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Pole barn with apartment?

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  • Pole barn with apartment?

    Who's built one? Which Company did you use? Anything you wish you'd done differently? Any pictures to share?

    We're looking into building a pole barn for equipment storage and also putting an apartment in it as well. It would not be shared with horses, just tractors, etc.

  • #2
    WIP

    My parents are building a Barndiminium (or however that SHOULD be spelled) out at our farm. It's 120'X40' (I think), and will be 1/3 apartment and 2/3 tractor/trailer/whatever storage.

    The exterior should be done by christmas, then it's on to the interior... So it's a little early for any woulda-shoulda's.

    Comment


    • #3
      I would like to know as well! DH has plans for one, after seeing "lee and tiffany"s from the hunting show "the crush" (yeah I know, I know). Thiers is 3/4 house 1/4 garage. Its very nice looking.
      ---^v---^v---^v----------------------^v---^v---^v---
      For a moment there, you bored me to death

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Originally posted by pinkme View Post
        I would like to know as well! DH has plans for one, after seeing "lee and tiffany"s from the hunting show "the crush" (yeah I know, I know). Thiers is 3/4 house 1/4 garage. Its very nice looking.
        Too funny. Our building will be about 45 miles from "Lee and Tiffany's" place.

        Comment


        • #5
          Build it fully to code. Ours is on concrete slab, only relationship to barn is that's a side we don't have to finish.

          Best advice we got from our builder (who lives in one) - ceramic tiles on all floors. Stay away from carpeting/anything adsorbent.

          Comment


          • #6
            Friend of mine built one in NW Montana (near Whitefish) about 15 years or so ago. 36 ft wide by 156 ft long. One half of bottom level was 10 stalls plus washroom and tackroom/office (5 stalls, 12 x 12, plus either washroom or tack/office on each side). The next 12 foot space was a storage area on one side of the aisle and stairs up to the apartment on the other side...had freezer, washer/dryer under the stairs. The other half of the lower level was a 36 x 72 foot indoor...not a huge arena area but usable for ground work and slow work with a radio cow for youngsters in the winter. The lower level had a 12 foot ceiling (well insulated) so even a silly horse going up on his hind feet wasn't likely to bang his head. Upstairs there was a 36 x 72 foot hay loft with a hay door for a hay elevator off the end of it...there were drop down chutes over each stall into a feeder so lugging hay around wasn't an issue. The other half of the upstairs (over the arena) was the apartment that was 2592 square feet (36 x 72) with 2 good sized bedrooms, a bath and a half, big living room, nice kitchen/dining area. There were bow windows so visibility was great and he built a deck off of the living/dining area and across the end of the apartment (over the outside of the arena giving a shaded area for the end of the arena as well and giving both bedrooms a wrap around deck). All plumbing was off the center line of the structure. The barn/apartment was oriented so that the hay filled loft was between the apartment and the usual wind direction, protecting the apartment from the worst weather. The entire area was surrounded by tall Ponderosa pines and great views. The horse stalls all had turn out areas and since they were under the hay loft any odor was minimal in the apartment. This structure meant that there was one foundation and one roof that essentially served for 4 structures... a barn, a hay storage area, an indoor arena and an apartment. He did almost all the work himself so it took him several years. The first year he lived in a tiny camper and joked that he had to microwave the dogs food bowl in the morning so the dog had liquid water to drink during the colder winter days/weeks. The second year he lived in what was eventually his tackroom/office space...with a space heater! It took a lot of convincing to get his permits including use of firebreak materials between apt and barn areas and upstairs/downstairs and hay storage. It wasn't cheap to do (I dont know how much total) but by doing most of the work himself and just getting what absolutely had to be contracted he saved a bundle.
            Colored Cowhorse Ranch
            www.coloredcowhorseranch.com
            Northern NV

            Comment


            • #7
              Just check your building codes first, and stick to them. What works in one state may not be to code in another. And there is also an insurance consideration. Some things like storage of large volumes of flammable materials (hay) preclude being able to obtain anything like homowners or renters insurance for that structure.

              Comment


              • #8
                Being in the planning stage, there are some considerations that should be given serious thought.
                Try to make the house part on the flat, not on a second level, at least not the main part.
                Most horse people at times can't handle stairs, not several times a day, from injuries, some that may be permanent.
                Any dwelling built today needs to consider sensible handicapped access and second floor of a barn structure is not.
                You could have spare bedrooms and one bathroom for them upstairs, but the main house makes more sense to be at ground level.

                Also, with what we know today, don't store hay in volume in any other place than a separate structure, please.

                The amount of dust and molds are not good for horses or people, not even talking about the combustible issue.
                Then, much hay today comes in big bales and in some years, hay may come in pallets or even sacks any more, in a way that is handled with pallet points on some kind of tractor/skidloader, not an elevator to a high loft, so you may have an empty loft.

                Just more to think about.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by molliwog View Post
                  Just check your building codes first, and stick to them. What works in one state may not be to code in another. And there is also an insurance consideration. Some things like storage of large volumes of flammable materials (hay) preclude being able to obtain anything like homowners or renters insurance for that structure.

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    The apartment will be all on the first floor. We're thinking of spray insulation for the entire building and the radiant heat in the floor.

                    Two bedrooms, one with it's own bath, mud/laundry/half bath combo that is also an entrance from the building into the apartment. The main living area will be very open, kitchen with island/bar the is open to a dining area and the living room.

                    I'd love to see similar designs online but can't find much. I'd like to dress it up a little and not have it look entirely like a big square building. I saw one with stacked stone around the bottom that was pretty.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Check out this site. This manufacturer is based in Ontario but it might give you some ideas.

                      I have seen a garage/storage building of theirs with a fully completed loft apartment upstairs. Lovely!

                      http://www.dencosheds.ca/dencosheds/index.html

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Our farm has a gorgeous facility with an apt above the indoor..
                        All I know is the builder was an Amish company going by the last name King out of Lancaster PA.

                        Ours is on the 2nd level, but yes- the radiant heat is a must! At least in the bathroom and other tile areas. The hardwood floors are not as bad.

                        Chances are your builder can show you some options to dress it up..if they specialize in pole buildings then they know all about big square buildings! lol

                        Good luck!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Sparky Boy View Post
                          The apartment will be all on the first floor. We're thinking of spray insulation for the entire building and the radiant heat in the floor.

                          We moved into our new home 18 months ago. We built on a slab and used the spray insulation and the radiant heat in the floor. We oriented the front of the house to have a southern exposure and the outside is stone.

                          This is the outside. http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pi...00000524258440

                          The radiant heat is SOOOO warm. We have a system that uses a Reni gas heater and have 3 zones for heat. 1.The main room, which is living, dining, kitchen, small office and half bath 2.The Master bedroom 3.The master bathroom and walk in closets. With this setup we can keep the master bath warmest, the main room warm and the bed room cooler. I had laid out my clothes for the morning ride on the closet floor the night before, and when I got dressed it was like I had just gotten them out of the dryer. We have a central air system as well. We only use the radiant heat when the daytime temps don't get above 50. Otherwise the floors will make the house too warm, due to the southern exposure and the stone.

                          With the concrete floor, we choose to do a stamped pattern and have it colored. It looks like a wide plank wood floor. I don't have any photos of the floor on facebook, but if wanted to see I could email them to you. Just pm me.

                          Best of luck with your new endeavor!!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Check zoning, insurance, and anything else that can prohibit such uses.

                            Comment

                            • Original Poster

                              #15
                              Originally posted by jawa View Post
                              We moved into our new home 18 months ago. We built on a slab and used the spray insulation and the radiant heat in the floor. We oriented the front of the house to have a southern exposure and the outside is stone.

                              This is the outside. http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pi...00000524258440

                              The radiant heat is SOOOO warm. We have a system that uses a Reni gas heater and have 3 zones for heat. 1.The main room, which is living, dining, kitchen, small office and half bath 2.The Master bedroom 3.The master bathroom and walk in closets. With this setup we can keep the master bath warmest, the main room warm and the bed room cooler. I had laid out my clothes for the morning ride on the closet floor the night before, and when I got dressed it was like I had just gotten them out of the dryer. We have a central air system as well. We only use the radiant heat when the daytime temps don't get above 50. Otherwise the floors will make the house too warm, due to the southern exposure and the stone.

                              With the concrete floor, we choose to do a stamped pattern and have it colored. It looks like a wide plank wood floor. I don't have any photos of the floor on facebook, but if wanted to see I could email them to you. Just pm me.

                              Best of luck with your new endeavor!!
                              THANKS. I'd love to see pictures of the floor. Stamped concrete is a great idea.

                              Comment

                              • Original Poster

                                #16
                                Originally posted by jawa View Post

                                Adorable!! Love it.

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