• Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You’re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it—details of personal disputes are likely better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts that violate these rules. Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting, but administrators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts upon request.

Outright inflammatory, vulgar, harassing, malicious or otherwise inappropriate statements and criminal charges unsubstantiated by a reputable news source or legal documentation will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it’s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users’ profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses – Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it’s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who’s selling it, it doesn’t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions – Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services – Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products – While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements – Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be “bumped” excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues – Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators’ discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the “alert” button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your “Ignore” list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you’d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user’s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 1/26/16)
See more
See less

How much storage space for hay?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How much storage space for hay?

    I'm in the process of trying to build a barn on a small piece of property. I'm going to be keeping two horses on the property. I'm trying to figure out the minimum amount of space I could get away with for hay storage assuming I would have it delivered once a month. I'm new to this, so any insight is appreciated. How much hay would you order a month for two horses, and how much room would I need to store that amount of hay.

  • #2
    what size are your bales? traditional 41 inch or compressed 21 inch?
    as storage needs are determined by dimensions of the items to be stored.

    Tamara
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      I don't buy my own hay right now, I do full boarding, but most bales in my area are the larger ones, so I would plan for those.

      Comment


      • #4
        One or two bales per day

        I am guessing you would use one or two bales per day if it's decent quality hay. Of the normal (not compressed) type. My hay storage area is about 12 feet by 20 feet and about 4 feet open space along 2 sides for access. Other two sides are against corner of the barn. I get 50 bales per delivery, and it gets stacked 4 or 5 bales high. If you can arrange for more ground space, you wouldn't have to stack it as high. If you have to do it yourself, you will be happy about that. You'll never regret giving yourself extra space, IMO, if you can.

        Comment


        • #5
          at 20 lbs a day you would feed 1200lb/mo
          if the bales weigh 50 lb you need room for 24 bales
          the dimension is 41x14x18 and if you can stack them
          9 feet tall, your floor dimension is 4x4foot
          or 4 foot deep 4 foot tall and 9 foot long

          but being an unregulated industry,there are countless
          variables involved to package size and weight and
          quality.

          Tamara
          Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
          I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Houdini1220 View Post
            I'm in the process of trying to build a barn on a small piece of property. I'm going to be keeping two horses on the property. I'm trying to figure out the minimum amount of space I could get away with for hay storage assuming I would have it delivered once a month. I'm new to this, so any insight is appreciated. How much hay would you order a month for two horses, and how much room would I need to store that amount of hay.
            Before you start planning for a month's worth, I would make sure that you have a local farmer that is willing to do that for you. In my area, very few farmers will store hay for clients, unless it is a contract for a large boarding barn. The few that do allow hay storage require it to be paid up front, and you come and pick it up, they don't deliver it. The only way you can get hay around here in say, January, is if it's already sitting in your own barn or if you go down to the farm supply store where you will be paying upwards of $8.00 a bale for not-so-great stuff. (Which is an outrage considering it's $3.50 a bale for great stuff around here....they just know they've got you by the short and curlies in the middle of the winter.)

            As for how much hay you'd order, figure out what your horses are eating now on a daily basis, and extrapolate that out. It's going to vary dramatically based on your horse keeping practices/your horses/etc.

            Merely as an example...I have three relatively easy-keeping horses who split two bales (roughly 50lbs each) every day. One for AM feeding and one for PM feeding. They may get a third bale in the middle of the day if it's particularly cold, or a little bit more at night check. I have enough pasture so that they don't need hay in the summer months. But I figure about 60 bales a month for Nov-April (360 bales) plus I toss another 75-100 bales on top of that figure in case I start feeding out earlier/are feeding out later in the spring than planned (like this spring, when it just refused to warm up and they didn't go out on pasture until about a week ago), or in case bales get ruined somehow. Always plan on a hay buffer....best case scenario you end up with some extra and can sell it to a friend.

            Properly stacked, I can fit 150 bales in a roughly 15x15 loft bay, about 7' high.

            Comment


            • #7
              OP: when you say "large" do you mean the 4x4' squares? Or round bales?

              FWIW:
              I store 250 55# small square bales - ~6.5 tons - in a space the size of 2 12X12 stalls: so about 3000cf (stacked to the rafters @ 10').
              For me, this is a year's supply for 2 horses w/access to some pasture for add'l forage.
              This year I will cut back by 50 bales since I'm feeding one horse & 1 pony.

              IF you can possibly set aside this kind of space, I know it makes me feel a lot more confident to have the year's supply in. One less thing to stress about in bad weather.

              Even if your hayguy is willing to hold some or all of your hay purchase & deliver later, he still needs to be able to get his truck/wagon onto your property & in the vicinity of your barn or hay storage bldg.

              Take anything Tamara in TN says to heart - hay is her business
              *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
              Steppin' Out 1988-2004
              Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
              Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015

              Comment


              • #8
                I have a hay barn, but also have a small hay area in my horse barn approximately 6'x8'(the back side is my feed room, also about 6x8). It'll easily hold 30 50-55# bales; we've had close to 50 in there when emptying part of a hay wagon.

                I have 4 in the barn right now, and I feed about 2 bales a day so about 60 bales/month.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I keep two QH at home here in the PNW. I figure on 20 # each per day during the winter and 10# each during the summer (we've got some pasture). I can get 6 of the 6.5 tons I need into my loft, which is approx 10'x25' stacked 5 high. I stacked the rest on pallets on the floor and use them first. FWIW, my bales are bigger than yours as they're 90-110# depending on who I buy from.

                  It doesn't snow around here, but even so it's a PITA to get hay delivered (or picked up) when it rains for 8 months of the year.

                  This year I'm going into summer with 4.5 tons of 2010 hay to feed (found some 2 weeks ago that was gorgeous and reasonably priced) so likely will be dealing with the nightmare of getting hay in Jan or Feb to not end up with the 2011 hay in front of the 2010. I'm not looking forward to figuring out how to have 2 tons delivered during the rainy months.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I built a 10x10 lean to a few summers ago and I can put 40-50 bales in there, and still have enough room to fill haybags, etc. My 2 geldings eat a bale a day, so it's perfect. I left the entire front open, and just have a tarp hanging to protect the hay from the weather. Everyone keeps bothering me to put on a door, but the tarp is so simple to work around, and when it comes time to fill the shed I just take the tarp down and we can toss/stack the hay very easily. I put 4 wooden pallets on the ground inside the shed to keep the hay elavated. I have a 5" diameter pvc pipe that I drilled a few holes thru & I run cable ties thru the holes and attach it to the bottom of the tarp. It keeps it from blowing around and I can just turn the pipe up on it's end and it drapes the tarp out of the way while I'm working in the shed. So simple & easy - I love it!

                    My hay is 40lbs small square bales of timothy.
                    Cindy

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I don't have excess hay storage either. My insurance didn't allow for a loft to be built for hay storage in my barn and our town requires a solid foundation for any building over 10x10. Needless to say spending a few grand on a solid foundation ups the cost of a hay barn...we didn't build one.

                      I have 2 horses at home too. I go through approximately a bale a day for two horses...I do not have enough grazing to qualify as their daily roughage intake. I have a small grass paddock that they can go out on 2-4 hours per day for 6 months of the year. So it's more of a salad bar than main course.

                      I say roughly a bale per day because it's not often around here that all bales will weigh 50 lbs. In one load I can have some 40 lb, some 45 lb, some 50 lb and even some 60 lb. So I feed by weight and feed each horse 25# per day. Some days I have a flakes left over from a bale and some days I have to open a 2nd bale.

                      I buy my hay every 3 weeks, the hay guy is 5 minutes from my house and prefers me to pick up as I need it. I coould go once a month, but hay guy is spoiled and likes more often visits as I bring him home made treats, LOL! I buy 25 bales every 21 days. I store them in a 10x12 empty stall, a single row 4 bales high. Leaves 3/4 of the stall for other stuff without being cramped.

                      You can stuff a buttload of hay in a single 10x12 or 12x12 stall. Easily 100 bales without it being way over your head. If you pack to the rafters, a lot more than that I'd bet. I don't pay for delivery, I have a pick up and unloading and stacking 25 bales takes me, by myself, about 15 minutes to unload and stack. Not worth paying for delivery.
                      You jump in the saddle,
                      Hold onto the bridle!
                      Jump in the line!
                      ...Belefonte

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hey Tamara...those compressed bales...do expand a lot when you pop them open or do they keep their shape and the flakes are just really dense tight? I always wondered about that...if when you open a new compressed bale it "pops" or does it retain it's compressed state.

                        I'm thinking that would be an enormous benefit in storing hay. 21" vs regular size is about half the size...meaning you can store twice the weight in hay in the same space.
                        You jump in the saddle,
                        Hold onto the bridle!
                        Jump in the line!
                        ...Belefonte

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MistyBlue View Post
                          Hey Tamara...those compressed bales...do expand a lot when you pop them open or do they keep their shape and the flakes are just really dense tight? I always wondered about that...if when you open a new compressed bale it "pops" or does it retain it's compressed state.

                          I'm thinking that would be an enormous benefit in storing hay. 21" vs regular size is about half the size...meaning you can store twice the weight in hay in the same space.
                          I got some of Tamara's a/o hay last year. Great stuff. My Horses thought it was cocaine. Doesn't pop much when opened. Downside is the weight. It's like handling a 65 pound chunk of concrete.
                          Equus makus brokus but happy

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If you are building and have the flexibility, I would build enough space to store a year's supply of hay. There is nothing like knowing you have enough to get your horses through to the next year -- and locking in good summer prices. Prices often go up substantially in the winter if the crop was bad, once people start feeling the shortage.

                            For two horses, I would give myself at least 12 by 36 for a year's supply. I can fit over 100 average small bales per stall, stacked to the ceiling (12'). I would do 12 by 48 if you can, then you have room to park some farm machinery there if you aren't using the space, good to keep stuff dry anyway.

                            If I was just doing a month, I would build an extra stall and keep the hay in one of the stalls. Then you can rotate stalls and, in an emergency, pull out the hay and house a third horse. A third stall makes the barn more valuable for resale as well.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by MistyBlue View Post
                              Hey Tamara...those compressed bales...do expand a lot when you pop them open or do they keep their shape and the flakes are just really dense tight? I always wondered about that...if when you open a new compressed bale it "pops" or does it retain it's compressed state.

                              I'm thinking that would be an enormous benefit in storing hay. 21" vs regular size is about half the size...meaning you can store twice the weight in hay in the same space.
                              the compression on the medium sized press that we have can never be more than 30% over the field compression....the larger presses can go to 50-75%(??) I think and hence the term "double compressed" as Larsen sends to FL or what is exported to the Pacific Rim...

                              so for a press like ours you can have that "pop" in grass hay but not so much in alfalfas which will hold the compression being more leaf and less stalk..

                              we can make 50-60lbs in that 21" bale...the storage savings is tremendous...

                              Tamara
                              Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
                              I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I got some of Tamara's a/o hay last year. Great stuff. My Horses thought it was cocaine. Doesn't pop much when opened. Downside is the weight. It's like handling a 65 pound chunk of concrete.
                                I wish I lived close enough to get hay from Tamara. But CT is just a *titch* outside of their regular delivery zone.
                                And then there's the occasional epic machinery malfunction with some of their trucks.

                                30% compression is still a whole lotta saved storage space. 75% is HUGE...I'd imagine it's like slinging cubes of lead around though. But for storing and/or shipping compression has to be a huge space/money saver!

                                I'm guessing wire baled? We see some of the 3 wire bales here. Not sure how much those are compressed but they're definitely a lot more dense and heavy than the average 2 string bales.
                                You jump in the saddle,
                                Hold onto the bridle!
                                Jump in the line!
                                ...Belefonte

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by MistyBlue View Post

                                  I'm guessing wire baled? We see some of the 3 wire bales here. Not sure how much those are compressed but they're definitely a lot more dense and heavy than the average 2 string bales.
                                  no poly strapping...three per 21"
                                  http://www.productionacres.com/hay_sales_info_page.htm
                                  4th pic down from top

                                  Tamara
                                  Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
                                  I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.

                                  Comment

                                  Working...
                                  X