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what to do about the barbed wire

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  • what to do about the barbed wire

    So we are looking at property and MO seems like acres upon acres upon acres of barbed wire.

    One of the places we like has approx 100 acres of BRAND new fenced and cross fenced barbed wire. Nice in the sense that we have metal posts, crappy in that who wants to take down all that fence and replace.

    Those of you that purchased old cow property, what did you do? I was wondering if we offered the barbed wire free to anyone who came and took it down? Then I have visions of someone injuring themself, and the potential liability.

    Thoughts?
    Celtic Pride Farm
    www.celticpridefarm.com
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  • #2
    Originally posted by okggo View Post
    So we are looking at property and MO seems like acres upon acres upon acres of barbed wire.

    One of the places we like has approx 100 acres of BRAND new fenced and cross fenced barbed wire. Nice in the sense that we have metal posts, crappy in that who wants to take down all that fence and replace.

    Those of you that purchased old cow property, what did you do? I was wondering if we offered the barbed wire free to anyone who came and took it down? Then I have visions of someone injuring themself, and the potential liability.

    Thoughts?
    We have miles of five wire barbed wire fences here, for cattle and horses and rarely have had an injury.
    Then, we manage for it, don't just have little pens fenced with it, add hot wire over the top in the small traps and protect the corners with panels.

    Barbwire really is not that aggressive as to jump at someone and attack out of the blue, when you are not looking.

    100' of barwire?
    You can just buy 10 10' panels and wire them to that fence to protect your horses at less cost than removing that little stretch, or remove it, should not take you an hour and then put whatever you like there.

    Comment


    • #3
      IMO, big pastures with barbed are a non-issue.

      My 2 mares are on 20ac fenced/cross-fenced in barbed with no problems.

      The only time I have had a problem with barbed was when my silly younger mare had to back up to the gelding pasture to tease the boys and cut her hind leg.

      Other than that, no problems.
      No one can make you feel inferior without your consent. - Eleanor Roosevelt
      For you to insult me, I must first value your opinion - Unknown
      Pleasure Portrait 1989-2016...sleep well my girl

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      • #4
        We added hot wire in front of the barbed wire rather than take it all down. Someday we might redo the fence but for now adding the hotwire was cheapest and easiest. We have a small pasture so the barbed wire is a concern. Like others, I don't think it would be much of an issue in a large pasture with plenty of grass.

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          "Barbwire really is not that aggressive as to jump at someone and attack out of the blue, when you are not looking."

          As someone who has cut myself on the stuff before...you do have to be really careful handling it if you don't have the right tools. It rips skin fairly easily.

          "You can just buy 10 10' panels and wire them to that fence to protect your horses at less cost than removing that little stretch, or remove it, should not take you an hour and then put whatever you like there." - This is 100 acres of barbed wire, not 100 feet.

          I wondered that too - with so much land is it as big a risk.
          Celtic Pride Farm
          www.celticpridefarm.com
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          • #6
            Barb wire is just miserable to work with. Heavy leather gloves are a must. On our farm, also pretty large, we capped all the steel posts and ran a strip of Horse Guard Electric Tape on top of any barb wire. It has worked fine. Only our perimeter fence still has some barb, we did take down any barb cross fences. Just too much risk, IMO. You might be able to give it away.

            I know many people with huge pastures fenced in barb that have never had an injury. But I also know of more than one horse crippled by it. Of course people with thousands of acres to fence really have no choice.
            Patty
            www.rivervalefarm.com
            Follow us on facebook - https://www.facebook.com/pages/River...ref=ts&fref=ts

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            • #7
              40 acres fenced and cross fenced with it....keeps the mustangs and the range cattle out (real problems here). Put hot wire/tape on 8 inch extended insulators on the inside is one good way to deal with it. My horses are all extremely well fence-trained and don't go near the fences. It is hard to control as it is taken down but I have done some older fences and then used the wire to make western themed Christmas wreathes for ranch gates (sell for nice prices but I always end up looking like I was in a fight with a whole pride of lions even with good leather work gloves!)
              Colored Cowhorse Ranch
              www.coloredcowhorseranch.com
              Northern NV

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Bluey View Post

                Barbwire really is not that aggressive as to jump at someone and attack out of the blue, when you are not looking.
                But it does if you are working with it, darn sttuff.

                I'm shocked to read so many people who are not horrified by the existence of barbed wire, I'm usually the lone voice being shouted at and down.

                We have 1500 acres, and the horses have to share the grazing land with the cows, all the big fields are 4 or 5 strand barb wire, the smaller paddocks that still have barb have a hot wire inside them, the smallest of them are hot wired.

                I have no alternative, the big fields will always be wired just out of practicality, but we are gradually working on getting some safe small turnout areas set up around the yard.
                I'm not sure if I grew out of stupid or ran out of brave.

                Practicing Member of the Not too Klassy for Boxed Wine Clique

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                • #9
                  I would never tell others to use barbwire, sure they would have an accident with it.

                  BUT, I have seen more accidents with all other kinds of fences than I have ever with barbwire.
                  Those I saw with barbwire were at the vet, being treated and I don't know why they got hurt, if the fences were badly managed, not that they were barbed wire.
                  One big no-no with barbed wire is to have horses across of each other, because if one paws at the other, it may get into the fence.
                  It seems that horses just don't seem to have the kind of common sense to know that.
                  Several neighbors at times use pastures next to ours and they always call first, to be sure we don't have any horses across the fence there.

                  I was just reminded that maybe at times barbwire does grab for you.
                  I was crawling thru the fence after opening the gate to let the horses out a few days ago and my lower pant leg hung up, cutting my pants and my leg right over the ankle and below the knee, cutting my leather glove and also my hand.
                  The lower leg cut probably could have used stitches, but it is healing fine with bandaids.
                  I am on nine years of ten with my last tetanus shot, so I assume good to go there too.

                  So, yes, there are times barbwire will attack, but I was asking for it right then.

                  Our old vet used to say that horses were hurt less with barbed wire because they respect it and it hurts, when other wire, barbless, cable, hot wire, baling wire, can cut them and they won't notice it right off, before it does much damage.

                  ANY wire or fences, really are places where a horse can get hurt if it tangles with it, or hits it hard enough.

                  Wire of any kind should be the last of our choices for smaller areas, but for larger ones, if you can't spent what it takes for other so much more expensive kinds of fencing, maybe barb wire is a sensible option, if managed properly.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    One Vet says one thing....our Vet says she's seen more accidents with horses and barbed wire than she ever wanted to see. If I ever had barbed wire on my property, it'd be replaced. A "lovely" experience with a horse getting spooked by another and running through a "small section of barbed wire, covered up by trees and growth" and a $$$$ Vet bill has me anti-barbed wire.

                    I've heard people say, "well my horse is smart enough to know better" or "my horse respects fences," but even the most respectful horse that is spooked beyond belief has accidents.
                    If wishes were horses then beggars would ride...
                    DLA: Draft Lovers Anonymous
                    Originally posted by talkofthetown
                    As in, the majikal butterfly-fahting gypsy vanners.

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                    • #11
                      I can't imagine taking it down - especially that much. I'm sure the wire with the barbs on it is just stiff enough to whip around and slash my face if I were to ever try.

                      Is there any way, with the metal posts, to run a rail across the top of the wire - either wood or some kind of tubular thing for better visibility? and the also run a wire offset of 6-8 inches with a hot wire inside?
                      Tranquility Farm - Proud breeder of Born in the USA Sport Horses, and Cob-sized Warmbloods
                      Now apparently completely invisible!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by HydroPHILE View Post
                        One Vet says one thing....our Vet says she's seen more accidents with horses and barbed wire than she ever wanted to see. If I ever had barbed wire on my property, it'd be replaced. A "lovely" experience with a horse getting spooked by another and running through a "small section of barbed wire, covered up by trees and growth" and a $$$$ Vet bill has me anti-barbed wire.

                        I've heard people say, "well my horse is smart enough to know better" or "my horse respects fences," but even the most respectful horse that is spooked beyond belief has accidents.
                        I think that comes down to management.
                        Any badly built and kept fence can cause injuries or loose horses.

                        If your fences in GA are like the ones we had in AL many years ago, I can see why horses get hurt on them, they were very sorry, a few strands of all kinds of material here and there, loose wire, some smooth, some barbed, an accident waiting to happen.
                        One place had all barbwire, two or three strands and loopy, little 30' by 40' pens on steel posts, no corners, the wire hanging and horses across from each other.

                        Still, in the time I was there, no horse was injured in that.

                        Here in the West, most barbed wire fences are five wire, tight and secure and not hiding in brush or beween trees.
                        In 40 years here, we only had two light cuts and in the 100+ years raising all kinds of horses here, I think you can count on one hand any injuries and those would have happened no matter which fence you had, like a mountain lion running some yearlings thru a fence once.

                        Sure, if you don't have to use it around horses, if you have other ways to fence your horses, of course there are better fences.

                        If that fence is already there and in good repair and not in a hidden spot, where something may run into it and no horses across that fence to play and get into it, why not work with what you have?

                        Now, if you really only have 100', I will say, wire is very hard to keep tight in that short a distance.
                        You either have to stretch it until it almost breaks, or it will just not stay tight very long.
                        100' is such a short distance, it is hardly worth worrying about it.
                        Take it down and put something you won't have by any chance need to regret later, if something gets into it.

                        One of the worst injuries I saw was a horse flipping over a nice board fence and degloving from his knee to into his shoulder.
                        He fell into a snow drift, or he may just have broken his neck also.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by mayfair View Post
                          We added hot wire in front of the barbed wire rather than take it all down. Someday we might redo the fence but for now adding the hotwire was cheapest and easiest. We have a small pasture so the barbed wire is a concern. Like others, I don't think it would be much of an issue in a large pasture with plenty of grass.
                          This is your most practical solution. When I was in college I boarded at a farm that came with barb wire when the owners got it. They had big pastures but ran hot wire inside anyway and did not have problems.

                          Even in a big pasture, I would not just have barbed wire. I know someone who lost her horse to barbed wire and have seen another horse cut all over by it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Tiki View Post
                            I can't imagine taking it down - especially that much. I'm sure the wire with the barbs on it is just stiff enough to whip around and slash my face if I were to ever try.

                            Is there any way, with the metal posts, to run a rail across the top of the wire - either wood or some kind of tubular thing for better visibility? and the also run a wire offset of 6-8 inches with a hot wire inside?
                            This is where the use of the Horse Guard tape is so "handy". You buy t post caps. The caps have a bracket that holds the tape. It is an inch and a half wide so very visible. The whole process is quick, cheap and easy and will turn an "accident waiting to happen" fence into a safe fence.
                            Patty
                            www.rivervalefarm.com
                            Follow us on facebook - https://www.facebook.com/pages/River...ref=ts&fref=ts

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Since you don't own the property yet, you *could* make it a condition of sale that all the barbed wire is removed. Just a thought.

                              (You could ask that the posts remain).
                              https://www.facebook.com/SugarMapleFarm
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                              • #16
                                Originally posted by SMF11 View Post
                                Since you don't own the property yet, you *could* make it a condition of sale that all the barbed wire is removed. Just a thought.

                                (You could ask that the posts remain).
                                I think this is a really good idea. If you really don't want it (and I wouldn't want it either), ask in the offer that the sellers to take it down before closing.


                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  While I'd never install barbed wire, I can (and do) live with what was already here when I bought the place. I've replaced a lot of it, and small pastures are barbed wire free (that's where the young stupid horses are)but it remains along 3 sides of the big pasture, where the old mares spend their time. Injuries are rare and minor- horses usually don't mess with fence in large areas. I really don't have a problem with the stuff in certain situations.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by Bluey View Post
                                    100' of barwire?
                                    You can just buy 10 10' panels and wire them to that fence to protect your horses at less ...d then put whatever you like there.
                                    LOL - not 100 feet - she said 100 acres!

                                    But I certainly would consider if the areas are big that the wire would not be a problem, and that adding a hot wire just inside it would be appropriat, along with panels on the corners, or where they might come to the fence on a regular basis. But my evaluation would be subjective to the particular place.
                                    Airborne? Oh. Yes, he can take a joke. Once. After that, the joke's on you.

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                                    • #19
                                      Originally posted by AnotherRound View Post
                                      LOL - not 100 feet - she said 100 acres!

                                      But I certainly would consider if the areas are big that the wire would not be a problem, and that adding a hot wire just inside it would be appropriat, along with panels on the corners, or where they might come to the fence on a regular basis. But my evaluation would be subjective to the particular place.
                                      Thank you for making that clear, at 100' it didn't make much sense not to just change that bit of fence anyway.

                                      At 100 acres, if that is a good, tight fence, without sharp corners, or half hidden in bushes and trees, the easiest for now seems to be to add hot wire to it somehow and keep a clear, larger path mowed and short around it, so horses learn it is there.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        My farm is a tenth of the size of the one in question, but was perimeter fenced with barbed wire when we bought it. I took all the barbed wire down by hand before we moved the horses here. I rolled it up, tied the rolls (small ones, lots) off and took them to the dump. Today if I had to do it over I'd advertise them for free on cl, but I'd still take it down myself. That way I know it's all gone.
                                        My neighbor up in Live Oak had a 40 acre pasture fenced with BW. His horses lived there for many, many years with no problem. They were older appys and well used to it.
                                        Then about six months before I moved his sweet old mare (28, I think) somehow got a leg caught in the fence. Imagine someone cutting a hind leg off, most of the way, above the hock, with a chain saw.
                                        I will never forget the sight of that poor, sweet mare, still alive. Nor will I ever forget the sound of the two shotgun blasts it took to take her pain away.
                                        It's a personal thing, I guess. But my subconscious will not let me put horses out in barbed wire.
                                        "Reason is, and ought to be, the slave of passions." David Hume

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