• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse
1 of 2 < >

Event Announcements now available FREE to all registered users

We just reconfigured the Event Announcements forum to be available as a free service for all registered forum users. See the thread stuck at the top of that forum for more information.
2 of 2 < >

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Generator - gas or propane

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Generator - gas or propane

    With all the crazy weather we are having I am looking into a generator. I know I want one that I can run the water pump, water heater, barn and about two rooms of the house off of. My big question is gas or propane. I have a propane tank but I am afraid that I might burn through the propane and the truck could not get up my drive to refill it and then I have no heat if the power comes back on.

    Does any have any recommendations. I think I need a generator about 7000 to 8000 watts. Still doing research.

  • #2
    Propane. It's a lot less maintenance and the fuel doesn't go bad like gasoline does.
    The inherent vice of Capitalism is the unequal sharing of blessings. The inherent virtue of Socialism is the equal sharing of miseries.
    Winston Churchill

    Comment


    • #3
      Hubby says propane for fuel but that the generator size you are looking at will be underpowered. If he were to buy one to power the equivalent at our place we would be looking at a 16,000-20,000 watt generator.
      Last edited by Crackerdog; Nov. 13, 2012, 02:08 PM. Reason: I'm a dork
      My blog: Crackerdog Farm

      Comment


      • #4
        Well, we have a gas generator in the size you are talking about. We didn't want to spend the bucks on a propane generator, but ours works just fine. We had a transfer switch installed and that together with the generator was about $2500. We have ten gas cans that I fill when I think I will need them. I use the gas for other things too (quad, lawnmower, and you can use it in the car if you don't want it to sit). Our generator runs the house heating system, water heater, well pump, refrigerators, microwave, television, a few plugs and some lights. It starts easily, and while noisy, we love it. Our neighbors have a propane generator and they paid upwards of $7000 for all of the same services, but their generator clicks on automatically, versus our which we have to wheel out from the garage and manually swap over. Their generator is about as noisy and consumes enough fuel that we would both run out at about the same time. Good luck!

        Comment


        • #5
          If your generator is bigger, think propane, maybe get it it's own designated propane tank, connected to the other, so you can use either in a pinch.

          That is what we did in our old farm house, that had a 1000g tank for heat and cooking and a 500 g for the 10K generator.

          Once we went all electric, propane deliveries became more questionable there for everyday use, all propane went to the generator.

          Gasoline is ok for the smaller generators, but the bigger ones run better on diesel or propane/natural gas.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by showidaho View Post
            but their generator clicks on automatically, versus our which we have to wheel out from the garage and manually swap over.
            I think this is a big part of your decision. A permanent set up or a temporary set up.

            Comment


            • #7
              Based on my own experience I would say "Propane - and go large." You can't have too much power in a generator. Nobody has ever said, after the power goes out and the generator goes on, "Oh, we shouldn't have bought the big one, we really only need the furnace and the well and three lights."

              Also, a generator that goes on automatically is a real blessing, because it will go on without you having to do anything at all. If you're sick or injured or laid up for any reason, you don't have to go and start your manual-start generator (possibly in the dark/cold/rain/wind). Also, if the power should happen to go out when you are not at home, for an hour or a day or a weekend, you're covered. In my own case, I feel much more secure now that I know my well pump is going to carry on working regardless of local rural power issues, so the horses (and the house, but that's secondary) WILL have water. Since I travel for clinics and lectures and such, there are times when I'm not at home, and there are certain farm-related responsibilities (water, for one) that are quite enough of a PITA for me, the owner - they ought not to be inflicted on whomever is farm-sitting!

              Our big generator does a self-test every Tuesday morning - it turns itself on for about fifteen minutes, then turns itself off again. The sound isn't annoying - it's reassuring. (Well, my dog initially thought that something Very Large was growling, because the sound of the generator powering off really is very much like a growl. It took him about four weeks to adjust, but he has learned that it's just another normal weekly noise, like the garbage truck beeping its way down the drive.
              Home page: www.jessicajahiel.com
              Horse-Sense newsletter: www.horse-sense.org

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Topper View Post
                With all the crazy weather we are having I am looking into a generator. I know I want one that I can run the water pump, water heater, barn and about two rooms of the house off of. My big question is gas or propane. I have a propane tank but I am afraid that I might burn through the propane and the truck could not get up my drive to refill it and then I have no heat if the power comes back on.

                Does any have any recommendations. I think I need a generator about 7000 to 8000 watts. Still doing research.
                Start by going here:

                http://www.yamaha-motor.com/outdoor/...or/sizing.aspx

                You can get an idea about the size that you need by adding up the wattage requirements of your various appliances.

                Now, do you need to run everything at once? No!!!!

                This is an emergency system. If you've got lots of money buy a big, whole house unit and you can thumb your nose at nature (at least for as long as the propane holds out). If you're like most folks then you're looking for a "bridge" to take you to regular power restoration. Get a bit creative.

                How about some specifics:

                Hot water heater: You only need it for a relatively short period of the day to wash up dishes, take showers, etc. So as you calculate need look for things you can turn off while the water heater is on.

                Well pump: In theory you can run this periodically by keeping drinking water in containers, barn water in tanks, etc.

                Heating system: If you're in a real cold weather zone then you'll need this more than other stuff, but even here you can "sequence" the run time, turn down your thermostat, and put on a sweater (or two).

                A/C System: Unless you've got a medical issue that requires it the A/C is off for the duration of the emergency.

                Refrigerator and Freezer: Turn freezer on for a couple of hours and then off. DON'T OPEN IT BUT ONCE A DAY!!!!! Keep the fridge closed except when necessary. If can make ice the put your day's supply of drinks into an ice chest; if you can't then drink stuff at room temperature except at meal time.

                Lights: Low draw, normally, but too many can strain the system.

                Appliances: Some, like "fast on" TVs, draw current constantly and be a bigger draw than you think. Unplug everything but one, regular TV. Anything with a resistance heater (coffee maker, griddle, toaster, etc.) gets run and then turned off. When one of these comes on something else might have to go off. You'll have to monitor your load. Also, unplug the computer, WiFi network, etc. Plug them back in and use only as required.

                Radio: low draw; keep it on for news and information.

                Barn: what do you need to have powered up in your barn during an emergency? Frankly I can't think of much. Turn the horses out and leave them out until the emergency is resolved.

                Wiring: If you want to do this the easy way then rewire what you want to use into one set of circuit breakers and the stuff that's not being used into another set. Then all you need to do to "monitor" your load is turn off one set of breakers. This will cost some money but may save money in generator capacity you don't have to buy.

                Being without power is no fun. I've been through four hurricanes on land and I can testify to that. We've been without power for as long as four days as a result of a winter storm. Didn't like that, either. Whatever you buy, unless you're flush, will not allow you to live the normal, profligate, American life style. Suck it up and live more simply if you've no electricity.

                G.
                Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

                Comment


                • #9
                  The advantage of propane is that under emergency conditions, if you have a decent sized tank, you can keep chugging along. Gas stops being available when the power is down because gas stations can'r pump either.
                  Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.

                  Remember the horse does all the work, we just sit there and look pretty.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Crackerdog View Post
                    Hubby says propane for fuel but that the generator size you are looking at will be underpowered. If he were to buy one to power the equivalent at our place we would be looking at a 16,000-20,000 kilowatt generator.
                    I just have to point out that 16,000-20,000 KILOwatts is 16,000,000-20,000,000 watts or, 16-20 Megawatts, or the same power output of 3-4 large diesel locomotives.

                    I don't think you need that much.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If you have an electric water heater, that would eat up most of you 7-8,000 watts...

                      There are generators out there that will run on propane, natural gas, and gasoline.

                      http://www.yamaha-propane-natural-gas-generators.com/

                      The whole house automatic backup generators have come down a lot in cost and would be a good option on propane.

                      Is your barn on the same panel as your house? If not, you will probably need 2 generators.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RAyers View Post
                        I just have to point out that 16,000-20,000 KILOwatts is 16,000,000-20,000,000 watts or, 16-20 Megawatts, or the same power output of 3-4 large diesel locomotives.

                        I don't think you need that much.
                        Ooops, my bad! Thanks for catching that!
                        My blog: Crackerdog Farm

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by RAyers View Post
                          I just have to point out that 16,000-20,000 KILOwatts is 16,000,000-20,000,000 watts or, 16-20 Megawatts, or the same power output of 3-4 large diesel locomotives.

                          I don't think you need that much.
                          I am sorry to disagree.
                          For a whole house, all electric, that would be about right for around 2000 to 2500 square feet, standard medium sized house.

                          Any less and you need to cut down on what you are using, which is fine also.

                          Our 10K was only servicing the mere basics in our house with propane heat, was not enough once we went all electric.
                          Electric furnace heat strips are greedy.

                          Our portable welder is also a gasoline 10K generator.
                          That is what we used, before we bought a real generator with a transfer panel.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            For a whole-house or "close to whole house" situation, Propane (or natural gas if available) is the way to go. For the former, you can always up-size the tank if there is discomfort with the supply situation.

                            My plan is for a 20kva natural gas whole-house implementation at earliest opportunity...losing electric means loss of water and septic, as well as other things like heat and light. The small portable generator I have kept our food fresh, the sump pump pumping and our communications up and running for the 5 days we were out from Sandy with our wood stove keeping us warm, but we absolutely didn't appreciate the lack of running water. Natural gas "just flows" for us so it's the logical choice for our generator needs.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              We live in the middle of nowhere. A whole house generator does the trick for keeping power to the water pump, my prime concern, and the whole house, too.
                              Ours runs on propane and has been a lifesaver during hurricane season.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by Bluey View Post
                                I am sorry to disagree.
                                For a whole house, all electric, that would be about right for around 2000 to 2500 square feet, standard medium sized house.

                                Any less and you need to cut down on what you are using, which is fine also.

                                Our 10K was only servicing the mere basics in our house with propane heat, was not enough once we went all electric.
                                Electric furnace heat strips are greedy.

                                Our portable welder is also a gasoline 10K generator.
                                That is what we used, before we bought a real generator with a transfer panel.
                                Read what was written. They said you need a 16,000 -20,000 KILOWATT generator.

                                There is a difference between a KILOWATT and a WATT. About 1,000 times as a matter of fact. You, specifically, have a 10 KILOWATT generator. 1,000 KILOWATTs is 1 MEGAWATT.

                                The generators on diesel locomotive put out 5,000 KILOWATTS. If you ask for a 20,000 KILOWATT generator, they are going to look at you VERY funny. Even our research buildings don't have generators that big. At the hospital, yes, we have 2 20,000 KILOWATT generators and they occupy 1/8 of an acre, including pad for underground fuel tanks.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  We are getting a smaller propane one. All we are really interested in keeping going is the refrigerator, a couple of lights and cell phones. We already have gas (propane) fire and stove and are on city water (on a farm, which I still think is weird).
                                  We're spending our money on horses and bourbon. The rest we're just wasting.
                                  www.dleestudio.com

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by RAyers View Post
                                    Read what was written. They said you need a 16,000 -20,000 KILOWATT generator.

                                    There is a difference between a KILOWATT and a WATT. About 1,000 times as a matter of fact. You, specifically, have a 10 KILOWATT generator. 1,000 KILOWATTs is 1 MEGAWATT.

                                    The generators on diesel locomotive put out 5,000 KILOWATTS. If you ask for a 20,000 KILOWATT generator, they are going to look at you VERY funny. Even our research buildings don't have generators that big. At the hospital, yes, we have 2 20,000 KILOWATT generators and they occupy 1/8 of an acre, including pad for underground fuel tanks.
                                    Right, now I catch that.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by Jim_in_PA View Post
                                      losing electric means loss of water and septic, as well as other things like heat and light.
                                      Confused, how would losing electric make you lose septic. Do you have a sewage grinder pump or something? Septic works on gravity and other than the people who decide to put a toilet room in the basement when their lateral invert is mid basement wall I do not know anyone who has a sewage grinding station and force main in their house so that is why I ask.


                                      Originally posted by RAyers View Post
                                      At the hospital, yes, we have 2 20,000 KILOWATT generators and they occupy 1/8 of an acre, including pad for underground fuel tanks.
                                      And those are usually diesel because diesel is far more efficient.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by RAyers View Post
                                        The generators on diesel locomotive put out 5,000 KILOWATTS. If you ask for a 20,000 KILOWATT generator, they are going to look at you VERY funny. Even our research buildings don't have generators that big. At the hospital, yes, we have 2 20,000 KILOWATT generators and they occupy 1/8 of an acre, including pad for underground fuel tanks.
                                        Are you in a flood risk area? If so, do you take any special steps to protect the tanks, pumps, and feed lines?

                                        G.
                                        Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X