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Economical & visually appealing fencing options?

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  • #21
    I've got the coated wire like SLW - on 6" round posts set 12' apart.
    3 lines of wire set below a top rail that is a 4" wide 2-wire "plank".
    Top line of wire can carry a charge, but you could also use that lower to keep the dogs out.
    It is now 8yo and the middle line of wire - the one the horses poke through to graze on the "greener grass" could use some retensioning, but still looks fine, not saggy.

    I also like the looks of the electrobraid and would probably use that if I did any more fencing.

    My fences were done professionally, but I have friends who did the electrobraid themselves and it looks good.
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
    Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015

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    • Original Poster

      #22
      As much as I'd love an entirely wood fence, as Calvin said, the cost would be astronomical!

      Glad to hear that "field fence" and 2x4 welded wire haven't killed anyone's horses -ours don't really bother the fence much as long as the top strand is a hotwire. The COTH safe-fencing police would likely have a conniption fit if they saw what we have currently, redneck fencing at it's best.

      Dog containment would be a luxury - but isn't absolutely necessary. As I said, they are supervised anyway and don't wander - front half of the property isn't fenced at all.

      Comment


      • #23
        Heinz - we've got the coated wire like SLW and 2Dogs for our perimeter fence and 1/2" tape for our cross-fencing. We used the Gallagher Equifence with wood corner posts and capped t-posts for the runs (set 20' apart). We did it ourselves 4 years ago and it still looks new. We have 3 lines set at 48", 36", 24"- the top line is white for visibility and the other 2 are black. All of our strands are hot. The dimensions are roughly 500'x220' square, with one of the short sides no-climb instead (see below).

        Our dogs are both big and the 24" strand mostly keeps them either in or out. If we were really concerned about it I'd add another strand at 12" and as long as it was hot I think that would contain them.

        We did 4' 2"x4" no-climb for the backyard for the dogs - shared fenceline with part of the pasture. I ran a strand of the hot coated wire along the top to keep the horses from leaning on it. There's also a short run of no-climb on the shared fence between the sacrifice paddock and chicken yard and that SHOULD have had a hot strand at the bottom as well to keep the horses from stepping on the wire to get the grass. That 60' run needs to be completely replaced/redone at some time from being stepped on and used for scratching.

        So, I guess, while the no-climb is a "prettier" fence I find the coated wire to be fare more practical.

        Comment


        • #24
          My favorite piece of fence is no-climb with the Ramm flex fence rail on top (like the centaur someone else linked to, just a different brand) but I wouldn't call it economical.

          I use horseguard in the back, which is nice because I can move it around and it's affordable. But, I'd much prefer to have it all in flex fence if I could.

          The other factor which will change the economics quite a bit is whether it's a straight run or a bunch of corners and gates. Every corner or turn or endpoint is expensive with any kind of tensioned fence. For a really short run, pipe panels or board fence starts to look attractive just because the simplicity of installation and the lack of need for concreted and braced posts saves more than the cost of the boards.

          I personally wouldn't put field fence in for horses without an inner fence to keep them a couple feet away from it. The savings - compared to everything you're going to put in in labor and the cost of the rest of the fencing materials - is just not large compared to one simple vet visit.

          Also, there's the option of one kind of fencing for your driveway/roadside/curb appeal and a different kind for the back.

          The other advice (first heard here!) that I still deeply value was to go for a 5' fence. The taller fence keeps them from leaning on it and will thus make it lower maintenance.
          If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket

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          • #25
            We (or should I say I) am leaning towards rubber fencing.

            Here is the website I have stumbled across.

            www.rubberfencing.com

            I think the 2 inch is much more visually appealing than the 1 inch.

            1in at 70 feet per "roll" is 10cents per foot ( +shipping)
            2in at 30 feet per "roll" is 20center ( +shipping)

            Really, your costs are going to come from the posts and not the fencing.

            Comment


            • #26
              Originally posted by Heinz 57 View Post
              Glad to hear that "field fence" and 2x4 welded wire haven't killed anyone's horses -ours don't really bother the fence much as long as the top strand is a hotwire.
              Just noticed this... of course horses have been gravely injured in field fence. (Horses have been gravely injured in *every* kind of fence!) You can mitigate the risk but a top strand of hotwire (which keeps horses from leaning over) isn't necessarily sufficient - the issue is feet going through it. Any scenario where horses might find themselves with a foot against the fence is of concern. Larger pasture, offset internal hotwire, those things help.

              As for the welded 2x4 mesh fence that comes on a roll - don't bother. The horses will push against it even a little and the welds will break. You'll have to replace it in no time.
              If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket

              Comment


              • #27
                Welded Wire Question

                I am putting 3 board along our driveway and about 200 feet of road frontage and had thought about putting 36" welded wire on the outside of the posts (boards would be on the inside/animal side of the posts and top and bottom would have electic on it too). Do you still think this would be bad? I was hoping to put a few hair-breed sheep out in the pasture to help with grazing. I intended for the electric to be the primary deterent, but the welded as a back up on the outside. Also want the welded to deter random dogs from going in the pasture (not a current issue, but you never know).

                I just *really* didn't to mess with the posts/tension necessary for a field fence on this part of the run, since I was already doing 3 board. It is also very curvy and a bit hilly there, so field fence would be difficult. I am thinking I will do a true field fence on the rest of the pasture, continuing the two strands of electric tape.

                Thoughts?
                DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #28
                  Originally posted by poltroon View Post
                  Just noticed this... of course horses have been gravely injured in field fence. (Horses have been gravely injured in *every* kind of fence!) You can mitigate the risk but a top strand of hotwire (which keeps horses from leaning over) isn't necessarily sufficient - the issue is feet going through it. Any scenario where horses might find themselves with a foot against the fence is of concern. Larger pasture, offset internal hotwire, those things help.

                  As for the welded 2x4 mesh fence that comes on a roll - don't bother. The horses will push against it even a little and the welds will break. You'll have to replace it in no time.
                  I think you took my post out of context. I was directly referring to the COTH'ers that had posted about their unapproved fencing and the lack of injuries that have resulted.

                  I am not naive enough to think there is ANY type of fence ANYWHERE that no horse has ever been injured on.

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Originally posted by Heinz 57 View Post
                    I think you took my post out of context. I was directly referring to the COTH'ers that had posted about their unapproved fencing and the lack of injuries that have resulted.

                    I am not naive enough to think there is ANY type of fence ANYWHERE that no horse has ever been injured on.
                    Also missed where I've had it up for four years now (in a smaller area, not a pasture) with no damage to it from naughty, grass-seeking equines.

                    Comment


                    • #30
                      I've posted about this before. This is my mom's fence. Love it! It isn't the cheapest, but helps if you get rough sawn lumber from an old farmer up the street (he has a little sawmill). My mom put a single strand of electric along the top, since the horses don't bother with it anyway.
                      http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphoto...25039212_n.jpg
                      Proud owner of Belle- 17.2h PerchxTB-wannabe dressage horse & Fayah 14.1H arab-trail horse extroidinaire!

                      Comment


                      • #31
                        Originally posted by SuperAlter View Post
                        We (or should I say I) am leaning towards rubber fencing.

                        Here is the website I have stumbled across.

                        www.rubberfencing.com

                        I think the 2 inch is much more visually appealing than the 1 inch.

                        1in at 70 feet per "roll" is 10cents per foot ( +shipping)
                        2in at 30 feet per "roll" is 20center ( +shipping)

                        Really, your costs are going to come from the posts and not the fencing.
                        Wow, really? Did you see this thread? I wouldn't even consider rubber fencing based on that feedback.

                        Comment


                        • #32
                          Originally posted by Heinz 57 View Post
                          This is what we were leaning towards, but I wasn't sure how economical it would be. We'd like something functional for the horses that will appeal to a variety of horse people, but that still looks nice, since we plan to sell the place in a couple years.

                          That's what we did - keeps our dogs (and horses) in and neighbor's dogs out.

                          We did fencing ourselves and buying 'no climb red wire horse fence' in large 330" rolls is the most economical way - also buying poles in quantity (local logging company) is also very economical.
                          Now in Kentucky

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                          • #33
                            ran across these as I'm in the same situation, but haven't used it personally- "adapter" cost may cancel out the t-post idea (as someone mentioned- may not be much more to just do 3 board), but looks like a cool idea and has a top wire mount.

                            Equi-Tee

                            Don't worry about your redneck fencing I'm still debating about even starting electric fencing as most of mine have never seen it, let alone cared about the fence unless they are coming to say hi when I get home.

                            Comment


                            • #34
                              One of the things to keep in mind is that the calculations are different based on whether you are adapting an existing fence line or putting in all new fencing. When I price it, the cost of a running element of fence is low compared to the cost of installing braced posts.

                              So you can get a roll of 4' field fence for $150 or you can get 4' no-climb for $199 or 5' no-climb for $250... and at the end of the day the differences in your total are probably going to be less than $1000 over a very large bill and the result will last longer and be safer... perhaps saving you a $1k vet bill and a fencing do-over if you have an entanglement.

                              Now, if you're comparing it to not buying a roll of fencing at all, then the financial considerations lean much stronger towards keeping it and adding some strands of electric inside of it.

                              By the way, before considering the rubber fencing, I'd look at the flex-rail systems from Ramm that are 1" and economical, or horseguard. JMHO.
                              If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket

                              Comment


                              • #35
                                i vote for Ramm Flex Fence or Centour type fencing combined with 2x4 No-Climb. Use PT posts. with "field fence" and steel posts you need to add in the cost of inevidable vet bills. I live in a location where the power is agurenteed to go out so electric just does not work --

                                Comment


                                • #36
                                  Wire mesh with an oak board on top will be almost maintenance free for 30+ years. The rest is a never ending battle ($$) to maintain.

                                  Comment


                                  • #37
                                    Vote for no-climb here. We had a company install Red-Brand mesh and love it so far. Probably debatable on the visual appeal factor, but we like it! https://mail-attachment.googleuserco...x2KnyeTEQgv0E4 and https://mail-attachment.googleuserco...WxpsU&sadssc=1

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