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Trees for wetland area in horse field

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  • Trees for wetland area in horse field

    I recently got a a "buffer in a bag" (well actually 2 they had extras). I wanted to plant some trees in the wetland area of a horse field and some by the stream where no horses are.

    The trees included in the buffer are:
    American Plum
    Swamp White Oak
    River Birch
    Silky Dogwood
    Red-Osier Dogwood

    Are there any which I shouldn't plant in the horse field for toxicity reasons?

    What would be the best and easiest way to protect them while they are growing?

    They recommended tree shelters, with the tubex.com being the brand they included info about.
    http://www.leakycreek.com/
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    John P. Smith II 1973-2009 Love Always
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  • #2
    those tree shelters look alright but for for my personal taste I'd still would like to have a cage around the trees to prevent the horses from pushing them over and impaling themselves on the shelter tube.

    Kind of like a three sided Y shape cage, wrapped with chicken wire, possibly barbed wire around the top. Those also keep teh trees protected when they are growing past those tubes. Horses do have quiet a reach.

    The plastic tubes would also keep other critters from eating the saplings.


    Birch sounds good to me.
    There was another thread about threes in pasture (wet conditions, incidentally) with a link to the Cornell page with the toxic plants.
    Originally posted by BigMama1
    Facts don't have versions. If they do, they are opinions
    GNU Terry Prachett

    Comment


    • #3
      Cypress would also work. Lots of them around here. River Birch are fantastic trees. I love mine and they grow fast.

      Comment


      • #4
        Here is a list of the species NOT to plant: http://www.equisearch.com/farm_ranch...nt/eqtoxic436/

        Oaks are on the list.

        The dogwoods are considered shrubs and won't get much over 15' tall.

        I second the idea of cypress and another idea is tulip poplar.
        Alison Howard
        Homestead Farms, Maryland www.freshorganicvegetables.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Thank you for that great link Benson.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Benson View Post
            Here is a list of the species NOT to plant: http://www.equisearch.com/farm_ranch...nt/eqtoxic436/

            Oaks are on the list.

            The dogwoods are considered shrubs and won't get much over 15' tall.

            I second the idea of cypress and another idea is tulip poplar.
            link from your link

            http://southcampus.colostate.edu/poi...ees-plants.mht

            a more extensive list of what to shy away from

            Cultivated Trees and Plants Potentially Poisonous to Animals

            The following commonly available trees, shrubs and plants are often sold through plant nurseries, and pose a potential hazard to animals if they are planted in or around animal enclosures. If these plants are found to be desirable for landscaping purposes, it is important to position the plants well away from where animals can reach them. Furthermore it is essential to always provide a balanced nutritious diet to animals at all times so that they are not driven through hunger to eating unusual plant material. It is also important to remember that the careless disposal of tree and plant prunnings into an animal enclosure is a frequent cause of poisoning.

            Trees
            Black walnutJuglans nigra
            Red Maple and its hybrids Acer rubrum
            Oak Quercus spp.
            Black locust Robinia pseudoacacia
            Golden chain tree Laburnum anagyroides
            Horse chestnut, buckeye Aesculus spp
            Chokecherry Prunus spp.
            Kentucky coffee tree Gymnocladus dioica
            Russian Olive Elaeagnus angustifolia
            Persimmon Diospyros virginiana
            Chinese tallow tree Sapium sebiferum (mildly toxic)

            Shrubs
            Yew Taxus spp.
            Oleander Nerium oleander
            Yellow oleander Thevetia spp.
            Privet Ligustrum spp.
            Hydrangea Hydrangea spp.
            Rhododendron (azalea) Rhododendron spp.
            Japanese Pieris Pieris japonica
            Laurel Kalmia spp.
            Black laurel Leucothoe davisiae
            Boxwood Buxus sempervirens
            Burning bush Euonymus atropurpurens
            Lantana Lantana camara
            Angels Trumpet Brugmansia spp.
            Mesquite Prosopis veluntina
            Day or night blooming Jasmine Cestrum diurnum, C. nocturnum

            Vines
            Carolina jessamine Gelsemium sempervirens
            Virginia creeper Parthenocissus quinquefolia

            Perennial Plants
            Fox glove Digitalis purpurea
            Larkspur Delphinium spp.
            Monkshood Aconitum spp.
            Lupines Lupinus spp.
            Hairy vetch Vicia villosa
            Crown vetch Coronilla spp.
            Castor bean Ricinus communis
            Last edited by SGray; Apr. 24, 2012, 04:39 PM. Reason: format
            Nothing says "I love you" like a tractor. (Clydejumper)

            The reports states, “Elizabeth reported that she accidently put down this pony, ........, at the show.”

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Daydream Believer View Post
              Cypress would also work. Lots of them around here. .
              Cypress are draught hardy also... we have then here in Texas and they are still alive after the worst draught in sixty years

              As for that list of trees posted above.... I believe nearly every one of those are pretty common in Kentucky pastures

              Comment


              • #8
                I have yet to see a horse facility without Oak trees in our area...

                Comment


                • #9
                  I think the problem with oaks is the acorns..... I know more than one horse who has colicked from eating acorns.

                  As far as dogwoods are concerned, they get to be big trees here in Ocala....

                  What about sweetgum? WHite cedar (nice wildlife tree), sycamore, redbud, sweetbay magnolia (nice small magnolia type flowers).. here's a list:

                  http://www.mortonarb.org/tree-plant-...wet-sites.html
                  NOTE this is not a list of safe trees, just wetland tolerant trees! But i think all the ones I listed above are safe - I know my horses eat the magnolias!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    No one has mentioned willows, which come in a big variety, LOVE being wet. Safe for horses to chew.

                    I have several willow planted in my wet area, along with a couple Oaks and a Cottonwood, which also loves being wet. The Oaks I grew from acorns, they are Burr Oaks, take wet and dry, still do fine.

                    I purchased the Willows, Curly (upright growth), Babylonian (big weeper), because they drink LOTS of water, so with time I hope to have a MUCH LESS wet place. I am also topping the willows off, to prevent great height. I want them spreading their roots widely, big thick trunks, but not much height. I think the correct term is "pollarding" them to a matching height. I have seen photos of this practice in the Netherlands, along their big drainage ditches, to help drink up excess water and hold the banks solidly when the water drains fast.

                    I have just purchased a London Plane tree, similar but larger than a Sycamore. It will be a sort of speciman tree, alone in his space, also drinking LOTS of water I hope. He goes in the swale hole, which has a semi-permanent ponding going on. Tag promises 80-100ft tall, with 100ft width! Hoping for some shade in time. I probably won't live to see that full growth, but it should be very pretty to look at, alone in the field.

                    Tulip poplars are among the faster growing of large trees, along with being Native so they manage in all sorts of settings.

                    I do haul water to these planted trees the first couple years, if we have dry stretches of time, with high heat, in summer. They get a few gallons every week out of a muck tub in the gator. Siphon hose is easier than carrying buckets! They survive with this bit of help, then go along fine as they get larger, have the deeper roots. I mow around small trees, 4ft or less, so the grass doesn't slurp up all the water first.

                    All my trees are protected from the horses with a fence, so they can't reach the trees. Winter need for forage by the horses, means they would kill the trees quickly without the fences.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Daydream Believer View Post
                      Cypress would also work. Lots of them around here. River Birch are fantastic trees. I love mine and they grow fast.
                      Do you have River Birch in your pasture? I love those trees, but the ones in my pasture haven't done all that well. My other trees have faired fine, but the river birch doesn't seem to like it. Could be something else entirely, I was just curious on your experience.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by goodhors View Post
                        No one has mentioned willows, which come in a big variety, LOVE being wet. Safe for horses to chew.

                        I have several willow planted in my wet area, along with a couple Oaks and a Cottonwood, which also loves being wet. The Oaks I grew from acorns, they are Burr Oaks, take wet and dry, still do fine.

                        I purchased the Willows, Curly (upright growth), Babylonian (big weeper), because they drink LOTS of water, so with time I hope to have a MUCH LESS wet place. I am also topping the willows off, to prevent great height. I want them spreading their roots widely, big thick trunks, but not much height. I think the correct term is "pollarding" them to a matching height. I have seen photos of this practice in the Netherlands, along their big drainage ditches, to help drink up excess water and hold the banks solidly when the water drains fast.

                        I have just purchased a London Plane tree, similar but larger than a Sycamore. It will be a sort of speciman tree, alone in his space, also drinking LOTS of water I hope. He goes in the swale hole, which has a semi-permanent ponding going on. Tag promises 80-100ft tall, with 100ft width! Hoping for some shade in time. I probably won't live to see that full growth, but it should be very pretty to look at, alone in the field.

                        Tulip poplars are among the faster growing of large trees, along with being Native so they manage in all sorts of settings.

                        I do haul water to these planted trees the first couple years, if we have dry stretches of time, with high heat, in summer. They get a few gallons every week out of a muck tub in the gator. Siphon hose is easier than carrying buckets! They survive with this bit of help, then go along fine as they get larger, have the deeper roots. I mow around small trees, 4ft or less, so the grass doesn't slurp up all the water first.

                        All my trees are protected from the horses with a fence, so they can't reach the trees. Winter need for forage by the horses, means they would kill the trees quickly without the fences.
                        I definitely agree with the fencing -- trees are a magnet for chewing! I love willows and plane trees are amazing. What about a Sycamore? They love wet locations are beautiful and also grow very large...

                        Comment

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