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Please help settle domestic dispute - "kicking" horse poop around field...

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  • Please help settle domestic dispute - "kicking" horse poop around field...

    So my wonderful Mr.'s idea of spreading manure is to literally kick it to bits as hard as possible. We don't have a tractor, so proper manure spreading is out of the question, but I would prefer to pick all the poop and take to the dump (if we had a tractor I would love to make a poop pile for compost, but we don't).

    His poo kicking drives me nuts! but I don't know if I have reason to be driven nuts over this.

    Is kicking it helpful at all? I wonder if it just makes a wider area that the horses don't want to graze from.

    Help please! Thanks

  • #2
    Its great fertilizer...

    Comment


    • #3
      Well, if the horses are continuously grazing on the field, then yes... most of the time they won't eat where poop is. However, if you're rotating the pastures and giving them a couple of months rest between grazing, spreading the poop out and allowing it to break down into fertilizer can be helpful. I am no scientist and do not know the exact time frame, but we give our pastures 3 months off after grazing for 2-3 months and most of the poop is gone and horses seem to have no problem grazing on it -- and we spread the poop out immediately after taking them off the pasture.
      Creek Ridge Farm
      Trakehner Horses

      Comment


      • #4


        poop= fertilizer.

        Some farms take the poop from the barn and spread it across the pasture!

        if you bother to pick up the poop, you can build the compost pile for the garden instead of hauling it to the dump (which is wasteful, really)

        besides, that's a good walk spoiled while it benefits your farm: the poop gets broken up (=no flies) the grass is fertilized and hubby exercised.....

        Plan on gong for a ride when he gets to sh**-kicking....
        Originally posted by BigMama1
        Facts don't have versions. If they do, they are opinions
        GNU Terry Prachett

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        • #5
          it'll dry out faster that way, so less flies

          just don't let him wear those shoes in the house afteward
          www.destinationconsensusequus.com
          chaque pas est fait ensemble

          Comment


          • #6
            You don't need a tractor to make a compost pile, I do mine all by hand.

            I pick my poop and compost it. My horses keep designated potty spots around the compost piles so I don't have to wander far to pick. I will some times wing a wet patty pile out across the pasture instead of picking it, but then I find my horses will start crapping there too.

            If your paddocks are like mine, no rotation option and small enough that you're trying to use every available inch, then I'd say pick. But if you have room to rotate and give the area a break, then definitely kick! It is a good way to break down the piles quickly and minimize flies.
            Being terrible at something is the first step to being truly great at it. Struggle is the evidence of progress.

            Comment


            • #7
              The only issue I've heard in regards to spreading manure, and BTW DH drives over it on purpose with the finish mower - talk about muck slinging!
              is if you haven't got a good deworming protocol in place the manure will have an egg load and the eggs are often quite tough, and you'll have spread them all around in a thin enough layer that the usual habit of not eating around the piles won't be true. So you'll be happily reinfecting your horses.
              Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
              Incredible Invisible

              Comment


              • #8
                During the heat of the summer, spreading manure piles is the best way to kill worm eggs.

                Comment


                • #9
                  http://www.ker.com/library/advances/439.pdf Depends on your latitude and average temperature, at least according to this article. Picking it up and getting it out of there is the most favored solution.
                  Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
                  Incredible Invisible

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bucksnort View Post
                    So my wonderful Mr.'s idea of spreading manure is to literally kick it to bits as hard as possible. We don't have a tractor, so proper manure spreading is out of the question, but I would prefer to pick all the poop and take to the dump (if we had a tractor I would love to make a poop pile for compost, but we don't).

                    His poo kicking drives me nuts! but I don't know if I have reason to be driven nuts over this.

                    Is kicking it helpful at all? I wonder if it just makes a wider area that the horses don't want to graze from.

                    Help please! Thanks

                    If this is all you guys argue about, I think your marriage is in great shape.


                    Picking paddocks may be "ideal" but it is completely impractical. Picking paddocks is for adults with too much time on their hands or for young people who need an exercise to build character. It can be a healthy outlet for an obsessive personality. Since most horses don't graze the roughs, most farms just leave the manure to rot into the soil. It isn't worth $8-12 an hour to pay someone to pick paddocks unless you are obscenely wealthy.


                    Breaking up manure piles in the heat of the summer so that the sun can kill the parasite eggs is a good idea, but using a harrow can spread parasite eggs more widely over the entire field. Bottom line: if you must harrow your field, don't do it in the spring or fall or when you have horses on it.

                    I doubt your husband's manure kicking is having any practical effect one way or the other with regard to your pasture. Whether or not he should continue doing something that irritates you is more of a relationship question than a horse keeping one.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If you don't use Ivermectin wormer, the manure beetles will do your work for you, they say.
                      Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'm still trying to figure out what a tractor has to do with a compost pile...

                        When I bother to pile it, I pile it right into a raised garden bed and rake it a few times. Great stuff. Taking it to the dump is practically a crime. In the field, I kick it, if I bother with it at all. Kicking spreads it out to dry and disintegrate. The horses will eat there as soon as it's dried and starts to disappear, unless you have a really tiny paddock that they can't properly get away from that one little spot for a week or so. Then they get into the habit of religiously avoiding that area, at least IME.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The tractor part of the manure pile, for me, is the occasional turning and subsequent spreading of the pile. My pile from last year was 3 horse's worth and only what I got out of their stalls/run-in in the winter. It is a HUGE pile that I would never get turned or distributed by hand (yes, we made it by hand, one pile at a time, but gosh it sure gets big.)
                          I harrow my pastures, but my horses think it's cute to put poop piles in the corners where I can't quite get to them, so sometimes I'll take a fork out there, pick them up and give them a good fling. I guess that isn't much different than kicking the piles. Get hubby a fork so his shoes stay clean(er) and let him go at it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have chickens for just this purpose. They scratch through the manure and spread it out to dry. That equals fewer flies and fewer parasites. I have 4 animals on 5 acres. The horses have dedicated bathroom areas that they've established and they graze on the rest.
                            "My biggest fear is that when I die my husband is going to try to sell all my horses and tack for what I told him they cost."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Simple solution-feed oats

                              Go buy a bag of whole oats and give each horse about 1/2 cup twice/day. The hulls (NOT the whole oat) will come out in the manure and the birds will gladly pick apart each manure pile to get the hulls and very nicely spread it around.


                              Now, if hubby still wants to go kick manure fine but why not let the birds to the work and give him another job in the meantime.

                              I think you can also feed black oil sunflower seeds as well but I've never tried it so I don't know.
                              Sue

                              I'm not saying let's go kill all the stupid people...I'm just saying let's remove all the warning labels and let the problem sort itself out.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by msj View Post
                                Go buy a bag of whole oats and give each horse about 1/2 cup twice/day. The hulls (NOT the whole oat) will come out in the manure and the birds will gladly pick apart each manure pile to get the hulls and very nicely spread it around.


                                Now, if hubby still wants to go kick manure fine but why not let the birds to the work and give him another job in the meantime.

                                I think you can also feed black oil sunflower seeds as well but I've never tried it so I don't know.

                                LOL, actually some whole grains do make it through unharmed.
                                Originally posted by BigMama1
                                Facts don't have versions. If they do, they are opinions
                                GNU Terry Prachett

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Call me lazy, but picking and/or kicking down the manure piles in the pasture just makes my head hurt, and back!!

                                  I don't do a DARN thing to the manure in my pastures, but I do rotate the horses between 2 fields. I also have a very good ratio of acreage to horses, so the manure is never overwhelming to the fields. The horses get rotated every 3-4 weeks and then we mow. I find that the finish mower does a good job of spreading them, and even if it misses, sometimes the birds or dung beetles will make a good go at them. And sometimes the piles just stay there and eventually dry up. I'm 43 years old with a bad back, and I just don't have the body to withstand that much picking, and I don't own a harrow to break them up with.

                                  I don't even work my compost pile. It gets driven in a dump cart to the VERY far back of my property about 300 feet away from the barn so I don't have excessive flies, and it breaks down just fine without me touching it. I've had a pile that has not grown in size for the last 3 years. It just breaks down by itself as I add more, and stays the same size. I don't stable my horses a lot either, mostly just during the winter at night, so I don't have a lot of stall cleanings to dump all year round.

                                  I do a fecal egg count on my horses and worm as needed, but all I've had to do is Ivermectin for the bots because they have had ZERO fecal egg counts for the last 2 years on my lazy horsekeeping plan of action--LOL!

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Unless it gets very hot where you are, kicking the horse poop around is the equivalent of seeding you pastures with worm eggs.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by rcloisonne View Post
                                      Unless it gets very hot where you are, kicking the horse poop around is the equivalent of seeding you pastures with worm eggs.
                                      Not a good visual!
                                      If you lime the field after spreading manure, and keep horses off of it for a while, you should be OK. Otherwise, pick up manure. (All the yankee BOs down here do not pick up or spread manure or lyme or fertilize pastures. )
                                      Last edited by cloudyandcallie; Aug. 2, 2012, 03:59 PM. Reason: lime not lyme. I've read so much about lyme on this forum

                                      Comment

                                      • Original Poster

                                        #20
                                        Thanks for all the input! We just have two horses at home and both are on worming programs (but am I going to start doing the fecal tests I think) so I'm not overly concerned about the worms.

                                        We have about 3.5 acres of pasture that is divide into three. The middle one is a bit of a sacrifice pasture, I lock them in there at night with hay nibble nets, and then during the day I rotate between the other two every two weeks or so.

                                        I shall throw on my boots and join in on the kicking!!

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