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This year's hay supply?

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  • This year's hay supply?

    I'm curious as to how the hay crop looks in other areas. Our area's outlook is dismal. My neighbor who has never bought hay as he always grows more than he needs has already bought his hay for the year - and didn't cut any. Most hay fields are not being cut as there isn't sufficient growth with the very dry condiions. Colorado people, I suggest you get your hay as soon as possible. How is Texas this year, and other sw areas?

  • #2
    Lots of rain here, so lots of grass. Our biggest problem on the west side of WA is finding a string of hot, dry days before the grass is too old. Summer begins here (the rain lets up) usually on July 5, then haying begins in earnest.

    On the east side, it looks like the cool, wet spring is slowing down the first and second cuts of alfalfa and orchard, but I expect a good crop again. I'm hopeful prices will stay the same as last year or be a bit lower. Gas/diesel has come down considerably here. (Of course, it took political intervention by the Governor and others to get them down, but that's another story!).

    So, for the parts of the country who import NW hay, it is looking pretty good right now!
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!

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    • #3
      Mid atlantic looks kind of dismal as we had an early spring drought. I'm having my first load delivered tomorrow and plan to stock up big time throughout the summer. I absolutely panic if I get into October without at least 9 months supply in the barn.
      Lowly Farm Hand with Delusions of Barn Biddieom.
      Witherun Farm
      http://witherun-farm.blogspot.com/

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Calvincrowe View Post
        Lots of rain here, so lots of grass. Our biggest problem on the west side of WA is finding a string of hot, dry days before the grass is too old. Summer begins here (the rain lets up) usually on July 5, then haying begins in earnest.

        On the east side, it looks like the cool, wet spring is slowing down the first and second cuts of alfalfa and orchard, but I expect a good crop again. I'm hopeful prices will stay the same as last year or be a bit lower. Gas/diesel has come down considerably here. (Of course, it took political intervention by the Governor and others to get them down, but that's another story!).

        So, for the parts of the country who import NW hay, it is looking pretty good right now!
        Actually, the first cutting in the lower Columbia Basin for the early cutting farmers is excellent, but high prices (grass or alfalfa). Had some rain after that and really cool weather, that late first cutting is toast. Timothy is about finished and all of it is fantastic...export quality means higher prices. Those that cut second cutting (grass or alfalfa) last week and got it up...its also excellent. Those that cut now and its down..if they bale today, great. Over the weekend...will have to see. Unstable, but warm air is over us and tstorms possible. That will mean spotty rain. For those farmers that wait until after the weekend, so far, the forecast is for excellent hay weather.

        I am getting in 2nd cutting orchard mix grass hay, its cut, baled and under hay storage. Premium stuff and the price reflects that. $230 ton plus expensive delivery. But, I will have a full barn of hay on Wednesday.

        Summary...lots and lots of excellent hay, lots of good and you pay dearly for it. Good for farmers for a change, too.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by craz4crtrs View Post
          Timothy is about finished and all of it is fantastic...export quality means higher prices.
          Not only high prices, but in my case, my timothy supplier decided not to sell to us "retail" folks this year. Not even producing small bales for us horse people. I'm sure it is the high export demand influencing this decision. Nice that they waited until NOW to tell us...

          I'm stocking up with some timothy from last year that tests low enough NSC for my IR horse, as I'm worried I won't find any for him now that my supplier bailed (or should I say baled?) out on me. And shopping for hay for the other guys.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by horsepoor View Post
            Not only high prices, but in my case, my timothy supplier decided not to sell to us "retail" folks this year. Not even producing small bales for us horse people. I'm sure it is the high export demand influencing this decision. Nice that they waited until NOW to tell us...

            I'm stocking up with some timothy from last year that tests low enough NSC for my IR horse, as I'm worried I won't find any for him now that my supplier bailed (or should I say baled?) out on me. And shopping for hay for the other guys.
            Where are you located? I know several farmers that bale in the 3 tie bales and are happy to sell the kickouts for a reasonable price. When I had IR horses, I would have it tested, but haven't in a few years. A lot of these guys will separate the non-perfect bales from the export stuff and sell it off to horse people. Message me privately if you are interested. You would have to make your own arrangements for hauling and testing.

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            • #7
              Ridiculously dry here, but we had a really warm early spring, so overall that may balance things out a bit. The neighbor's hay field doesn't look too bad though, all things considered. Most lawns are a crispy brown mess, the corn's small and peaked looking, but the longer grass/alfalfa is doing a better job of coping with the lack of rain so far.

              But I am glad that I bought my hay right at first cutting, when things were still looking up because of the abundant early growth.
              "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn’t merely train him to be semi-human. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming part dog."
              -Edward Hoagland

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              • #8
                Here in VA we are having a good year. A lot of the hay guys are into second cuttings already.
                A person is smart. People are dumb, panicky dangerous animals and you know it.

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                • #9
                  SWVA is having a good year. My grass hay guy got the first cutting all in and now that we're getting rain a second cutting will come too. He said we're good for this year. My alfalfa guy sold me 70lb bales for 3.75 yesterday. He's going to cut two more times so I'll have plenty of alfalfa too. The 1200lb roundbales of orchard grass mix I get are $30

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                  • #10
                    We're pretty good in GA. Mild winter lots of rain and now dry. I am awaiting the new cutting of coastal.
                    ... _. ._ .._. .._

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                    • #11
                      First cut just coming in here. Looks to be abundant, good quality and reasonably priced compared to last year. I have 100 bales of 40/60 alfalfa/grass mix arriving tomorrow morning I believe. It is very dry and hot here so I suspect second cut will not be as good, but we will see. I'm reserving it now if the stuff that comes in tomorrow looks good. (I like second cut to feed through the winter--more alfalfa.)

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                      • #12
                        I got all my needed hay a month ago. Now, the fields are starting to dry up like last summer.

                        Batten down the hatches we are all in for dry weather again.

                        In Bama.

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                        • #13
                          I'm in Colorado and my hay supplier just called me yesterday. She said yields are looking very low and prices are up 50% from last year. Fortunately, I ended up with a bit leftover from last year, but I told her that if she can get first cutting from the fields where I got last years, I'll take it. I'm not about to wait around to see if second cutting happens or not.
                          "Ponies are a socially acceptable form of child abuse." - said by a friend when asked if she was going to find a pony for her 5 year old daughter.

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                          • Original Poster

                            #14
                            It sounds good in the areas that normally have more rain. We ended up with 10 percent of our normal irrigation water on the early irrigation water and virtually no rain for months. I have some hay fields that are subirrigated and they are pretty nice so I'm in good shaper personally - just hope the prices don't go too high for the people buying, and I hope there is enough.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Trevelyan96 View Post
                              Mid atlantic looks kind of dismal as we had an early spring drought. I'm having my first load delivered tomorrow and plan to stock up big time throughout the summer. I absolutely panic if I get into October without at least 9 months supply in the barn.
                              That's funny around me they seem to be having a pretty good hay year and prices are just dropping like rocks. I've seen $3-4/ bale hay again (YAY!) and I paid $4/ bale for some pretty nice alfalfa last week.
                              "As soon as you're born you start dyin'
                              So you might as well have a good time"

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                              • #16
                                Craz4crtrs--I guess I should have said I get my hay from Central Oregon, and I think the weather has been a bit better there than in the Basin. My hay guy also does a lot of buying from Umatilla area as well. I'm an optimist, so I always hope the general trend is lower prices (reflective of the gas/diesel drop) and the supply of west side local hay being potentially good, if the 80's and dry predicted for the end of the next week really pan out.

                                The damn export market (sorry, I know hay growers need to make a buck too!) really makes horse owners in the PNW, especially on the west side, pay through the nose for quality hay. I avoid local, as I've yet to find any my boys will eat and stay "fat" on, without a ton of waste. I know there is quality local, but I'll trust my hay man to bring me consistently excellent eastern orchard/alfalfa--at a price! Too bad I don't know a grower over yonder and owned a 6 ton hay trailer I've often thought of going into the hay hauling business as I have summers off....but I don't think there's much profit to be made.
                                Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  I had to take timothy with a little alfalfa mix hay this year as my farmer's orchard grass wasn't available. First it was too rainy early to get in to cut it and then it got all yellowed and tough so he didn't cut any, at least not for his horse clients. Mind you his timothy is lovely just not as 'soft' as the orchard grass. Fortunately both horses aren't too old that they need the softer. I just like it a bit better.
                                  Sue

                                  I'm not saying let's go kill all the stupid people...I'm just saying let's remove all the warning labels and let the problem sort itself out.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Equibrit View Post
                                    We're pretty good in GA. Mild winter lots of rain and now dry. I am awaiting the new cutting of coastal.
                                    Same here in Alabama. My hay supplier said they have a bumper crop so far this year, but need rain now. I don't expect he'll go down on price even with diesel a little cheaper, but he didn't go up when diesel so high. He sells prime coastal to a few regular customers, glad I got in with him. He only sells the best for horse hay, I've seen him feed hay to his cows that was darn good horse hay.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Ontario, Canada has been hit with army worms that have decimated wheat and timothy growth and weevils that are attacking the alfalfa. We've just taken first cut off in 3 stages. The first stage was fine - no worms or weevils in evidence. The 2nd and 3rd stages that were done last week - WHOLE nuther ballgame ... the equipment was covered and choked up with squashed worms and the fields are littered with them

                                      SOme of the wheat fields, you can drive by today and all looks fine and by tomorrow, it looks like the fields has been harvested, but it hasnt. The worms decimated the crop overnight

                                      My second cut off the 1st stage looks to be coming in well and healthy. The worms should have entered the larvae stage by the time we are ready to do 2nd cut, so if the weevils have gotten the Hell out of town, we should be okay. I should be able to get the 3000 bales I need from the fields and the fellow that cut for me should be able to get his portion as well

                                      From anyone and everyone I have spoken with in this area as well as several hours away in every direction, they figure their yields will be 1/3 - 1/2 of what they have been in previous years. Some that have newly seeded fields have exactly "0" growth - the worms have eaten everything as it was coming up so its wait and see if it will bounce back and recover or they will have to plow under and re-seed their fields again

                                      This wont just affect Ontario either. A lot of our hay production gets shipped south of the border and overseas. It is NOT a pretty picture at all up here right now ...
                                      www.TrueColoursFarm.com
                                      www.truecoloursproducts.com

                                      True Colours Farm on Facebook

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                                      • #20
                                        Central KY- first cutting was awesome but just a bit later than I would have liked due to wet conditions. But now it's turned off dry- not a good thing. Still need another 4-500 squares and I'd like another 30-40 round bales. The clover's growing well- the grass, not so much. It's a good thing I like to feed clover hay! (No I've never experienced slobbers with clover hay, and they stay almost too fat on it with less/no grain.)

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