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Brockwood Stall Shi*fter - anyone have one?

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  • Brockwood Stall Shi*fter - anyone have one?

    They look interesting!

    Anyone seen one in action? I was talking to someone today who had, but I'd love to get more than one opinion!
    -Jessica

  • #2
    I've never seen the sense in them.
    Looks like it would take more time and effort to move the damn thing around than to pick up a pitchfork and muck the stall...
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.

    Comment


    • #3
      The last place I boarded in had one of these. The BO was always looking for a faster easier way to do 20 stalls.

      I used to help do stalls in the mornings for fun.

      I did one side of the aisle and he did the other. I beat his stall sifter thing every time. (it was the same model as the one you listed)

      It does work well in sifting and fluffing up the bedding.

      But it's really no faster. You have to sweep a big clean spot in the stall to park the thing over, otherwise you're just sifting clean bedding onto dirty bedding.

      Then you place a muck bucket or wheelbarrow next to it to catch the manure. So the spot you swept has to be big enough to fit that too.

      Then plug it in and fork or shovel the bedding into the top of it. So you're still lifting all the bedding, just not shaking it. You have to work around the shaking machine and the muck bucket/barrow.

      When all the bedding has gone through it, you still have to pick up and dump the wet spots. You can't sift those or you just redistribute urine into the clean bedding.

      You unplug it and wheel it back out of the stall and then use your fork to spread the cleaned bedding back around again.

      Then you're finally done and can move on to the next stall. It only sifts through a stall as fast as you can shovel the dirty bedding onto the top of it and it's not low, so you're lifting dirty bedding higher than normal.

      And there's stall prep for all the sweeping/moving the dirty bedding to park the machine and poop-catcher on.

      I can do 10 stalls in the time it takes that machine to do 5 or 6. It's a lot slower overall. But if you have a shoulder issue or something that shaking a fork hurts, it might be a help maybe.

      Otherwise I'd say don't waste yoour money or time on it.
      You jump in the saddle,
      Hold onto the bridle!
      Jump in the line!
      ...Belefonte

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Originally posted by MistyBlue View Post
        I can do 10 stalls in the time it takes that machine to do 5 or 6. It's a lot slower overall. But if you have a shoulder issue or something that shaking a fork hurts, it might be a help maybe.
        This is my issue. My shoulders are absolute junk. At 29. Joint supps, and constant pain.. I'm waiting 'till I have health insurance ( ) before I investigate, but... they are sore as hell most of the time.
        Even if it takes the same amount of time as I do now, it seems like there would be less wear and tear (and I could set up my stall cleaning failure hubby with it when I'm gone/can't do stalls and they'd still end up cleaner than they do now.. )
        -Jessica

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Ghazzu View Post
          I've never seen the sense in them.
          Looks like it would take more time and effort to move the damn thing around than to pick up a pitchfork and muck the stall...
          This.
          www.Somermistfarm.com
          Quality Hunter Ponies

          Comment


          • #6
            From the website, ***Total time to complete horse stall cleaning 5 to 6 minutes. Average time with manure fork is 17 minutes in a 12 x 12 horse stall bedded 3 inches deep with sawchip/shavings.


            Um, what kind of slow people take that long to clean a freakin' stall?
            I can clean FOUR stalls, dang near spotless, in less than 10 minutes.
            I am anal about stalls too. I'm so anal I'm known to get on my hands and knees for inspection!!
            In under 20 minutes, I can also turn out said four horses and prep stalls with hay and fresh water too!!!

            Is that thing a joke?!!

            Comment


            • #7
              This is my issue. My shoulders are absolute junk. At 29. Joint supps, and constant pain.. I'm waiting 'till I have health insurance ( ) before I investigate, but... they are sore as hell most of the time.
              Even if it takes the same amount of time as I do now, it seems like there would be less wear and tear (and I could set up my stall cleaning failure hubby with it when I'm gone/can't do stalls and they'd still end up cleaner than they do now.. )
              Then yes, it will save wear and tear on your shoulders from shaking the fork.

              However, it might bother your shoulders to do the extra prep work and especially lifting the dirty bedding so high to get it into the shaker. IIRC that shaker was a bit over waist height on me. I'm short but it was probably a good 3' tall at the platform where the dirty bedding goes.

              About the same height give or take if you take a muck bucket and put it on the floor open side down, then stack another one on top right way up. Try that if you have 2 muck buckets (or put a muck bucket on a hay bale) and scoop full forks of bedding into it and see if that seems to bother your shoulders. It would stink if you buy one and the higher heavy lifting hurts.

              I know how it feels though...both my shoulders are crap too.

              I found using pelleted bedding and a basket fork means I can pick out the dirty stuff better without scooping up tons of clean bedding too. It sifts better so less lifting and less sifting. And stalls done faster because it's easier to clean.

              Too bad they don;t make self-cleaning stalls like they make self-cleaning litterboxes.
              You jump in the saddle,
              Hold onto the bridle!
              Jump in the line!
              ...Belefonte

              Comment


              • #8
                Our barn owns one and the stall cleaners won't touch it. It's loud, big, you need to drag an extension cord around to use it, plus a pick and wheelbarrow; it becomes way more hassle than it's worth!

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  MB - I already use pelleted bedding and the basket fork - Couldn't survive without them!!! I'm not sold on the whole sifter idea, but.. it looks interesting. I'd love to take one on trial and see for myself how one would work in my barn. I think the shoveling wouldn't be as bad as the sifting -but I'll give the lifting the shovel to the height you described a try before I give it really serious thought for sure. Thanks!
                  I really wish I could just take MSM and be all good... but. No luck. I keep hoping I can talk my vet into taking some xrays of my shoulders to get an idea of what's really going on in there... but am afraid that if I go to a human Dr it'll go on record and when I can afford health insurance, it won't cover the shoulder stuff...
                  -Jessica

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Is it in your rotator cuffs?
                    Or more of an all over shoulder or upper back pain?

                    Massages can help a whole lot. And they don't go on your medical records. Have you tried that? I've been told by a few doctors that many times shoulder pain is eased by massage, even if the massage does nothing for the actual cause of the pain the shoulder muscles can become sore from the problem and the massage can ease some of the discomfort.

                    I bought one of those back massagers you set up on a chair. They're about $100. Not cheap, but worth it. This way I can massage somewhat when I feel I need it instead of making an appointment.

                    I also use a heating pad with good effect. I can either lay it on the back of the couch and watch TV while heating up the ouchy parts or sleep on it. Those thermacare heat patches for the shoulders are also a big help.
                    You jump in the saddle,
                    Hold onto the bridle!
                    Jump in the line!
                    ...Belefonte

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      I LOVE massages. They don't help much with the shoulder stuff though Back stuff, you bet! Shoulders... notsomuch. I think it's rotator cuff issues... in the joint, in the center-top. Hurts most when I lift my arm up and sideways at the same time (pouring draft beers when I was a bartender would sometimes leave me close to tears - a cross between intense pain and a feeling of weakness as well). The shoulder pain almost goes away in the summer when 99% of the horses are out and I'm not cleaning stalls every day...
                      I need to ask my chiropractor if he has any suggestions too - they are very "whole body" minded at the clinic, and they may very well have some ideas.

                      I should try the Thermacare shoulder patches! Hadn't really thought of that. They are still a "newfangled" thing in my book... I keep forgetting they exist
                      -Jessica

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by AppJumpr08 View Post
                        I LOVE massages. They don't help much with the shoulder stuff though Back stuff, you bet! Shoulders... notsomuch. I think it's rotator cuff issues... in the joint, in the center-top. Hurts most when I lift my arm up and sideways at the same time (pouring draft beers when I was a bartender would sometimes leave me close to tears - a cross between intense pain and a feeling of weakness as well). The shoulder pain almost goes away in the summer when 99% of the horses are out and I'm not cleaning stalls every day...
                        I need to ask my chiropractor if he has any suggestions too - they are very "whole body" minded at the clinic, and they may very well have some ideas.

                        I should try the Thermacare shoulder patches! Hadn't really thought of that. They are still a "newfangled" thing in my book... I keep forgetting they exist
                        It sounds like your rotator cuff. Cleaning stalls aggravates mine too - mine can never totally heal due to all the stuff I do that aggravates it. Physical therapy type exercises you can do yourself at home are the best way to help make it better - you strengthen the supporting muscles so they help more and you use the sore ones less. Google "rotator cuff exercises" and you can do them yourself at home - all you need is one of those wide elastic band things you can buy at most sports/outdoor stores. If I did my exercises every day like I should my shoulder would never hurt...
                        Donerail Farm
                        www.donerailfarm.com
                        http://donerailfarm.wordpress.com/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A friend of mine that has a 20 stall barn had her hubby build 2 of these... they claim that they can clean faster, and they get more use out of their bedding- they use a mix of sawdust and pellets. One benefit is the noise it makes- the horses all are used to the crazy sound of the shaker as it is moved through the barn. Storage is an issue- or it can be, although they made theirs so that the thing can be left upright and stored rather than flat out and taking up a lot more room...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Now if someone could invent a floor that would be safe and lift up, shake the manure out and dump it for me, (preferably on a conveyor belt that would dump outside in a dumpster or manure spreader, I'd buy it in a heartbeat.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by LauraKY View Post
                              Now if someone could invent a floor that would be safe and lift up, shake the manure out and dump it for me, (preferably on a conveyor belt that would dump outside in a dumpster or manure spreader, I'd buy it in a heartbeat.
                              My tack guy's cousin works at a farm like this. The barn was custom built, and I want to say in SC at a WP barn.

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                Originally posted by JackandMo View Post
                                My tack guy's cousin works at a farm like this. The barn was custom built, and I want to say in SC at a WP barn.
                                Do you have pictures??

                                Thanks for the rotator cuff suggestions - I'll head to the store soon and get stuff to exercise with - the idea of being able to make the pain better is a great one!
                                -Jessica

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  FWIW I have found the type of fork I use makes a HUGE difference. Once you use an aluminum handled ergonomic Dura Fork you probably won't go back to the wooden handled kind. I wish they had a better basket design though and because the aluminum handles have a slightly larger diameter than the wooden ones you can't switch them out
                                  I wasn't always a Smurf
                                  Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
                                  "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
                                  The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    at one of the PMU farms I inspected years ago, they had a conveyor system at the back of the stalls and most of the horses had learned to step back and deposit their manure on it. Saved a lot of time. I was told it is in common use in dairies in Europe and the cows also learn to step back and splat on the conveyor.

                                    You may wish to convert your stalls to a stall mattress- you know, a big rubber membraine is permanently installed over a soft mattress affair and you use minimal bedding, just enough to absorb the urine, which you scoop daily when you scoop the manure.

                                    A less expensive version is what we used to use- simply rubber stall mats over a bed of compacted and levelled sand, and minimal bedding. Again, using enough sawdust/pellets to absorb the urine- like only a few buckets full of sawdust. No shaking involved. We did that becausse the SO has a rotator cuff injury.

                                    However as my old horse got older, he developed hock sores from lying down on the bare rubber and we switched to full bedding for him again.
                                    "The Threat of Internet Ignorance: ... we are witnessing the rise of an age of equestrian disinformation, one where a trusting public can graze on nonsense packaged to look like fact."-LRG-AF

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      I will be the voice of dissent here - I LOVE this thing.

                                      Used to use it at the last barn I boarded at, where I did stalls to offset my board. I do stalls at my current barn too, by hand. The stalls at the old barn (with shifter) were always a zillion times cleaner than the stalls at the current barn.

                                      The shifter doesn't take any less time, but it does a very thorough job and it cuts down a LOT on shavings waste. A good, thorough, conscienscious stall cleaner could do as good a job by hand, but.... I haven't met that many thorough stall cleaners =) At my current barn (sans shifter) I do stalls on weekends only and I'm forever trying to make up for the shoddy job the weekday stall-cleaner does. And the stalls always stink. Visited my old barn a couple weeks ago and was floored by how nice the stalls there looked and smelled. I'd forgotten what a difference the shifter makes.

                                      Also it makes a much bigger difference for piggy horses who like to walk their manure through the stall. I'd even say it saves time on those stalls. But neat horses who leave untouched piles for you - no need for the stall shifter.

                                      Moral: If you do your own stalls every day and you know you do a good job, then you probably don't need one. But if you're hiring help, I'd think it's a worthwhile investment - saves shavings and ensures thorough cleaning.

                                      It's probably not good on your shoulder though. There's no shaking, but you do have to lift from half to all the shavings in each stall (depending on how messy the horse is) up into the shifter every time. It is a lot of lifting.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Is there room in the average size stall for the sifter, the muck bucket and a horse? Or do you have to park the horse somewhere else while it's stall is being cleaned?

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