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Going “Hog Wild” on a barn build

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    #21
    I did not build from scratch but did a pretty substantial renovation when we bought our place a couple of years ago. We started with a barn that had "good bones," - good sized 12 x12 stalls, good ventilation, a nice wide aisle - but that was missing some "must have" features (for me that included dutch doors, so there was always a way to get a horse out of the barn without using the aisle, for example) as well as some aesthetics and comfort related features. For example, the tack/feed room was not fully weather tight nor particularly attractive, and I wanted something nicer.

    I also added mats, fans, a fly system, a solarium in the wash rack and a washer and dryer in what became the feed/utility room. All in all I guess I spent pretty close to the budget you've been quoted and I consider it money very well spent. I love having a barn that is not only functional but attractive and comfortable for both the horses and the humans, and every time I walk into it, I smile. I say spend the money and enjoy it!

    You can find some photos of what we did in the blog I kept while we were in the renovation process: https://hedgerow-farm.com/
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina

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      Original Poster

      #22
      Originally posted by TheJenners View Post
      To the OP, I vote let them do all the work. Subcontracting sorta sucks.

      Sounds legit to me! Thank you!

      Comment

        Original Poster

        #23
        Originally posted by Gamma View Post
        See if you have a large animal rescue group in your area (rescue like my horse is stuck in a pond, not like my horse is too skinny). They will probably be happy to do outreach and talk with you about making your barn safe. Stuff like making it fire truck accessible, etc.

        I went to a seminar once and they convinced me of the importance of outside stall doors.

        That’s a good idea! Outside stall doors are a must for me.






        Comment

          Original Poster

          #24
          Originally posted by Lucassb View Post
          I did not build from scratch but did a pretty substantial renovation when we bought our place a couple of years ago. We started with a barn that had "good bones," - good sized 12 x12 stalls, good ventilation, a nice wide aisle - but that was missing some "must have" features (for me that included dutch doors, so there was always a way to get a horse out of the barn without using the aisle, for example) as well as some aesthetics and comfort related features. For example, the tack/feed room was not fully weather tight nor particularly attractive, and I wanted something nicer.

          I also added mats, fans, a fly system, a solarium in the wash rack and a washer and dryer in what became the feed/utility room. All in all I guess I spent pretty close to the budget you've been quoted and I consider it money very well spent. I love having a barn that is not only functional but attractive and comfortable for both the horses and the humans, and every time I walk into it, I smile. I say spend the money and enjoy it!

          You can find some photos of what we did in the blog I kept while we were in the renovation process: https://hedgerow-farm.com/
          Thanks for sharing! I won’t have a dryer or a solarium, but a hot water heater and a washing machine are in the plans. I’ll have an outdoor wash rack. And fans! Big safe high velocity fans!

          I love your thoughts on enjoying a comfortable and lovely facility! I want that feeling of joy when I’m in the barn. I was thinking I would save a bit of money by doing an unusual and less attractive layout, but axed that idea. I’m gonna be in this facility twice a day every day and look at every time I’m on my deck. Might as well get the pretty version!

          I’ll check your blog out!

          Comment


            #25
            Originally posted by TheJenners View Post
            To the OP, I vote let them do all the work. Subcontracting sorta sucks.

            Especially if you are not a Heavy Duty DIYer.
            Let a general contractor deal with headaches.
            My barn builder was a local established company, recommended by a place I had boarded that had one of their buildings.

            Does your quote include site prep?
            Excavation, putting in a good, level base?
            Adding footing for your aisles?
            Water? Electric?
            16yrs ago, my excavation & base for 36X36 pole barn with attached 60X120 indoor was $10K.
            Done separately from the actual barn/arena construction, by a different contractor.
            That included flooring barn & stalls (2 12X12) with stonedust & sand footing over gravel for the indoor.
            *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
            Steppin' Out 1988-2004
            Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
            Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015

            Comment


              #26
              Originally posted by She's Pure Gold View Post

              I donno, I think $40-60k for a 36x36 barn with the features you mention seems like a steal
              That was my thought too. We priced a new barn that size a couple of years back. Not including the stalls or site work and it was more than that. Heck, Morton was more than twice the lower number.

              OP, if the builders these companies use in your area have a good reputation and you can afford these prices then go for it. Doing your own GC work is hard when you know what you are doing. Even more difficult when you do not know what you are doing.

              Comment


                #27
                Originally posted by lenapesadie View Post

                Wind ratings are a big deal! My boyfriend is also giving a bit of grief, but he’ll settle down

                Do you have slider doors or roll up doors on your aisle? I’m more familiar with wind rated roll up doors and worry that might be a better choice than sliders.

                It would be fantastic if I could get the builder to do the concrete too. I’ll check into that!

                Shopping around is a big deal!

                Best of luck with your fencing and thanks for your thought
                I have the sliding doors. My sales rep said in order to have any damage covered by the warranty they must be locked when shut. Besides the latch on each side there is a pin in the middle. I only pin the inside but there is a pin for the outside too.

                Comment

                  Original Poster

                  #28
                  Originally posted by 2DogsFarm View Post


                  Especially if you are not a Heavy Duty DIYer.
                  Let a general contractor deal with headaches.
                  My barn builder was a local established company, recommended by a place I had boarded that had one of their buildings.

                  Does your quote include site prep?
                  Excavation, putting in a good, level base?
                  Adding footing for your aisles?
                  Water? Electric?
                  16yrs ago, my excavation & base for 36X36 pole barn with attached 60X120 indoor was $10K.
                  Done separately from the actual barn/arena construction, by a different contractor.
                  That included flooring barn & stalls (2 12X12) with stonedust & sand footing over gravel for the indoor.
                  The quote I like the most so far is almost 40k for the shell. No interior work, no concrete, no site prep, no utilities. I have a direct in with a plumber, electrician and excavator. The property is relatively level with natural red clay. And less than two miles from a quarry. So I’m hoping I can get most of these items done for @20k based on the rough estimates I received for site and utility work. An existing power pole and well near the building site are helping with the cost of running utilities. I’m not including driveway costs at this point, so extra for that. Though it’s likely to be inexpensive recycled asphalt.

                  Estimated break down - super rough
                  Clay pad $2500
                  Utilities $2500
                  Concrete $5000 (entire barn)
                  Screenings or similar $2500 (for the overhang)
                  Interior finished (3 stalls and a tack/feed) $5000

                  So that gives me a tiny amount of wiggle. Except for the concrete, I’m only buying materials. I can GC and DIY the others with the help of my construction family.

                  I didn’t think my quote was low (at all) but it seems you and another poster think it sounds like a super good deal. Metal fabrication is a big industry here, maybe that’s helping control costs? Or maybe my location is helping? I’m pretty certain my Dad is going to think the cost is way too high too, but if I wait for him to do it I’ll be making this same post next year (after forking out 12k in board). As is I’ll bet I’m running a hose and using solar lights for a hot minute waiting on him and BIL lol

                  Thanks for your input! Your $10k pad was for your barn and arena right? I’m still waiting on two more quotes so we will see how other companies compare.

                  Comment

                    Original Poster

                    #29
                    Originally posted by trubandloki View Post

                    That was my thought too. We priced a new barn that size a couple of years back. Not including the stalls or site work and it was more than that. Heck, Morton was more than twice the lower number.

                    OP, if the builders these companies use in your area have a good reputation and you can afford these prices then go for it. Doing your own GC work is hard when you know what you are doing. Even more difficult when you do not know what you are doing.
                    The 40k is just the shell, from a big company. I’m still waiting on my Morton quote. I’m relatively close to their Tallahassee office. I’ll prepare myself for triple ouch on their quote

                    Permitting is pretty painless here, especially for a non residence, I wonder if that is figured into costing? I’m on the I10 corridor so maybe between that and the local metal industry? Or maybe this quote is a scam! I’ll be putting my sketch detectors on!

                    Thanks for your help!

                    Comment

                      Original Poster

                      #30
                      Originally posted by Living In The Sticks View Post

                      I have the sliding doors. My sales rep said in order to have any damage covered by the warranty they must be locked when shut. Besides the latch on each side there is a pin in the middle. I only pin the inside but there is a pin for the outside too.
                      Thanks for the additional info!

                      Comment


                        #31
                        I built a 13 stall barn with indoor arena, and I was the GC.
                        Yes, It was a ton of work. And I did make some mistakes, but I absolutely know I saved roughly $35,000.

                        Especially in the lighting department: I did all my own research, ended up finding LED arena lights from the Midwest. They were manufactured here in the United States, and shipped here to Oregon. Total cost was $12,000. The local super good lighting company was going to cost 30K.
                        i know I saved tons more by sleuthing out sources that a contractor would not have taken the time to do.


                        I researched my subcontractors, they were all super great guys. They absolutely helped me with the red tape and the legality of things. I think they enjoyed having somebody respect their opinions and not just ask redundant questions. My barn builder in particular was extremely helpful.

                        All my subs worked for time-plus-materials, except the electrician (who had zero issue with me sourcing all the fixtures somewhere other than his contact), and the earth prep guy (this is a SUPER important component for a success barn: he came out and spent two hours looking the property over with me before I did the drawings for the county)

                        There was so much I didn’t know, and if I had known what I didn’t know I probably wouldn’t of done it. But in the end I’m glad I did. I learned so much, I know every single inch of my barn ecause I designed it down to the Inch, and had to defend it to the county planners.
                        Attached Files

                        Comment


                          #32
                          Pay them. the real issue is finding the 'them' you REALLY trust. and BEST to know what your priorities are. You can build the sweetest barn in the county....but it you didn't allow for good fencing, grading, layout for storage / hay/ and manure management and equipment to go with.....well, you've got the sweetest little barn, and thats it.
                          ayrabz
                          "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
                          --Jimmy Buffett

                          Comment


                            #33
                            Originally posted by Living In The Sticks View Post

                            I have the sliding doors. My sales rep said in order to have any damage covered by the warranty they must be locked when shut. Besides the latch on each side there is a pin in the middle. I only pin the inside but there is a pin for the outside too.
                            We used to have sliding doors, is what was used in barns decades ago.

                            In our very windy country, we ended up walling in the West doors, they kept being blown off.

                            Decades later, we went with overhead doors, opened the West wall again and have great luck with them, other than one door a couple years ago.
                            We had some 101 mph winds and a South facing door blew in.
                            Those winds blew off many doors in all kinds of garages and warehouses, as per the company that made a new one and double reinforced it with wind struts.
                            In decades, that is the only one that had problems, compared with sliding doors, that no matter how tied down, would still blow off regularly.

                            One advantage of overhead doors, they don't get shut down by ice, are easy to open no matter what.
                            With sliding doors, ice storms made them extra challenging.

                            If someone doesn't has a door exposed to extreme winds, any door will be fine.



                            Comment


                              #34
                              I think in your situation paying a builder is exactly the right thing for many of the reasons already explored in the thread. You will have your hands full just answering their questions and making the choices.

                              Focus first on the bones, the things you can never change. That's site prep and grading, size, ventilation, water management, etc. I personally love a building with generous overhangs and good guttering and drainage. You won't regret spending your money on never having mud in the high traffic areas, and it's totally possible to have that.

                              Make sure your quotes include delivery to your location. That can be a huge difference in price across areas.
                              If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket

                              Comment


                                #35
                                Originally posted by Bluey View Post

                                We used to have sliding doors, is what was used in barns decades ago.

                                In our very windy country, we ended up walling in the West doors, they kept being blown off.

                                Decades later, we went with overhead doors, opened the West wall again and have great luck with them, other than one door a couple years ago.
                                We had some 101 mph winds and a South facing door blew in.
                                Those winds blew off many doors in all kinds of garages and warehouses, as per the company that made a new one and double reinforced it with wind struts.
                                In decades, that is the only one that had problems, compared with sliding doors, that no matter how tied down, would still blow off regularly.

                                One advantage of overhead doors, they don't get shut down by ice, are easy to open no matter what.
                                With sliding doors, ice storms made them extra challenging.

                                If someone doesn't has a door exposed to extreme winds, any door will be fine.


                                So far we haven’t had winds more than 50 mph but I’ll keep overhead doors in mind if these become an issue. Thanks for the info.

                                Comment

                                  Original Poster

                                  #36
                                  Originally posted by Arlomine View Post
                                  I built a 13 stall barn with indoor arena, and I was the GC.
                                  Yes, It was a ton of work. And I did make some mistakes, but I absolutely know I saved roughly $35,000.

                                  Especially in the lighting department: I did all my own research, ended up finding LED arena lights from the Midwest. They were manufactured here in the United States, and shipped here to Oregon. Total cost was $12,000. The local super good lighting company was going to cost 30K.
                                  i know I saved tons more by sleuthing out sources that a contractor would not have taken the time to do.


                                  I researched my subcontractors, they were all super great guys. They absolutely helped me with the red tape and the legality of things. I think they enjoyed having somebody respect their opinions and not just ask redundant questions. My barn builder in particular was extremely helpful.

                                  All my subs worked for time-plus-materials, except the electrician (who had zero issue with me sourcing all the fixtures somewhere other than his contact), and the earth prep guy (this is a SUPER important component for a success barn: he came out and spent two hours looking the property over with me before I did the drawings for the county)

                                  There was so much I didn’t know, and if I had known what I didn’t know I probably wouldn’t of done it. But in the end I’m glad I did. I learned so much, I know every single inch of my barn ecause I designed it down to the Inch, and had to defend it to the county planners.
                                  You are the first DIY vote I am looking at a much, much smaller facility of course. I’m confident in my ability to find contractors for utilities and site work. It’s the rest of the stuff that’s making my head hurt!

                                  Thanks for sharing!

                                  Comment

                                    Original Poster

                                    #37
                                    Originally posted by ayrabz View Post
                                    Pay them. the real issue is finding the 'them' you REALLY trust. and BEST to know what your priorities are. You can build the sweetest barn in the county....but it you didn't allow for good fencing, grading, layout for storage / hay/ and manure management and equipment to go with.....well, you've got the sweetest little barn, and thats it.
                                    Well, I’ve got a fair amount of experience keeping horses at home without a barn sooooooo hoping I can figure this out with a barn Property has an existing building I can use for some squares and a carport will do for rounds!

                                    The composting system is a whole different kettle of fish.

                                    Thanks for your help!

                                    Comment

                                      Original Poster

                                      #38
                                      Originally posted by Bluey View Post

                                      We used to have sliding doors, is what was used in barns decades ago.

                                      In our very windy country, we ended up walling in the West doors, they kept being blown off.

                                      Decades later, we went with overhead doors, opened the West wall again and have great luck with them, other than one door a couple years ago.
                                      We had some 101 mph winds and a South facing door blew in.
                                      Those winds blew off many doors in all kinds of garages and warehouses, as per the company that made a new one and double reinforced it with wind struts.
                                      In decades, that is the only one that had problems, compared with sliding doors, that no matter how tied down, would still blow off regularly.

                                      One advantage of overhead doors, they don't get shut down by ice, are easy to open no matter what.
                                      With sliding doors, ice storms made them extra challenging.

                                      If someone doesn't has a door exposed to extreme winds, any door will be fine.


                                      Thanks for chiming in on the doors! The barn site was subjected to 100 mph winds not two weeks ago in Hurricane Sally. I may not be GC material, but I know a bit about wind mitigation. Absolute worst case scenario would be for the south aisle door to fail in hurricane, that could lead to the roof leaving. Truly the only times I would be closing the aisle doors would be in wind storms and maybe while I’m mucking in the winter. The sliders look cute, but I may ask for overhead doors instead. I’ll be investigating this for sure!

                                      I dislike operating sliding doors anyways. I always seem to break them

                                      Comment

                                        Original Poster

                                        #39
                                        Originally posted by poltroon View Post
                                        I think in your situation paying a builder is exactly the right thing for many of the reasons already explored in the thread. You will have your hands full just answering their questions and making the choices.

                                        Focus first on the bones, the things you can never change. That's site prep and grading, size, ventilation, water management, etc. I personally love a building with generous overhangs and good guttering and drainage. You won't regret spending your money on never having mud in the high traffic areas, and it's totally possible to have that.

                                        Make sure your quotes include delivery to your location. That can be a huge difference in price across areas.


                                        Thanks for this sensible advice.
                                        Generous overhang - check (I’ve only got one side for now but I will ask re the cost for both sides)
                                        Gutters - need this. I think a local company might be more cost effective
                                        Ventilation - functional cupola, gable vents, grille dividers, functioning windows (pray its enough)
                                        Size - 33% larger than what I “need” (pray its enough)
                                        Water management and drainage - the north side of the barn is the most vulnerable to run off; making a note to go over this in detail when planning excavation

                                        Delivery- I’ll be double checking this ASAP. I presumed that a materials plus installation quote would include the delivery, but I am going to make absolutely certain before I sign or pay anything

                                        Comment


                                          #40
                                          lenapesadie Yes, my $10K was the base for both barn & (attached) arena.
                                          And that number included the stonedust for stall & aisle flooring & sand (2") for indoor footing.
                                          But bear in mind, this was 16yrs ago.
                                          I'd expect the cost of materials & labor to have increased considerably.

                                          Your point about expecting delivery included in cost is valid.
                                          And in today's changed economy, arranging delivery of materials could end up a logistic nightmare.
                                          I expect your Construction-savvy family may be able to help, but some things could be beyond their control.

                                          *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
                                          Steppin' Out 1988-2004
                                          Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
                                          Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015

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