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Peeps with coated wire (hotcote, white lightening, etc.) fencing...chime in please!

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  • Peeps with coated wire (hotcote, white lightening, etc.) fencing...chime in please!

    I'm looking for affordable, nice looking fencing ideas. I need something that will keep horses in as well (busy road nearby) and am not comfortable doing tape as the perimeter fence (also not interested in braid/rope fencing). Would love to pick your brain on the coated wire fencing, as this is what I'm leaning towards:

    1. How long have you had it installed, what brand, and do you like it?

    2. What type of posts did you use (material, demension, depth set) for line posts:

    How wide are your corner brace posts?

    3. Did you paint your posts, which color, how often do you need to touch up paint?

    4. Did you pound them in or place them in a dug hole. Concrete or no?

    5. How many strands did you do and how far apart did you place them? Did you use any other type of fencing (debating about the "board" look for the top rail).

    6. How many/which are hot?

    7. Did you DIY?

    8. Can you get a good charge on this stuff?

    I better stop or I will scare everyone away. Any other thoughts??

    Would LOVE to see pictures!!!
    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/
  • Original Poster

    #2
    I should add that there is this small part of me that wants a goat...in case anyone wants to chime in on how impossible it would be to use this type of fencing with a goat...
    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/

    Comment


    • #3
      We have non hot high tensile white coated wire on 3/4 of our fence. It's on the cheapy landscape posts (we bought the place pre fenced) pounded in. We had the braces redone about 4 years ago. The road frontage fence is three board, both for looks and strength.

      One of my horses ran right through the coated fence a couple years ago in fear. Took out the tensioners and all five wires, but didn't hurt himself. He found it pretty easy to panic through it, so not so sure on your idea of safety. My horses respect it pretty well, except for sticking their heads through to eat grass on the other side, which caused much popping out of the staples. I had to add a line of electric to keep heads in.

      If I could do it fresh, I would put up Electrobraid where now it's coated wire. Still do a front nice fence.
      "As a rule we disbelieve all the facts and theories for which we have no use."- William James
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Proud member of the Wheat Loss Clique.

      Comment


      • #4
        Electric wire fence keeps my goats in, but the bottom strands are closer together than needed for horses and the charger is VERY POWERFUL.

        I also 'trained' the goats to the fence...ie made them touch it..

        They sure as heck stay where they're supposed to though now.
        K-N-S Farm
        Daily Goat Videos & Pictures
        Website | Facebook | Youtube

        Comment


        • #5
          We have such fence and love it. We did the 2.5 acres worth of perimeter fencing ourselves and the cost, including paying an out of work friend to help, was about $4,000. That included all the posts, the concrete, 300' of 4' no-climb, the wire, the insulators/t-post caps/tensioners, energizer, gates and labor.

          1. How long have you had it installed, what brand, and do you like it?
          We've got Gallagher Equifence (coated, tensile, electrified), put it in April 2009, and love it.

          2. What type of posts did you use (material, demension, depth set) for line posts:
          We've got 6" round wood posts for the corners, sunk 2.5'. Line posts are 6' t-posts, sunk to 48" (ground doesn't freeze here) and spaced 20' apart. All appropriately capped.

          How wide are your corner brace posts?
          Brace posts are also 6" round wood posts set at 10'. The braces are 4" round wood rails and tensioned wire (per Gallagher specs).

          3. Did you paint your posts, which color, how often do you need to touch up paint?
          They're not painted - as they age, they'll match the rustic 3 rail fence that my husband has built at the front of the barn and around the front / back yards.

          4. Did you pound them in or place them in a dug hole. Concrete or no?

          We used a post hole driller (1 man auger) to put in the wood posts and then concreted them in (used the 1 yard mixer from the concrete supplier). The t-posts were pounded by hand.

          5. How many strands did you do and how far apart did you place them? Did you use any other type of fencing (debating about the "board" look for the top rail).
          We have 3 strands that are 2', 3' and 4' off of the ground. If I were fencing in goats or sheep I'd add at least one more lower strand, and maybe 2. The top strand is white, for visibility, and the two lower strands are black. We matched the post caps and the strand insulators and really like the look.

          6. How many/which are hot?

          All 3 strands are hot. We don't have to run a ground wire here (just put ground rods in near the energizer) as the ground is damp year round)

          7. Did you DIY?
          My husband and a friend put in all of the fence in a week (took it off of work). They did 1/4 mile of perimeter fence, plus 300' of no-climb (paddock that we sometimes use as a dog/hen yard) and hung the gates (one 12', two 6', one 4'). I helped pull and tension the actual wire (took 6 hours) on the weekend.

          8. Can you get a good charge on this stuff?

          Last time I checked (when hooking up tape for cross-fencing) the fence tester was showing it at 8,000 volts. It's hot and we haven't had any problems with the horses testing it. In fact, Mike has to weedwack during the summer to keep the weeds off of it as they won't reach under.

          Comment


          • #6
            1. How long have you had it installed, what brand, and do you like it?
            Professionally installed 6 years ago. Centaur coated wire for 3 lines, top rail 4" with 2 wires in it.
            Wire under that can carry the charge, but so far I haven't hooked up a charger.
            Like Melelio, the only problem is horses sticking heads through - which thins manes for the equivalent of the Equine Combover
            2. What type of posts did you use (material, demension, depth set) for line posts:
            6" round treated posts set at 12'
            How wide are your corner brace posts?
            Sorry - cannot answer for sure w/o going out to check - I believe 6" also

            3. Did you paint your posts, which color, how often do you need to touch up paint?
            Not painted
            4. Did you pound them in or place them in a dug hole. Concrete or no?
            Mechanically pounded, no concrete

            5. How many strands did you do and how far apart did you place them? Did you use any other type of fencing (debating about the "board" look for the top rail).
            3 strands with top rail. About 12" between each line.
            I wanted the rail for visibility (for the horses), but in hindsight a 4th wire would have been fine and less visible (to me - I like to see them out there & the rail blocks part of that)
            6. How many/which are hot?
            None hot right now

            I'd like a goat too, but I'm pretty sure I'd either have to run no-climb all around the fenceline or add electric.

            BTW: what don't you like about the braided wire?
            *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
            Steppin' Out 1988-2004
            Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
            Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015

            Comment


            • #7
              1. How long have you had it installed, what brand, and do you like it?
              Brand is Ramm. 4.25" flex fense top rail, 4 lines of 5/15 coated wire and one top line of electric rope. Installed originally in 2004 by Mr Blue and I, re-done this past spring.

              2. What type of posts did you use (material, demension, depth set) for line posts:
              Can't remember type of wood, 6" line round line posts. Set 3' deep, 10-12' apart.
              How wide are your corner brace posts?
              8" rounds for corners, ends and gate posts. Braced and set in concrete.
              3. Did you paint your posts, which color, how often do you need to touch up paint?
              Painted posts to match the white fencing. So white paint for the posts, used a thick type with mildewcide in it. Painted almost 7 years ago and not repainted since. Still look good.

              4. Did you pound them in or place them in a dug hole. Concrete or no?
              First time we augered holes, refilling one foot at a time and tamping the heck out of it each step for line posts. Concrete in all end, gate and corner posts. Second time pounded by pro fencers...HUGE difference. Much better, they're tight as ticks.
              5. How many strands did you do and how far apart did you place them? Did you use any other type of fencing (debating about the "board" look for the top rail).
              4 strands coated wire placed about 12" apart. Those aren't hot. Other type of fencing is the top rail of flex fence and slightly above that the electric braided rope.
              6. How many/which are hot?
              Just the top strand.

              7. Did you DIY?
              First time yes, and never again. Second time no, pros did it. However I have to say that Mr Blue and I stink at fencing. Folks more handy would probably do a fine job. Ours looked good for the first 3 years or so. Then slowly started leaning and looking drunk. And we never had it straight to begin with. But despite looking funky it still worked fantastic.

              8. Can you get a good charge on this stuff?
              Yep, electric charger made for about 10x more fence than we have hooked up to it. Also only top of fence so no worry about weeds grounding it.

              Here's a photo of our fencing:




              Now if you want to keep in goats, may I suggest:
              http://www.photoatlas.com/photo/china_great_wall.jpg
              You jump in the saddle,
              Hold onto the bridle!
              Jump in the line!
              ...Belefonte

              Comment


              • #8
                1. How long have you had it installed, what brand, and do you like it?
                System Fencing, coated wire and it was done a little over a year ago. I moved it 18 months ago.

                2. What type of posts did you use (material, demension, depth set) for line posts:
                Rough cut 4 x 4 hemlock posts, 3 foot deep.

                How wide are your corner brace posts?
                Rough cut 5 x 5 hemlock posts, 3 foot deep as well.

                3. Did you paint your posts, which color, how often do you need to touch up paint?
                No. And I won't do it. Too much hassle! I picked the brown wire so really, it matches perfectly with "natural" wood.

                4. Did you pound them in or place them in a dug hole. Concrete or no?
                Holes were dug by my neighbours, and we didn't use concrete but compacting sand for every post.

                5. How many strands did you do and how far apart did you place them? Did you use any other type of fencing (debating about the "board" look for the top rail).
                I used a 1" tension wire top rail for visibility and then, 4 strands of the coated wire. It goes up to 56", if my memory is correct, and there are 12" from the ground to the first row and then, 11" between each of them.

                6. How many/which are hot?
                None of them are hot, it wasn't recommended for durability. They recommended that I add a separate row of electric fencing to keep them off the fence. I added a top electric wire and one at the second row (or 24" off the ground) to keep them from leaning through the fence to eat the proverbial green grass on the other side.

                7. Did you DIY?
                Yup, excepted for the posts.

                It is extremely safe. I've had a weanling decide to jump over (dressage/hunter bred) and didn't quite make it. He ripped the tensionner off, but he was without a mark. I also had my Chestnut Elephant (1,500lbs+ (real weight on a scale! ) mare) run through it one night, snapped the post off. Again, no one injured. But in her and his defense, they both did it before the electric wire was added.
                www.EquusMagnificus.ca
                Breeding & Sales
                Facebook | YouTube

                Comment


                • #9
                  1. How long have you had it installed, what brand, and do you like it?

                  My dad and I installed 1500 feet along the back of my pasture this fall, and partitioned a field with it.

                  2. What type of posts did you use (material, demension, depth set) for line posts:

                  3.5", 7.5' treated pine posts, driven in for the lines.

                  How wide are your corner brace posts?

                  6-7", 8' treated pine.

                  3. Did you paint your posts, which color, how often do you need to touch up paint?

                  No paint

                  4. Did you pound them in or place them in a dug hole. Concrete or no?

                  Pounded, no concrete

                  5. How many strands did you do and how far apart did you place them? Did you use any other type of fencing (debating about the "board" look for the top rail).

                  5 strands, top and second from bottom electrified.

                  6. How many/which are hot? 2, see above

                  7. Did you DIY? yes

                  8. Can you get a good charge on this stuff? yes, same as other fencing. Must have a good ground, that's where most people go wrong. The people that owned our farm before us had the most awful contraptions of wires running everywhere trying to get their fence to work, but their ground was faulty. All we needed to do was set another ground and replace the old ground clamp on the existing ground and the fence worked, no problem.

                  I better stop or I will scare everyone away. Any other thoughts??

                  I LOVE the coated wire, and we have had everything, including the board-look-alike Centaur fencing (also lovely but expensive), wood, tape, braid, and more. When I had to run a new line, I chose the coated wire because it's safe, easy to see, easy to maintain, lasts well, and WORKS.

                  I highly recommend having electric on it. My horses never get in it or lean through it. I would worry about it if it wasn't hot, especially near a busy road. If I wasn't going to electrify it, I would go with something else, to be perfectly honest.

                  I'm a big fan. I'll see if I can get a picture later today.

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    Awesome responses so far--I really appreciate everyone's input. The goat is kind of a random thing that may, or may not happen. I only have one, invalid horse I would bring home right away (weanling will stay with other mares for now) and I thought maybe I'd get him a goat for a friend for the time being. A goat would have a blast with the weeds on this place (I can't believe I just refi my house and then, FINALLY, found an acreage...ugh)!

                    Back to the fence--I plan to have posts driven if at all possible. I was thinking 5" by 8' round line posts set 12' apart? I helped build a high tensile barbless fence last spring and that's how we did it--no concrete--HUGE corner posts (helps when the BO's husband is a contractor and owns a boom--we just pushed them in right in--so quick and easy--too bad they are so far away from this place!).

                    I am also planning to have the top rail and the second from the bottom, at least, hot. Open to suggestions. I would like to deter any grazing through the fence, roaming big dogs, etc. I think I would do a moveable fence to subdivide (probably horseguard).

                    The house is blue-grayish with white trim and a dark grey roof, ugly, ugly barn (any overhang would have helped a lot) is white walls/roof with minimal blue/grey trim and I think the white fence would look really sharp, but of course somewhere in my head I've always wanted brown (for no painting) or black KY-style. *sigh*

                    I'm struggling with what to do around the backyard (small acreage). Currently the back yard is shaped by the pasture fence (which is two strands of falling-down wire). I have dogs I need to contain, but also need to do something that looks nice--this is the view you are paying for, so to speak, and there is a walkout and a deck above so the view is a biggie.

                    I also thought about wider white tape instead of the ramm-type board around the top. I don't know why, but I keep feeling like aesthetically I need something wider around the top?? Trouble visualizing just the coated wire looking right...
                    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My coated wire is white for high visibility. For looks purposes, I actually like not having a wider thing on the top, as it looks more balanced. I think the coated wire is pretty and neat-looking, plus not too obtrusive. But everyone has their own taste! I like it most because of the safety and easy maintenance.

                      I didn't say above, but my posts are 12 feet apart.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        1. How long have you had it installed, what brand, and do you like it?
                        I used White Lightning by these people: http://www.centaurfencing.com/page0004.html
                        Someone local actually installed it.

                        2. What type of posts did you use (material, demension, depth set) for line posts:
                        Creosote posts and T posts every 12'. I think there is a wood post for every four T posts. And, of course, the corners are wood posts.

                        How wide are your corner brace posts?
                        Ummmm, not sure. Four feet, maybe?

                        3. Did you paint your posts, which color, how often do you need to touch up paint?
                        Not painted.

                        4. Did you pound them in or place them in a dug hole. Concrete or no?
                        Pounded. No concrete.

                        5. How many strands did you do and how far apart did you place them? Did you use any other type of fencing (debating about the "board" look for the top rail).
                        Four strands. No other type.

                        6. How many/which are hot?

                        Two of the four are hot.

                        7. Did you DIY?
                        Oh hell no. Get a pro. If my SO and I had tried this we'd have killed each other.

                        8. Can you get a good charge on this stuff?
                        Yep. Mine keeps a very nice charge.

                        Pics:
                        http://home.hiwaay.net/~thrasher/ima...nce/fence3.jpg

                        http://home.hiwaay.net/~thrasher/ima...nce/fence6.jpg (Ignore that old barb wire. That's left over from the old owners and in outside the fence.)

                        http://home.hiwaay.net/~thrasher/ima...nce/fence7.jpg
                        "Dogs are man's best friend. Cats are man's adorable little serial killer." -- theoatmeal.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          What about coated wire in a wooded line?

                          I'm happy to see this thread today as I was going to start a similar one. One question to add.... What happens when a tree falls on it? Does it snap or just stretch?? I love the thought of a no maintenance fence especially in areas of low pressure like in a wood line adjacent to the pasture. My perimeter fence would be 0 to 10 ft into the trees. Suggestions welcome.

                          Sounds like a plan to not paint the posts though when we did ours we sealed the tops with roof tar which may help them from rotting. The redbrand video suggests setting the posts at the right height instead of cutting the tops when you are done. That keeps the preservative intact.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Perimeter fence for fields (2 to 10 acres) 6 strands; top and bottom hi tensile wire w/ charge; middle 4 coated hi tensile wire. As it is under tension and has a very high breaking strength, it will support a fallen tree, but staples can pull out. Be warned, if you have a tree on the fence, note that when the weight is reduced, at some point the remaining tree will be catapulted by the wire. My neighbor, unbeknownst to me, cut a tree off my fence after a storm and was incredibly lucky he survived. I use horseguard to subdivide fields. When I fence shopped, hi tensile wire was not recommended for small areas.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              1. How long have you had it installed, what brand, and do you like it?

                              We've just had it in since April of this year. I have 6 strands of this topped by a 4.25 rail. I only have three electrified though. It was negligibly more than the plain coated wire of the same brand (HorseRail brand). I love it. Our installer was an idiot, so we're having to go back and redo all of his mistakes, but it would be 100% perfect if we had done it ourselves. We are also on a busy road and I don't fear for a sec that they'll get out. They touched the fence once and never again.

                              2. What type of posts did you use (material, demension, depth set) for line posts:How wide are your corner brace posts?

                              We used black locust posts. They vary in diameter from 4" on a couple to mostly 6" or 7". The corner and brace posts are all a good 10"-12". I can't remember offhand the depth they were set, but it was at least 3'.

                              3. Did you paint your posts, which color, how often do you need to touch up paint?

                              Nope, we were going to, but I decided just to let them weather and I'm glad I did.

                              4. Did you pound them in or place them in a dug hole. Concrete or no?
                              Definitely dug a hole. They were rough cut and not tapered and pounding would have been impossible. Corner and brace posts were concreted.

                              5. How many strands did you do and how far apart did you place them? Did you use any other type of fencing (debating about the "board" look for the top rail).
                              See #1. Love the "board" on the top. I used black hotcote, but the board is great for visibility.

                              6. How many/which are hot?
                              All but the rail can be. Just 3 are now.

                              7. Did you DIY?
                              Paid someone who jacked it all up and have been redoing ourselves. For our next pasture we'll use the same exact thing, but pay someone to set posts and install the fencing ourselves. It is a SNAP. I literally had to redo entire lines of fencing and did it by myself.

                              8. Can you get a good charge on this stuff?

                              Our charger was reading at around 18 kilovolts!!! Now that it's a little icy and we have frozen weeds in places it's 15.2 kv as of today.

                              oh yeah, a pic. The posts are MUCH darker now. It's funny to look at these!
                              http://im1.shutterfly.com/media/47a0...D550/ry%3D400/

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                What happens when a tree falls on it? Does it snap or just stretch??
                                On mine, small to medium sized trees bounce. Sometimes they bounce right back off of it.
                                Haven't had a big tree fall on it.
                                I do know that a 1600+ lb horse at decent speed canter also bounces off of it. (much to her dismay and my amusement at that time)
                                It can also withstand my husband driving the tractor into it. At low speed and I yelled, so not sure how well it would've held up if he kept going. He really needs to learn to look in the direction he's driving and not become so mesmerized by the rake on the back.
                                You jump in the saddle,
                                Hold onto the bridle!
                                Jump in the line!
                                ...Belefonte

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  1. How long have you had it installed, what brand, and do you like it?
                                  Centaur fencing. Been using it for all of our fields for the past few years and yes I love it.

                                  2. What type of posts did you use (material, demension, depth set) for line posts:
                                  Cedar posts. 10ft long, dug to 5ft depth and 6"-8" diameter for regular posts.

                                  How wide are your corner brace posts?
                                  Diameter? 10" diameter posts set at 10 feet apart.

                                  3. Did you paint your posts, which color, how often do you need to touch up paint?
                                  I no longer paint my posts. I learned that one some time ago not to ever touch my posts with paint !

                                  4. Did you pound them in or place them in a dug hole. Concrete or no?
                                  Dug holes and used hardcore sheared stone at the bottom.

                                  5. How many strands did you do and how far apart did you place them? Did you use any other type of fencing (debating about the "board" look for the top rail).
                                  Some fields have 5" vinyl rail on the top with 3 or 4 vinyl wire below. Some fields have 5 strand vinyl wire, the 2 middle ones having capacity to be hot. Some fields have 4 strand vinyl wire with 2 middle strands having capacity to be hot. Some fields have 3 rows of 5" vinyl rail.

                                  6. How many/which are hot?
                                  I advise you do put 2 hot rails in as it discourages the horses to put their heads through. I rarely electrify mine but it's there if I ever need to.

                                  7. Did you DIY?
                                  We are Centaur distributors so yes we're used to installing it.

                                  8. Can you get a good charge on this stuff?
                                  Yes providing you have good earth, but if not then put 2 hot wire next to each other and it will work when the horse touches both of them.

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                                  • #18
                                    Fence undet tension. Wow

                                    Thanks for the warming on the "spring back", gnu. I had no idea.

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                                    • Original Poster

                                      #19
                                      Cloverbarley, those are some serious posts you put in (and deep-wow!). I think my checkbook is crying...oh wait now it is quiet...I think it just died.

                                      So for those of you who didn't paint your posts (and didn't say), did you use the white or the black strands? I can't decide which would be better. I think the visibility of the black in the winter would be better and the visibility of the white in the summer would be better. Since we are about 1/2 and 1/2 *shrug* maybe it doesn't matter.

                                      Also, I was thinking 5 strands, but maybe six would be better. Augh. I hope to have the fence be as close to 5' tall as possible.

                                      Anyone ever use old telephone poles as corner posts? Pros/Cons? I know where I can get them...

                                      Since the neighbors around here fence with barbwire, or a single strand of hot wire, I'm pretty sure anything I do will be an improvement and quite the talk. .
                                      DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/

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                                      • #20
                                        Originally posted by TrotTrotPumpkn View Post
                                        Anyone ever use old telephone poles as corner posts? Pros/Cons? I know where I can get them...
                                        Yes I've used them and they are great. You have to check what they are treated with as some of the older ones have a creosote type substance on them and I won't use those because of the leaching you can get into the water system. Some of the newer ones are pressure treated though and those are the ones I have used. I use them as gate posts too. Because of their diameter they sink into the ground and will not move but you do have to dig them in deep enough so they don't become top-heavy and lean over.

                                        The reason I dug them so deep was because we've replaced so many posts that were only dug to 2-3ft and I found with the extreme weather differences we get here that in the winter some of the posts lifted out of the ground due to the freeze. I also found that when spring came around and the ground started to defrost that the horses were able to push them so they no longer stayed in a straight line. Hence I pulled them all out and started again. The only problem with digging them so deep though is that if/when they are at the end of their life expectancy, or they snap underground if using thinner posts, you will have to dig deep to get them out. For me that is okay as I have an excavator/digger machine.

                                        My posts are overkill really and not necessary for regular fencing. I use them as I have an abundance of them around here and the price is about the same as the thinner ones so makes sense to me to use them. Not all my posts are that thick, some internal fences which are post and board are regular sized (6" diameters).

                                        One thing with the vinyl wire is that you can space your posts wider apart than you would for post and board. Some of my fields with the wire have posts set at 20ft apart, whereas all my post and board posts are set at 6ft. If you use the vinyl rail you won't be able to go much wider than 12ft though as the weight of the rail requires the posts being closer.

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