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Picking up after a horse when riding down the (city) road

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  • Picking up after a horse when riding down the (city) road

    Here's a question for the city horse folk (maybe you SoCal riders?).

    Since I am waiting until fall to get an arena set up on my property, I've been riding around my neighborhood (formerly horse property but now mostly 1-2AC lots with empty old barns). There are horse-and-rider yield signs all over and a few mini "trails", but I haven't seen another rider yet. Every time my horse poops we are in a close radius to home so I grab a muck bucket and retrieve the "future compost" he left on our ride.

    I'd really like to try riding further from home, maybe even to the public arena a mile away, but am not sure about the manure pickup issue. The carriage-type poop bags seem too complicated to attach, and if I could scoop it up at the moment of conception I'm not sure how to carry it

    Anyone have this problem?

  • #2
    Ok, lots of Amish around here and while most use carriage bags there are still plenty of road apples to go around. And no one ever bothers to come back and clean those up.
    It's a lot like nuts and bolts - if the rider's nuts, the horse bolts! ~Nicholas Evans

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    • #3
      oh my, our horses would die if they were to poop in public...they were shown in national class a shows and it was a no, no to poop in the ring... so when out on the street the same though is carried through

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by clanter View Post
        oh my, our horses would die if they were to poop in public...they were shown in national class a shows and it was a no, no to poop in the ring... so when out on the street the same though is carried through
        I don't even want to know how you teach a horse not to poop when it needs to. I sure like being able to go when nature calls.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Cruiser12 View Post
          I don't even want to know how you teach a horse not to poop when it needs to. I sure like being able to go when nature calls.
          Please tell me you don't just go when it comes to you. We have designated areas for that.
          "Rock n' roll's not through, yeah, I'm sewing wings on this thing." --Destroyer
          http://dressagescriblog.wordpress.com/

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          • #6
            On open public roads, the horses just poop. You should see all the horse-apples on the roads through Lancaster County (Amish country)!

            If there are local laws against it, have you looked at poo catchers? Eg. http://www.bunbag.com/

            I can't imagine having to carry tools with me and hop off the horse every time he drops some nuggets. That seems awfully cumbersome.
            Veterinarians for Equine Welfare

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            • Original Poster

              #7
              Ah the Bun Bag... that has been in the back of my mind actually. It must be just so intense to strap into that thing!

              I don't know the laws regarding road apples and will have to look them up. I guess I'm mostly concerned about being a good neighbor, being that I'm new and have bucked the trend of buying a horse property and turning it into a pool and gazebo.

              My other last resort plan involves a dustpan, a plastic bag, and a small backpack.

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              • #8
                We never worried about it. It dries out and blows away in no time.
                If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket

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                • #9
                  When I did live in an area that cared about it, I would just kick it off the road onto the grass. A few good swipes with my boot and it was hard to notice. This was easier when driving because I did carry along a large dustpan to do the scooping, since I was often not wearing appropriate footwear for kicking poop when driving. I never actually carried it back with me. In that particular neighborhood, people walked dogs all the time and never picked up after them so I felt reasonably assured that we were on the same level. I'm glad we moved though.

                  Is there a homeowner's association that has rules against it? Has anyone said anything to you? If the roads are car-accessible, could you drive out later with a muck bucket/fork to clean up, instead of trying to worry about it right at the moment?

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                  • #10
                    I don't have ANY ideas, just three stories: co-worker moved out into Lancaster county, into the middle of Amish country to enjoy the countryside, and then he started bitterly complaining about the horse poop on the roads.

                    People who moved into some new houses that had been built next to a park, a park with lots of decades-old, heavily used bridle trails, started booby-trapping the trail running closest to their houses (string at head height, etc.), piling logs and debris up trying to block the trail, and started complaining to the park rangers about the odor of horse poop on the trail disturbing them.

                    Place I boarded briefly we would get into the park by riding down an "easement" that also happened to be the driveway to get to three different houses. Someone new bought one of the three houses, and started to throw really scary fits if he found any horse poop on the easement. After he'd gunned his car and aimed at horses on the easement several times, and also whipped the car around blocking the easement in front of horses, and after viewing his in general psychotic behavior I chose to move my horse.

                    All these cases the persons chose to live where they knew there would be horses, and in all cases they acted like fruitcakes when they discovered that yes, horses poop.

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                    • #11
                      Holy cow... Those are some crappy neighbors!

                      Sorry, couldn't help myself. The pun was too irresistible to pass up. But in all reality that is crossing the line into endangering and attempting bodily harm. In my opinion, Just because they didn't personally physically assault a person doesn't make them less responsible if someone got hurt as a result of their actions. Not sure if the law views it the same way.
                      It's a lot like nuts and bolts - if the rider's nuts, the horse bolts! ~Nicholas Evans

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I think you're a great neighbor to be concerned.

                        Do you know any of your neighbors? Are any of them gardeners? You could always mention the free fertilizer...

                        Perhaps every so often you could take a garbage bag and walk your route, then offer the gatherings to the gardeners. Word will spread (more than the manure) that you clean up after your horse.

                        I think most people will be less bothered by it than you are and will appreciate your efforts. A few road apples are much better than the pop bottles and litter many leave behind!
                        They're not miniatures, they're concentrates.

                        Born tongue-in-cheek and foot-in-mouth

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                        • #13
                          If you're in the dusty desert it won't last long. Around here people ride through town all the time (it's a small town, granted, but not that rural--we have a good-sized college) and at most just hop off and scatter it a bit/kick it out of walking paths then ride on. It dries up and blows away very quickly, even more so if you do break it up a bit.
                          exploring the relationship between horse and human

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                          • Original Poster

                            #14
                            Wendy - I guess it's because we're horse people (and forget that those "other types" exist) but those stories really get my goat! Its so weird to ride down a street of horse properties-turned-tennis courts, it's always on the back of my mind that we are one poop away from being somebody's new nemesis.

                            Susanne - Thank you! I have only met a handful of neighbors so far - maybe because it's 110 degrees and no one is outside - and I am really invested in making a good impression. Tonight I went back to pick up some road apples and got to do a little public relations when meeting another, a little "Oh yes I ALWAYS come back to pick them up, tell everyone"

                            CosMonster - Great idea, I'm going to try boot dispersal on the next viable poop. Wish I could time it to always happen in front of a bush.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by philosoraptor View Post
                              On open public roads, the horses just poop. You should see all the horse-apples on the roads through Lancaster County (Amish country)!

                              If there are local laws against it, have you looked at poo catchers? Eg. http://www.bunbag.com/

                              I can't imagine having to carry tools with me and hop off the horse every time he drops some nuggets. That seems awfully cumbersome.
                              I've been stuck behind a few poopers in Charles County Amish and who really cares about the horse-apples? I don't

                              I suppose the "non-horsies" do but really... that should be the least of concerns in everyone's day. Oh well, I guess it is a world ending event for some
                              Draumr Hesta Farm
                              "Wenn Du denkst es geht nicht mehr, kommt von irgendwo ein kleines Licht daher"
                              Member of the COTH Ignorant Disrepectful F-bombs!*- 2Dogs Farm

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                              • #16
                                re:horse poop

                                Here in the land of the horse haters:
                                1. load horse in trailer for 2 minutes before leaving for a ride. Horses will usually poop immediately in the trailer and poop less on the ride.

                                2. rubber dust pan attached to saddle with a double end snap, hanging down on side of horse.

                                3. canvas bag with leftover vegetable plastic bags hanging with a double end snap.

                                Most of the time the trailer works and we don't have to pick up the poop. Technically, we are not required to pick up the poop but it's been part of a very heated discussion in the town hall meeting that involved horses being allowed on some of the open space. The few of us who are left with horses figure it's smarter to just keep everyone happy.

                                I too, have had cars driven at me, booby traps etc. One thing to be aware of for booby traps of string tied at height, because of a death in wilton, ct, there is now precedence for prosecution against anyone boobytrapping. Mentioning that court case has helped in decreasing the booby traps. I guess anti-horse people who have spent several million on their house feel they own the world and streets.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  One of my b/o's neighbors called the police once because a horse pooped in the middle of the road in front of her house. She was informed that there were no laws concerning picking up after the horse and it is a public road and we're under no obligation to pick it up. If she had any brains she would have picked the stuff up and added it to the compost pile. My dad always said composted horse manure is the best thing for the rubarb.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    .
                                    ...and irises love it straight out of the horse, no composting necessary. Same with roses, though not directly against tender roots.
                                    They're not miniatures, they're concentrates.

                                    Born tongue-in-cheek and foot-in-mouth

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by KarrotKreek View Post
                                      But in all reality that is crossing the line into endangering and attempting bodily harm. In my opinion, Just because they didn't personally physically assault a person doesn't make them less responsible if someone got hurt as a result of their actions. Not sure if the law views it the same way.
                                      The way it works in my state is thus:

                                      If someone is creating a disturbance aimed at you on horseback to the level that YOU, as a reasonable person, believe that severe injury or death will be a direct result, and you are not responsible for starting the confrontation, and you can't safely remove yourself from the confrontation; the legal door to the use of deadly force in self defense has been opened.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by LetsGoSteady View Post
                                        Wendy - I guess it's because we're horse people (and forget that those "other types" exist) but those stories really get my goat! Its so weird to ride down a street of horse properties-turned-tennis courts, it's always on the back of my mind that we are one poop away from being somebody's new nemesis.
                                        I used to board at a backyard situation and we had to ride in the neighborhood to get to parks or state land trails.

                                        Let me tell you, horses in suburbia are novel and quaint and everyone loves them *until* they see one poop pile left or they smell *anything* or they have one extra fly fly onto their property.

                                        Non horsey people go bonkers over horse poop. To them it might as well be one great big massive steaming dog pile. They find it revolting and insulting that its in their streets, in front of their lawns, or that they have to side step it on a park trail.

                                        I spend a ton of time in amish areas all over PA. I patronize local businesses, etc., and even some of them bitch about the horse crap in the streets, and horses are a daily sight to folks living out here.

                                        LOL, funny story, I was staying at a friend's house in amish country PA and I was driving the wife someplace. Coming around the corner there was a manure pile in the street and she shrieked, "don't hit it! You don't want that all over your tires!". I was like 'lady, I'll betcha $5 I got some on my bootheel right now "

                                        I have brought non horse family and friends to meet my horse at a barn only to have them literally start retching at the sight of a manure pile.

                                        I don't get it either. Human poop is about the only thing that really grosses me out.

                                        Luckily my horses have always been far too coy to poop publicly if they can at all help it, they hold it until they are in the woods, and even then they don't like pooping in the trail. BUT we did used to travel with a small folding fork (I always trail rode with a cantle bag even english), and if a horse crapped, we'd scrap it off to the closest piece of woods and kick leaves on it.

                                        It was an effort to show our neighbors we cared, and it worked because we had good neighbors that would allow us to trespass lightly when needed for safety, etc. And nobody went around raising holy hell about the riding stable that was hiding behind someones home. And they easily could have made our lives miserable in so many ways.

                                        We have even gone so far if a horse crapped on the street and there was no place to dispose of it in the immediate area, after we returned home we would drive out with a muck bucket, fork and bucket of water and clean the site.

                                        You might laugh at the effort we made, but it paid us back in the long run.
                                        Being terrible at something is the first step to being truly great at it. Struggle is the evidence of progress.

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