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Badger family in my pasture, wtd?

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  • Badger family in my pasture, wtd?

    Yikes, I thought the sage rats were annoying! These things are huge, they look like 30+ pounds each and I have heard they are vicious and diseased. And they make giant holes! How do I get rid of them, shoot them? What kind of gun is that going to take? (I won't actually shoot them myself, but my farm hand could). Any other humane way to get rid of them? I'm a little nervous to get anywhere near the main hole!
    ******
    "A good horse and a good rider are only so in mutual trust."
    -H.M.E.

  • #2
    Contact a wildlife guy in your area.
    Badgers certainly have a nasty temper, not sure if they carry anything though, but you would not want to get up close and personal with one.
    Originally posted by BigMama1
    Facts don't have versions. If they do, they are opinions
    GNU Terry Prachett

    Comment


    • #3
      are you in North America or UK?

      Comment


      • #4
        Contact your local DNR, If your DNR cannot come out and remove the animals contact a legitimate pest control because many states require permits to move living animals. the best way to remove them is with live traps.

        Badgers will attack if Provoked.They are also INCREDIBLY fast. My grandparents had one with a den by their garage, and made itself known when it chased my grandpa up to the front door. Shooting them would probably be a challenge but if you did manage to kill the entire family fill in all the hunting holes and dens, and do badger prevention because if one family moves out another family will probably move in. You must have something attracting them, in my grandparents case it was a bird feeder that the squirrels used. They like rodents, insects and Little mammals.

        Comment


        • #5
          Also if you have cats or dogs outside be very watchful of them until the badgers are removed. Large badgers can kill coyotes and wolves. These are not friendly animals.

          Comment


          • #6
            Badgers are indeed nasty critters. One more thing to remember - you can bust a tractor or truck axle in a badger hole, think what it can do to your horses' legs, or yours for that matter. You can take one out with a .22 but a larger caliber, high power rifle makes the job easier.
            Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

            Member: Incredible Invisbles

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            • #7
              Does it look anything like this -- http://www.albinoblacksheep.com/flash/badgers ?

              Sorry, couldn't resist.
              Topline Leather -- Bespoke, handwoven browbands & accessories customized with Swarovski crystals, gemstones, & glass seed beads. The original crystal braid & crystal spike browbands!

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              • #8
                Be very careful, badgers are very mean and cranky on principle.

                I have heard stories about a cowboy and his horse walking by a hole, not realizing it was there and the badger coming out, grabbing and shredding the horse's leg in seconds.

                I was bulldozing a road and the dozer blade picked out a badger from a hole.
                That badger grabbed the edge of the steel dozer blade and scratched the steel, leaving marks on it.
                I was glad it decided to move on, not come up the machine to visit with me up there.

                We leave them alone, unless they are making holes in a dam.
                Badgers are not that plentiful here, kind of solitary.
                I am surprised they are staying around human dwellings.
                They don't do that around here, too much going on I guess?

                Comment


                • #9
                  I disagree that a Badger will attack without a lot of provocation. They just want to be left alone. We have them and many times I have gotten very close, not on purpose, and they will try to avoid you if at all possible. They will snarl and growl to warn, which certainly got my attention!! Just a few days ago I came upon a young one out in the open and I tried to get a picture of, but he/she wanted nothing to do with me.

                  I leave them alone. As an aside, I think the whole "horses will step in a badger hole and break a leg" is an old wives tale. We always have a few badger/fox holes in the fields. The horses will run around like lunatics and not step in a hole. I think the one thing horses are pretty good at is knowing where their feet are.
                  Patty
                  www.rivervalefarm.com
                  Follow us on facebook - https://www.facebook.com/pages/River...ref=ts&fref=ts

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Honey badger don't care... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4r7wHMg5Yjg ((Warning: Much profanity))

                    Can I recommend "rifle from safe distance" for 300?
                    Nudging "Almost Heaven" a little closer still...
                    http://www.wvhorsetrainer.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by NoDQhere View Post
                      I think the one thing horses are pretty good at is knowing where their feet are.
                      I wish they were a bit better at knowing where MY feet are... :=)

                      Yes, of course I know they're my responsibility...
                      Nudging "Almost Heaven" a little closer still...
                      http://www.wvhorsetrainer.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by NoDQhere View Post
                        I disagree that a Badger will attack without a lot of provocation. They just want to be left alone. We have them and many times I have gotten very close, not on purpose, and they will try to avoid you if at all possible. They will snarl and growl to warn, which certainly got my attention!! Just a few days ago I came upon a young one out in the open and I tried to get a picture of, but he/she wanted nothing to do with me.

                        I leave them alone. As an aside, I think the whole "horses will step in a badger hole and break a leg" is an old wives tale. We always have a few badger/fox holes in the fields. The horses will run around like lunatics and not step in a hole. I think the one thing horses are pretty good at is knowing where their feet are.
                        While you are right that badgers don't go out of their way to attack, what sets them off may be something you didn't know was going to set them off, like almost stepping on the shallow hole they were resting in.

                        I would definitely not bother one at all, they are lightning fast and once set off, very over the top aggressive, they meant to do harm.

                        I would want to discourage them from staying around dwellings.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Frizzle View Post
                          Does it look anything like this -- http://www.albinoblacksheep.com/flash/badgers ?

                          Sorry, couldn't resist.
                          That was the first thing to pop into my head when I saw the title of this thread.
                          "Is it ignorance or apathy? Hey, I don't know and I don't care." ~Jimmy Buffett

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            We also have them in our pasture. It's away and over a hill from our house and barn, so we never see them. I understand they're pretty much nocturnal. My husband has spent a lot of time out there with a gun hoping to see one, but nada. . . the only time was when he walking with our dogs and one of them stuck their head into a hole and as they were walking some distance away he turned around and saw it sitting up watching them ? We also have lots of ground squirels, which is what they eat and you find their big holes near all the little gs holes. So we go out routinely and fill all the holes we can, but they keep coming back. I have also heard they need to be live-trapped so that may be our next attempt to get rid of them.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Well Badgers ARE RELATED to the WORST of the Weasel family, the Wolverines!! I don't know ANY of the Weasel family that are not great fighters, totally fearless in attack and don't back down no matter what they face!

                              My friend had one Badger move into her garden, started eating the tame barn kittens out in the yard. It was starting to tunnel around, make itself at home, real close to the house. She couldn't get a clear shot at it near the wooded fenceline or unarmed when it was running across the grass. They will literally dig a hole under themselves and sink away if cornered, if they can't escape you or damage you.

                              Her dog managed to catch the Badger between holes and there was a FIGHT one night. Friend said it sounded horrible, took a while, she couldn't figure what dog had caught. Never thought of the Badger. Eventually the dog came up to the door. Dog had taken a whooping, but there was nothing left of the Badger larger than your hand. Fur and pieces all over the yard. She had to treat the dog's cuts to make sure there was no infection from bites or claws. Dog did end up with one scar line on her head. No eye damage or ripped ears.

                              Badgers are hard to fight, they have way oversized skin, can turn around 180 degrees when grabbed and HELD up, to attack facing you!! Getting hold of them just means you are REALLY CLOSE when they turn to bite!! All four feet have BIG, SHARP, digging claws for tearing things up. Dog was a Rhodesian Ridgeback female, with a firm sense of WHO owned THIS PLACE and the Badger didn't belong there.

                              She is the only dog I ever heard of winning a fight with a Badger by herself. Friend figured dog just shook the Badger to death while taking pieces out of the hide. If she lost her grip, hide came loose, she would grab the animal again to keep up the shaking. That was the dog's usual method, in removing other kinds of varmints she found. She could shake something faster than you could see it. Good method, keeps the varmint stunned and prevents a lot of clawing. Big jaws, strong neck and heavily muscled, gave her a LOT of power. This was a good sized Badger, probably about maximum size.

                              At that time, this was the ONLY Badger anyone had heard of in our area for years. Very uncommon locally, though not a rare animal in the state. Probably just not a lot of suitable habitat with all the farming there. I hope to NEVER meet one not caged.

                              OP should call the DNR as suggested, see what they can tell her or help her in removing it. You don't want to just shoot it, THEN find out they are protected so you get fined. Badgers take special cages to trap, because they are SO STRONG, they will break most lesser traps. Like their Wolverine relatives, they may not weigh much in total, but you want to multiply every pound by 100, because they have that much power and fury. They usually are solitary unless she has babies. A new litter would be rather too late in this season for having. Not enough growth time before winter.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                OP-- you definitely need to get more information before you go blasting a critter on your land! Call Fish/Wildlife or whatever it is called in your area. A quick Google search revealed that really, they aren't a threat to your livestock or even pets. They can be infected with rabies....but in the grand scheme of things, they are about as low on the "transmission" list as humans are. They eat rodents and insects, occasionally carrion, too.
                                Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  We had a badger family at our barn this spring, witnessed by a few different people, holes in several really bad locations (bad for us, at least!). They're protected around here, so we ended up getting the DNR guy to come out and look at the holes to give advice. By the time he came, they had moved on, and haven't returned. Kind of cool to think we had actual, real, native wildlife in an area that's getting increasingly built up, not so cool to think of them getting into it with the boarders' small dogs out for a trail ride. According to the guy who was charged with filling in the holes, they were BIG and DEEP.

                                  Comment

                                  • Original Poster

                                    #18
                                    Originally posted by goodhors View Post
                                    Well Badgers ARE RELATED to the WORST of the Weasel family, the Wolverines!! I don't know ANY of the Weasel family that are not great fighters, totally fearless in attack and don't back down no matter what they face!

                                    My friend had one Badger move into her garden, started eating the tame barn kittens out in the yard. It was starting to tunnel around, make itself at home, real close to the house. She couldn't get a clear shot at it near the wooded fenceline or unarmed when it was running across the grass. They will literally dig a hole under themselves and sink away if cornered, if they can't escape you or damage you.

                                    Her dog managed to catch the Badger between holes and there was a FIGHT one night. Friend said it sounded horrible, took a while, she couldn't figure what dog had caught. Never thought of the Badger. Eventually the dog came up to the door. Dog had taken a whooping, but there was nothing left of the Badger larger than your hand. Fur and pieces all over the yard. She had to treat the dog's cuts to make sure there was no infection from bites or claws. Dog did end up with one scar line on her head. No eye damage or ripped ears.

                                    Badgers are hard to fight, they have way oversized skin, can turn around 180 degrees when grabbed and HELD up, to attack facing you!! Getting hold of them just means you are REALLY CLOSE when they turn to bite!! All four feet have BIG, SHARP, digging claws for tearing things up. Dog was a Rhodesian Ridgeback female, with a firm sense of WHO owned THIS PLACE and the Badger didn't belong there.

                                    She is the only dog I ever heard of winning a fight with a Badger by herself. Friend figured dog just shook the Badger to death while taking pieces out of the hide. If she lost her grip, hide came loose, she would grab the animal again to keep up the shaking. That was the dog's usual method, in removing other kinds of varmints she found. She could shake something faster than you could see it. Good method, keeps the varmint stunned and prevents a lot of clawing. Big jaws, strong neck and heavily muscled, gave her a LOT of power. This was a good sized Badger, probably about maximum size.

                                    At that time, this was the ONLY Badger anyone had heard of in our area for years. Very uncommon locally, though not a rare animal in the state. Probably just not a lot of suitable habitat with all the farming there. I hope to NEVER meet one not caged.

                                    OP should call the DNR as suggested, see what they can tell her or help her in removing it. You don't want to just shoot it, THEN find out they are protected so you get fined. Badgers take special cages to trap, because they are SO STRONG, they will break most lesser traps. Like their Wolverine relatives, they may not weigh much in total, but you want to multiply every pound by 100, because they have that much power and fury. They usually are solitary unless she has babies. A new litter would be rather too late in this season for having. Not enough growth time before winter.
                                    Wow, what a story! That sounds like one heck of a dog! I have two Jack Russells who I'm sure think they could kill them but they would be in deep doo-doo with 5!. They are luckily far from my house where my Jacks hang out.

                                    I did call Fish and Wildlife, they are not protected in my area, (Oregon) and they just recommended I call pest control, who will come out and shoot them. It's a bummer, because they are large, interesting animals, but I can't risk having them around my horses.

                                    On the up-side, they did totally get rid of my sage-rat problem!
                                    ******
                                    "A good horse and a good rider are only so in mutual trust."
                                    -H.M.E.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      But...what is the risk around your horses?? If your land is large enough, I'd think that both badgers and horses could happily coexist. Seriously, the "fell in a hole and broke a leg" story is pretty much bunk---I'm betting your horses know exactly where that badger sett is ( a sett is a badger den/their holes) and give if fairly wide berth.

                                      Rabies is almost non-existent in Oregon, and certainly not a risk factor here.

                                      Can you simply coexist?
                                      Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by Calvincrowe View Post

                                        Rabies is almost non-existent in Oregon, and certainly not a risk factor here.
                                        Rabies may typically be "non-existent", but there were several confirmed cases in southern Oregon since 2010.

                                        I would try and find a way to have someone shoot it or move it on. I don't think they are an animal easy to co-exist with.
                                        Semi Feral

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