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landscape toxic ??

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  • landscape toxic ??

    I have horse property and one of the neighboring properties are "not" horse people. I need a fast growing evergreen to screen the property. There is a hill involved so the tree/shrub needs to get tall to properly screen my horses.

    I found something I really like and want to plant and have looked all over the internet to see if it's toxic to horses and haven't been able to find any information.

    podocarpus henkelii is what I want to plant.

    I need to plant this at the property line before the neighbor plants oleanders. She made the comment that she was going to do that and anyone that would say that doesn't need to be around horses. Oh well. You cannot pick your neighbors. I do wish you could

    Or if you have a screen plant you like I would love the name of it.
    Thanks.
    Live in the sunshine.
    Swim in the sea.
    Drink the wild air.

  • #2
    Are your fence lines on the property boundary? If so, not too much you can do to prevent your neighbour from planting oleanders, which are gorgeous fast growing evergreens, but toxic. I would probably write a nice polite registered letter to that neighbour with a fact sheet on toxicity of the plants and some suggestions and links to non toxic landscaping, along with your intention to plant a screen of non toxic hedging. I would also probably run a line of hot wire about 6 feet inside the fenceline to prevent your horses from reaching the nieghbour's plantings of any sort.

    What I did at my place was to build my fencelines about 6 feet inside the property line, to avoid my horses nibbling the sh!te that my neighbour sprays on her monoculture, clearcut 2 acres. I did write a nice polite registered letter to her about that.

    Of course, then she chose to completely ignore the legal boundary and started treating my property outside my fence as if it was her own. (spraying, dumping lawn clippings etc) I ended up having to put hot wire 3 inches inside the property boundary to keep HER off. And I replanted all the native shrubbery she had managed to "ROUND-UP" out of existence on my land.

    Some of these might be suitable:

    http://www.laspilitas.com/garden/Cal...ve_hedges.html
    "The Threat of Internet Ignorance: ... we are witnessing the rise of an age of equestrian disinformation, one where a trusting public can graze on nonsense packaged to look like fact."-LRG-AF

    Comment


    • #3
      Podocarpus isn't Yew, which is deadly, but my advice is to make a tree pen for it, or a dedicated aisle. Put some purty but impenetrable fence up at your property line and then a good horse fence about 8 foot inside. Honestly, my mom used to pitch her clippings over the fence into the horse pasture back there all the time, and drain her pool water and a whole bunch of other things . Be attractively proactive.

      BTW, nice site COL. My dad grew ceanothus and they are really lovely and require almost zero care.
      Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
      Incredible Invisible

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by CatOnLap View Post
        Are your fence lines on the property boundary? If so, not too much you can do to prevent your neighbour from planting oleanders, which are gorgeous fast growing evergreens, but toxic. I would probably write a nice polite registered letter to that neighbour with a fact sheet on toxicity of the plants and some suggestions and links to non toxic landscaping, along with your intention to plant a screen of non toxic hedging. I would also probably run a line of hot wire about 6 feet inside the fenceline to prevent your horses from reaching the nieghbour's plantings of any sort.

        What I did at my place was to build my fencelines about 6 feet inside the property line, to avoid my horses nibbling the sh!te that my neighbour sprays on her monoculture, clearcut 2 acres. I did write a nice polite registered letter to her about that.

        Of course, then she chose to completely ignore the legal boundary and started treating my property outside my fence as if it was her own. (spraying, dumping lawn clippings etc) I ended up having to put hot wire 3 inches inside the property boundary to keep HER off. And I replanted all the native shrubbery she had managed to "ROUND-UP" out of existence on my land.

        Some of these might be suitable:

        http://www.laspilitas.com/garden/Cal...ve_hedges.html


        All good advice.
        I have had similar issues with my neighbors. I also fenced 6' inside my property lines to avoid neighbor problems. But the worst thing I had happen was when my idiot neighbors called me in a panic saying that I HAD to catch up my stallion and put him in a stall. The MORONS had just bought themselves a wild mustang stallion and they had thoughtfully tacked a 40' x 40' "paddock" for him right to MY fence!!!!!!!!!!! (Can you tell I still get irked thinking about this? LOL).
        "Reason is, and ought to be, the slave of passions." David Hume

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          Yes the chain link fence and where I want to plant is at the property line. It is a good distance from my horses (approximately 50 feet) I want to plant it more for a screen and privacy because the children at that home are - - well "extremely" active. I have four kids of my own so I know how kids are... but these are over the top. I want privacy and protection for my animals.

          As far as the oleander - I have kindly asked her not to plant it several times explaining it is toxic to horses and we have a lot of horses around. And I did provide her with a fact sheet. She was mad about something the other day and told me the following -

          Well, it's just a landscaping issue, I will plant oleander and the horses will go away....

          I was in total shock this what was said... My only solution is to plant a huge screen/wall of plants to protect my family.

          Thanks for all the ideas!!!
          Live in the sunshine.
          Swim in the sea.
          Drink the wild air.

          Comment


          • #6
            If Silverthorn (I think that's what it's called, but it doesn't have thorns) grows in your area (it does here in FL), it makes a great, thick, fast growing, attractive barrier. And my horses have munched on it enough that I don't think it could be toxic to them.
            It gets thick enough that the kids next door couldn't offer a flower to your horses through it.
            "Reason is, and ought to be, the slave of passions." David Hume

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by doublesstable View Post
              Well, it's just a landscaping issue, I will plant oleander and the horses will go away....
              reply:
              "Yes, but your legal problems would be just beginning."

              Too bad you didn't get that on tape.
              Life is what happens while you are busy making other plans

              Comment


              • #8
                What about something like Bamboo? It grows fast. Not sure of its toxicity though.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Bamboo is non-toxic. It is a favorite browse at the zoo I go to school at. It's actually a grass.
                  "Reason is, and ought to be, the slave of passions." David Hume

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Bamboo is a NIGHTMARE to contain, though and will run rampant given half a chance.

                    I don't know how Leyland Cypress grow in your area - but here they are WONDERFUL at providing a fast-growing, tall border.

                    Also, barberry creates a nice PHYSICAL border.... nasty little plants although they don't do much for visual screening (bet she and the kids don't come through it, too!).

                    Good luck - and I'd probably also put up a privacy fence as well between the property lines - nice, tall, wired to shock the hades out of them.... (just kidding).
                    Originally posted by SmartAlex

                    Give it up. Many of us CoTHers are trapped at a computer all day with no way out, and we hunt in packs. So far it as all been in good fun. You should be thankful for that.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Check with your local ag extension agent regarding non-toxic plants to grow in your area. Hot wire your fence line to discourage her invasion of your property and then run a second electric fence 8-12 feet inside (make an alley with it and wide enough you can get a horse up/down it without them eating what's on her side). Document her comments.

                      You might also point out to her that oleander is also toxic to people so hopefully she has no children, grandchildren, nieces, nephews or visitors with offspring. Check your local laws as well...in some areas oleander is banned.
                      Colored Cowhorse Ranch
                      www.coloredcowhorseranch.com
                      Northern NV

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        There are some non-invasive bamboo varieties, though I don't know how well they grow there.

                        If indeed Leyland Cyprus is non-toxic, then that's a great option. They grow *fast*, and if you do a double line with staggered plants, you'll have no-see-um barrier in no me. Warning though, they get TALL.
                        ______________________________
                        The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Sounds like your horses are off the fence line where you're wanting to plant? I'd plant something prickly, to deter any intrusion (be they adult, child or unrestrained animal) from her side ;-)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Before planting barberry, check around - it is considered invasive in some areas.
                            ______________________________
                            The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

                            Comment

                            • Original Poster

                              #15
                              Originally posted by coloredcowhorse View Post
                              Check with your local ag extension agent regarding non-toxic plants to grow in your area. Hot wire your fence line to discourage her invasion of your property and then run a second electric fence 8-12 feet inside (make an alley with it and wide enough you can get a horse up/down it without them eating what's on her side). Document her comments.

                              You might also point out to her that oleander is also toxic to people so hopefully she has no children, grandchildren, nieces, nephews or visitors with offspring. Check your local laws as well...in some areas oleander is banned.
                              I have discussed with her that this is toxic to children as well. She does have "floods" of children, grandchildren... etc etc... doesn't matter to her.

                              I called my landscape guy and gave him the names of a few of the plants you guys suggested. THANKS SO MUCH.
                              Live in the sunshine.
                              Swim in the sea.
                              Drink the wild air.

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                Originally posted by oldenmare View Post
                                Bamboo is a NIGHTMARE to contain, though and will run rampant given half a chance.

                                I don't know how Leyland Cypress grow in your area - but here they are WONDERFUL at providing a fast-growing, tall border.

                                Also, barberry creates a nice PHYSICAL border.... nasty little plants although they don't do much for visual screening (bet she and the kids don't come through it, too!).

                                Good luck - and I'd probably also put up a privacy fence as well between the property lines - nice, tall, wired to shock the hades out of them.... (just kidding).
                                Thanks for the laugh... I will check out the cypress; they are beautiful.
                                Live in the sunshine.
                                Swim in the sea.
                                Drink the wild air.

                                Comment

                                • Original Poster

                                  #17
                                  Originally posted by SmartAlex View Post
                                  reply:
                                  "Yes, but your legal problems would be just beginning."

                                  Too bad you didn't get that on tape.
                                  I sooo wish I had thought of that come-back... I just said I was in shock she would say something like that and it's too bad she bought horse property without horses.
                                  Live in the sunshine.
                                  Swim in the sea.
                                  Drink the wild air.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    nasty sort isn't she? We've seen more than one kiddy attracted by the cup shaped yewberries or the oleander "grapes" in our emergency room for poisoning.

                                    I am a horse person who has Yew, Oleander, rhododendron, mountain laurel and some other sorts of toxic stuff growing in my yard. They are very attractive plants. The horses won't touch them the odd time they stray into the yard and the yard is well fenced from stray children.

                                    The California Lilac ( the first group of plants on the site I linked) are really really nice plants, I've been trying to kill mine for 15 years and it just keeps growing despite the neighbour's solid 7 foot high fence screening it from all sunlight, absolutely no fertilizer or extra water ( unless you count the dogs'efforts LOL). It blooms happily, smells lovely and would make an excellent hedge.
                                    "The Threat of Internet Ignorance: ... we are witnessing the rise of an age of equestrian disinformation, one where a trusting public can graze on nonsense packaged to look like fact."-LRG-AF

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