modular homes the banks that will appraise them and loan on them, the local tax office and inspectors will recognize as real, modular homes, not mobile homes.
                          The resale value later will depend on that.

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                          • #33
                            This is what I am talking about re prefab/modular: http://methodhomes.net/

                            There is absolutely no doubt that this is not a trailer or mobile home.

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                            • #34
                              Interesting twist on this thread. The OP asked if anybody has had any experience with demolishing an old house and the cost. A few comments have offered up some experience and a bit of advise to the question/topic. But it seems the majority of comments have been on how to go about building the new house, filling in the swimming pool, which hurts because we would love to have one, type of house and just about everything else other then answering the original question. How much would it cost? Which is why I have been checking back for my own education. In my school days I seem to remember being told that I was off topic a time of two.
                              Just saying…

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                              • #35
                                I made my suggestion that OP think twice based on a friend's experience, he knocked down dilapidated farmworker housing - demolished it - and discovered that he now had to make all his construction meet new codes, from the sewage disposal system on up including setbacks. He just couldn't do it and ended up with farmworkers living in travel trailers instead. I'd prefer to be warned about things like that myself.
                                Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
                                Incredible Invisible

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  Originally posted by gumtree View Post
                                  Interesting twist on this thread. The OP asked if anybody has had any experience with demolishing an old house and the cost. A few comments have offered up some experience and a bit of advise to the question/topic. But it seems the majority of comments have been on how to go about building the new house, filling in the swimming pool, which hurts because we would love to have one, type of house and just about everything else other then answering the original question. How much would it cost? Which is why I have been checking back for my own education. In my school days I seem to remember being told that I was off topic a time of two.
                                  Just saying…
                                  That's because demolition isn't the expensive part of the proposed project. I will go so far as to say it will be less than the change orders on the final new house. The cost is also very local.

                                  In some regions, there are strong new requirements that are attempting to reclaim/recycle building materials from demolition, doing more of a deconstruction than a rip/tear/smash, in order to keep materials from landfills.

                                  But, there are a lot of inobvious considerations involved that again, vary by region, which the OP may not have considered. I don't think the thread has gone off topic at all.

                                  Something like a brand new house needing a state of the art new septic system rather than the adequate and otherwise grandfathered existing septic could increase your building costs by $50k or more. That's the kind of thing that's easy to miss when looking at property.

                                  OP says the house is block and brick construction, which is probably ideal for an easy teardown-and-fill-hole situation. When we had a wood-frame garage in the way, we ended up cutting it loose from its foundation, bracing it, and dragging it with a tractor to a new location. We got a shed instead of a pile of debris or lumber.

                                  I always appreciate it when people answer the questions I didn't know enough to ask.
                                  If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    Originally posted by ReSomething View Post
                                    I made my suggestion that OP think twice based on a friend's experience, he knocked down dilapidated farmworker housing - demolished it - and discovered that he now had to make all his construction meet new codes, from the sewage disposal system on up including setbacks. He just couldn't do it and ended up with farmworkers living in travel trailers instead. I'd prefer to be warned about things like that myself.

                                    Yup. THAT's the thing to be wary of. People have experience with this. And it's awfully of you to criticise people for helping out in ways you don't know exist.

                                    Comment


                                    • #38
                                      this is a modular house



                                      if OP is in an area that requires permitting... if they keep at least 51% of the original structure normally the rebuild is classified as a remodel

                                      If you tear it down then everything is required to be rebuild using current codes

                                      as burning then burying the remains ... if in the future an environmental review is made for a future sale, that buried junk may have to removed, plus its surrounding soil

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                                      • Original Poster

                                        #39
                                        I did think this got off topic But also appreciate all the off topic suggestions that were brought up.

                                        I was just looking for a figure on demo and haul away to plug into my overall project expense/costs: 1) land cost 2) cost to demo old house 3)cost to build small new house. A friend said it would probably run 30k...I suppose I was hoping to hear people say it could be done for less. This all rests on whether or not we could get the property for the land value alone on a rock bottom low cash offer....chances are slim such an offer would be accepted, but the proximity to work and good neighborhood location are too good not to at least TRY to get the property. FYI bulldozing the house into the pool is a great idea, but the small backyard pool would probably only contain about 15% of the house structure. And yes I'm aware this area would not immediately be suitable for horse turnout But eliminating the house would free up the entire front yard area for pasture (and we could fence off the immediate demo plot while the ground settled and grass grew in)

                                        To anyone who brought up concerns about financing, my wonderful long time friend aka second family does mortgages so I feel great about anything she says, and she says it's do-able

                                        All of this to say we are now at a stopping point because I want to break up with our Realtor....the realtor issues could be their own thread. But if anyone has a recommendation for a realtor in the Raleigh area who understands the horse thing and who can spare some time for folks with a relatively small budget, do tell.

                                        Comment


                                        • #40
                                          Be careful with the former realtor's contract. Around here some realtor contracts state that if you buy a property they showed you, or were involved in the purchase of, you still have to pay commissions to them.
                                          You can't fix stupid-Ron White

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