• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

Finding charolais cows for sale?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Finding charolais cows for sale?

    I am reaching for the power of coth here, we are switching cattle breeds from long horn to another breed. My husband wants charolais because they are the more gentle breed of cattle and we already have two bulls. But my goodness there seem to be none for sale, anywhere!!! I'd prefer to locate some in the south east but at this point since we want a truck load will look farther away. Any ideas? I have googled the Internet till my eyes are crossed. I really don't care for straight angus cause my cow horse is small and those are some large cattle, we had two bulls and I sold them because they were just too big!

  • #2
    I know of a guy near Bracey, Va. that raises them, but I don't think he ever has as many as a truckload for sale in any one year.

    Contact E.B. Harris. He can probably point you in the right direction. Tell him Tom King sent you.

    http://www.ebharris.com/

    I thought Charlais could be bigger than Angus. Have you looked at Polled Herefords. Those are some calm, small cows that produce great beef, and are easy keepers.
    www.HistoricHousePreservation.com

    Comment


    • #3
      There are a ton of sales listed here.

      http://www.charolaisusa.com/calendar.html

      Comment


      • #4
        the best we ever had came from here

        http://www.rogersbarhr.com/

        Tamara
        Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
        I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.

        Comment


        • #5
          Um, Charolais are way bigger than Angus. In fact, Angus are one of the smaller beef breeds. I wouldn't consider them all that friendly either. We used to have Brangus cows and crossed them to Charolais bulls. We kept a few of the Brangus x Charolais heifers. Those were some of the craziest cows we ever owned. And boy, could they jump! I think we had a couple who could have held their own on the Grand Prix circuit. The craziest, best jumping cow finally messed up her hip trying to jump out of a 7' fence and wound up as hamburger probably.
          I'm a second hand Vegan. Cows eat grass. I eat cows.

          Comment


          • #6
            I second Tom King's suggestion of polled Herefords if you're looking for smaller and gentler.
            ---------------------------

            Comment


            • #7
              There is a ranch on my way from my farm to work that has Charolais cattle for sale. I will have to see what information the sign has on it tomorrow.

              Oddly, when I was driving in this morning, I happened to look over at the herd of cows and saw 2 zebra mixed in with them..lol.
              Rhode Islands are red;
              North Hollands are blue.
              Sorry my thoroughbreds
              Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by wireweiners View Post
                Um, Charolais are way bigger than Angus. In fact, Angus are one of the smaller beef breeds. I wouldn't consider them all that friendly either. We used to have Brangus cows and crossed them to Charolais bulls. We kept a few of the Brangus x Charolais heifers. Those were some of the craziest cows we ever owned. And boy, could they jump! I think we had a couple who could have held their own on the Grand Prix circuit. The craziest, best jumping cow finally messed up her hip trying to jump out of a 7' fence and wound up as hamburger probably.
                I was just going to say the same thing. Where in dickens did you hear that Charolais cattle are small???? Gentle, yes - but small? No way!! They're huge!

                When we lived up by Winchester, VA, there were several Charolais owners around, & man are those big beasts. Pretty much the same size as the Devon cattle that several folks up there raised - & they're known as the "elephants of cattle" - lol! Angus are quite a bit smaller, as are the Belted Galloways that quite a few other folks raised up there.

                I don't have any links for you, but I saw more Charolais in Winchester, VA, than anywhere else. You may want to concentrate one search there via local cattle organizations. Although the few breeders I knew certainly didn't have anything close to "truck loads" for sale. They basically bred as homesteaders & for local beef sales.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Like Wireweiners said, Charolais are bigger than Angus... and way hotter too. I've had several Charolais over the years, and we breed about 300 heifers for someone... they are hot and fired up. I have yet to meet a calm one (doesn't mean they're not out there). Most (read, "most") Angus cattle are pretty gentle. We have 100 head here on our ranch and there are only about 2 momma cows I"d like to get rid of, but they raise good calves

                  Herefords are generally pretty nice too, but just like dogs/horses/etc, it depends how they were raised. If they're raised 'close-knit' with their breeders, then they're likely to be gentle no matter what breed they are.

                  Maybe look at Shorthorns too... they're a bit smaller and pretty docile.

                  As far as finding them to buy... if you're set on Charolais, just get on the breed website and look up the breeder listing... then find the nearest ranch to you
                  Kelli
                  Horse Drawings!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Second the shorthorns. I have worked with several Millking Shorthorns, and they are a smaller, very docile breed. If you would ever consider a more dual purpose breed, Ayrshires are an amazing breed. If I was going to have a beef herd in my little fantasy world, though, I would have linebacks, sometimes called darksided Wessex. They are a breed dating back to Colonial times and are very, very cool! There is a breeder in Berryville, VA. We are actually milking one, but they are more on the beef side of dual purpose. Smaller, gentle etc. I don't know how long to get them to slaughter weight though.

                    http://www.randalllineback.com/
                    Originally posted by The Saddle
                    Perhaps I need my flocking adjusted.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by kellidahorsegirl View Post
                      Like Wireweiners said, Charolais are bigger than Angus... and way hotter too. I've had several Charolais over the years, and we breed about 300 heifers for someone... they are hot and fired up. I have yet to meet a calm one (doesn't mean they're not out there).
                      Maybe look at Shorthorns too... they're a bit smaller and pretty docile.

                      As far as finding them to buy... if you're set on Charolais, just get on the breed website and look up the breeder listing... then find the nearest ranch to you
                      Yes - it's quite possible that all of the Charolais I had close-up-&-personal experiences with were mild-mannered because they were part of relatively small homesteader farms. Thus lots of personal hands-on attention, etc., etc.

                      Comment

                      • Original Poster

                        #12
                        Wow that is interesting to hear, we have two Charolais bulls now that we have been crossing with our longhorns. Previously we had two angus bulls and they were the biggest meanest things I've ever encountered! We had to flip to see who was gonna ride into the pens to push them out. I sold them after one breeding season and all the offspring were just as crazy so got rid of them also. Our bulls now are extremely gentle, one even likes to be scratched on the head. I guess the Charolais down here are smaller then up north cause our bulls are on the smaller size especially when compared to the angus which easily were pushing 2500lbs! We are not really stuck on a breed, we were just going with Charolais cause we already had two bulls.
                        Last edited by dressagedevon; Mar. 13, 2012, 02:31 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Well, it would be across the country but there is a large farm outside of Greeley Colorado where they breed them. The address might be LaPorte instead of Greeley. If you are interested send me a PM and I will try to find in online for you tonight. Don't have time right now.
                          Nina's Story
                          Epona Comm on FB

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            My best friend's son raises Charolais. He has several contacts for other breeders too. We are located about 40 miles south of Macon, GA. PM me if you are interested in getting his contact info.
                            "My biggest fear is that when I die my husband is going to try to sell all my horses and tack for what I told him they cost."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Charolais for angus and Simmental later for hererfords were some of the first "exotics" that were imported to cross with what was here already, mostly angus in the northern states, herefords in the western ones, both "english" breeds.

                              Some of the first charolais were very big, a bit harder to handle than english breeds and the first lines brought in a cattle hemophilia gene.
                              When you made steers of the bulls, you would find some that were hard to keep from bleeding and even died.

                              Then they started importing chianinas from Italy and a better cross with angus.
                              A friend had some of the first "chi" bulls and sold 4H calves off them.
                              Eventually, the best first cross with Angus was determined to be limousin.

                              Since charolais was one of the first ones of those imported "exotic" continental breeds, there seem to be the most of them.
                              When crossed with angus, many calves are all hues of tannish gray colors.
                              There is, or was a charolais breeder for many decades now in Eastern NM, Gray Charolais, that was said to have some very nice ones.
                              Since this was mostly hereford country, his customers tended to be more from East of here.

                              Today you can practically get any AI type gene mixture, that will give you exactly the percentages of breeds you like to use for your area.

                              English breeds are generally quick to get fat and adding some exotic to the calves produced a better calf, some of those breeds more than others.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Bear in mind too..outside of what others have mentioned..Ive found the Char's dont "sell" as well in the south as in the north..same unfortunantly with Simmental's (one of my most favorite breeds.. )..seems certain "types" of cattle sell better in certain areas then others..

                                Granted, the cow market is soaring now..and I dont know what your ultimate goal for your cattle is..

                                Herefords are a pretty good docile breed..IMO, the most docile breed out there (outside of Sim's..but Sim's are HUMUNGOUS!)..

                                You may visit "Cattle Today" and speak with some folks from your area for contacts for any cattle.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Charolais bulls on Brangus cows are still a popular cross around here. You need a bit of Brahma to handle the heat and humidity plus they seem to have better milk production and mothering ability than straight Angus. The Angus helps to finish faster and adds marbling to the beef while the Charolais adds size and muscling.

                                  When I was in ag school, years ago, we were taught that the best 3 way cross was Brahma x English (usually Angus or Hereford) female crossed to an exotic bull with Charolais, Simmental and Limousin being the most popular. Chianinas didn't last too long as an exotic cross because they were so big and so heavily muscled, they often caused calving problems.

                                  We had some American White Park cows a while back. They were awesome mother cows and produced some awesome calves crossed to Charolais bulls. They were very gentle and easy to work with too. When we bought the cows they were bred to Brahma bulls. We kept the White Park/Brahma cross heifers and they were really the best mama cows I've ever been around. Pretty to look at, great producers and very gentle.
                                  I'm a second hand Vegan. Cows eat grass. I eat cows.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    had to laugh as the last pen of long tailed baby doll angus we had thru the pens were nutty as hell...one even tried to BITE the guy ear tagging him....who knew cows could bite ??

                                    the Charolais should be about 1600 pounds and have enough "mama" in them to object loudly when someone comes around their babies....the range raised ones will charge wolves or bears and humans are fair game as well in calving season....

                                    Range bred mama's made up most of the herd that was here when we were married....almost 150 strong...this farm was known for it's bull crop every year and now and then,when we are traveling,some old man in a cafe will remember us and talk (randomly) about "the best white bull he ever bought"(good stuff that)

                                    Tamara
                                    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
                                    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      ^^Ah, the Super Baldy's..(BrimmerxHereford)..yep, I imagine that would be a darn nice crossed back on a Simmi..or even Char..and I am not a char fan..

                                      you are right in alittle "ear" helps the cattle weather the heat better..why I mentioned Char's not being popular, at least in my area..and the simmi's too..they dont "do" well in the heat..during our summers, my brangus girls are out grazing while the char's up the road sit panting under the mesquites or wallow in the stockpond..

                                      But, if you are catering to a market outside of "general sales"..really doesnt matter what cattle you raise..to an extent of course..laypeople have an obsession with black cattle..they've been programed to beleive that black =better..

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by spinandslide View Post
                                        But, if you are catering to a market outside of "general sales"..really doesnt matter what cattle you raise..to an extent of course..laypeople have an obsession with black cattle..they've been programed to beleive that black =better..
                                        yes the black hide sells better every time...the Charolais do so much better in the ice and snow...wet cold and ice and the babies would plop out ready to get a drink and play

                                        damndest thing I ever did see

                                        Tamara
                                        Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
                                        I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.

                                        Comment

                                        Working...
                                        X