Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You're responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the Forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it--details of personal disputes may be better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts, though are not legally obligated to do so, regardless of content.

Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting. Moderators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts unless they have been alerted and have determined that a post, thread or user has violated the Forums' policies. Moderators do not regularly independently monitor the Forums for such violations.

Profanity, outright vulgarity, blatant personal insults or otherwise inappropriate statements will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

Users may provide their positive or negative experiences with or opinions of companies, products, individuals, etc.; however, accounts involving allegations of criminal behavior against named individuals or companies MUST be first-hand accounts and may NOT be made anonymously.

If a situation has been reported upon by a reputable news source or addressed by law enforcement or the legal system it is open for discussion, but if an individual wants to make their own claims of criminal behavior against a named party in the course of that discussion, they too must identify themselves by first and last name and the account must be first-person.

Criminal allegations that do not satisfy these requirements, when brought to our attention, may be removed pending satisfaction of these criteria, and we reserve the right to err on the side of caution when making these determinations.

Credible threats of suicide will be reported to the police along with identifying user information at our disposal, in addition to referring the user to suicide helpline resources such as 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it's understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users' profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses -- Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it's related to a horse for sale, regardless of who's selling it, it doesn't belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions -- Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services -- Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products -- While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements -- Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be "bumped" excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues -- Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators' discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the �alert� button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your �Ignore� list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you'd rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user's membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

Dream farm - how long to find and how many did you look at?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #21
    I know two people who purchased their property by writing letters to all the owners in the area they liked and saying"please contact us if you are considering selling". It obviously worked.
    "Good young horses are bred, but good advanced horses are trained" Sam Griffiths

    Comment


      #22
      Originally posted by Bicoastal View Post
      For those who talked to the owners, how? I thought that owners were discouraged from being present and all communication went through agents?
      Just...talk?

      Some owners don't want anything to do with the process and yes, will make you go through their agent. Others care about who their property goes to. FSBO sales mean you HAVE to talk to the owner, unless you want *your* agent doing all the talking. Calling up (or emailing or snail mail) an absent owner of land that's not even for same = talking to the owner.

      Owners don't bite, and if any agent discouraged an owner from being present, they wouldn't be my agent if I was selling, and I wouldn't be buying if I was on that end.
      ______________________________
      The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

      Comment


        #23
        Originally posted by Willesdon View Post
        I know two people who purchased their property by writing letters to all the owners in the area they liked and saying"please contact us if you are considering selling". It obviously worked.
        we get at least three letters a month also I can only cut the front yard on early Sunday mornings otherwise people will stop to ask is your property for sale, do you know of any that are coming the market?

        Admittedly some of the attention is concerning the property next door that is being "renovated" by the current owner (going on ten years now).... problem is he used that property and others as collateral for a business loan, business failed..... so he has done nothing with the property. To this point he has been able to keep the loan payments current and the lender refuses to do a particle lien release to allow him to sell the property, they want all of their money not some

        Comment


          #24
          Originally posted by crosscreeksh View Post
          We are on our fifth "done it all from the ground up" horse farm. We never found the "perfect" place, ready to move into. So we have designed and built each one. One more to go for our retirement!!
          I simply cannot fathom FIVE "from the ground up" builds. Could you take us through your biggest advice and what you've learned? What mistakes did you make early on and learn from? After years of looking for the right property and never finding a place enough off the road, with neighbors far enough away, a house the fit the land, a nice piece of land, some acreage.....we finally gave up and bought a place that required building the horse facilities. I work full time and find this project to be extremely challenging - expensive, time, knowledge and decisions. But, it is the only way to get what you really want - your requirements" list.
          Last edited by PaddockWood; Jun. 13, 2020, 10:37 AM.

          Comment


            #25
            We bought raw land. 45 minutes from home. I worked full time about halfway between the 2, but my horses were boarded minutes from home. DH worked full time, and the majority of the time we were building, he also contracted out of town, so mostly it was just me. Thankfully for a lot of that contracting he worked 4x10, so came home Thursday night, and spend most of Friday on site, and then we did our stuff Sat and some of Sunday before he had to drive (or fly) out again.

            It's definitely something to consider, as building means you need to make your presence known VERY regularly, and preferably not at a reliable time. You'd be AMAZED the crap contractors try to hide from you

            Having made mistakes designing our house, the biggest of which was assuming the company building it was actually competent at designing LIVING spaces, and watching my brother and his wife work through the process of designing their forever home, I would say work with an architect whose houses you have seen, either in person or in lots of pictures. They need to be asking you as many questions are you ask them, otherwise they will never really understand how you LIVE, not just "things" you want. They need to help you design and situate a house to fit the land and your desires, not just one or the other. Don't want June 1 5am sun shining right in your eyes, but would love Dec 1 7:30 am sun lighting your room? Do the windows right.

            Designing equine facilities is no different - find someone who specializes, and asks as many questions as you do. You also really need to know the land - where does water *actually* run - not just where it lands, but where does it travel. Lay out the barn so you get maximum Summer breezes and minimal Winter winds, with minimum Summer sun in stalls, but max Winter warmth.
            ______________________________
            The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

            Comment


              #26
              Don't want June 1 5am sun shining right in your eyes, but would love Dec 1 7:30 am sun lighting your room? Do the windows right.
              our house is aligned east/west....but there is not one window that does not have direct sunlight at one time of the year. Front/back/sides/ends.... all have a period of the year where the sun enters

              As for reviewing photos rather than actual structures, my oldest daughter professionally takes listing photos of properties.... she can make even screwy stuff look inviting (and doing so without computer manipulation), yes photos are better than nothing but use caution

              One of the many things that I would have done differently if doing this all over again would be using a landscape architect, have them do a planting and structures layout ...sure would have added order to the hazardous layout we have

              Comment


                #27
                Originally posted by clanter View Post

                our house is aligned east/west....but there is not one window that does not have direct sunlight at one time of the year. Front/back/sides/ends.... all have a period of the year where the sun enters

                As for reviewing photos rather than actual structures, my oldest daughter professionally takes listing photos of properties.... she can make even screwy stuff look inviting (and doing so without computer manipulation), yes photos are better than nothing but use caution

                One of the many things that I would have done differently if doing this all over again would be using a landscape architect, have them do a planting and structures layout ...sure would have added order to the hazardous layout we have
                I designed my farm house around a focal point, a kiva type fireplace in a corner of the living room.
                Was placed so the winter sun would illuminate it as it was setting.
                Like most farm houses, no one is there after daylight, but most everyone comes in the evenings, early evenings in the winter, to a well deserved rest.
                That was one preferred spot for that, with many windows around it to gaze into the pastures.

                Comment


                  #28
                  That was one preferred spot for that, with many windows around it to gaze into the pastures.
                  we have large floor to ceiling windows that face the pastures/paddocks.... good for checking on the animals, however the negative is that they can see you also as they line up along the fences looking at their watches mumbling about It is Time To Eat WHEN are you coming out to FEED US?

                  Comment


                    #29
                    Originally posted by clanter View Post

                    our house is aligned east/west....but there is not one window that does not have direct sunlight at one time of the year. Front/back/sides/ends.... all have a period of the year where the sun enters
                    When done well, this is a huge bonus! Not a lot of people consider this. Nobody wants your favorite room baking in sun in July.

                    As for reviewing photos rather than actual structures, my oldest daughter professionally takes listing photos of properties.... she can make even screwy stuff look inviting (and doing so without computer manipulation), yes photos are better than nothing but use caution
                    Of course, but if you can't visit the house. This is more about how are things laid out, what does storage look like, rather than how attractive is it.

                    One of the many things that I would have done differently if doing this all over again would be using a landscape architect, have them do a planting and structures layout ...sure would have added order to the hazardous layout we have
                    that is a luxury we would have loved to have done for sure.
                    ______________________________
                    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

                    Comment


                      #30
                      Originally posted by clanter View Post

                      we have large floor to ceiling windows that face the pastures/paddocks.... good for checking on the animals, however the negative is that they can see you also as they line up along the fences looking at their watches mumbling about It is Time To Eat WHEN are you coming out to FEED US?
                      Same here. We don't have curtains because we're out in the country, and the 1890s house has the original arched, tall windows with great moldings so it seemed like a shame to cover those up. But that means the horses watch the windows and even whinny when they see us. LET'S GO, PEOPLE, WE KNOW YOU'RE IN THERE."

                      Comment


                        #31
                        My husband and I bought our property in 2001. We had boarded horses for a few years, and had experienced pretty typical boarding barn issues - some care related, some people related. It took 6-8 months to find the right place, and we looked at a number that were less than accurately described. When we found it, things just seemed to come together. Be patient. Also be realistic about what changes/improvements the property needs. Very few properties are "perfect". We looked for "workable", with the expectation of making some improvements over time.

                        Comment


                          #32
                          Originally posted by clanter View Post

                          we have large floor to ceiling windows that face the pastures/paddocks.... good for checking on the animals, however the negative is that they can see you also as they line up along the fences looking at their watches mumbling about It is Time To Eat WHEN are you coming out to FEED US?
                          We placed the sand pile right across the windows and can watch the horses taking naps.
                          Horses watch TV in the evenings.

                          Comment


                            #33
                            We had two days to shop because we were moving halfway across the country. My DH’s new job is near the state line, so we looked at 6 properties each day, one day in each state. Day 2 farm 3 was The One and we were pretty much sold walking on the property.

                            that said, the horse facilities were minimal at the time. I have since replaced all the fencing, built new paddocks, built an indoor and additional 5 stall barn, and much more. No property is perfect....I just had a vision of what could be that I was completely satisfied with.

                            Comment


                              #34
                              Originally posted by fordtraktor View Post
                              .... No property is perfect....I just had a vision of what could be that I was completely satisfied with.
                              So, so true. You have to have a lot of imagination. The land is pretty much the most important part-- you can fix / replace structures. (Yes you have to budget for this.)
                              The attached pic shows the main barn on our property when we first bought the place. It was a mess, with 3-4ft of manure piled inside, and a 10ft tall pile of loose hay in the center hall.
                              But I could just picture what it could be like. With a lot of labor, it's now beautiful and functional. Did most of it ourselves-- got a contractor to fix the foundation and replace the siding, and make the sliding doors, but everything else was DIY so it wasn't actually very expensive. Way cheaper than knocking it down and putting up a new polebuilding of that size.
                              Click image for larger version

Name:	barn b4 after.JPG
Views:	364
Size:	24.1 KB
ID:	10667160

                              Comment


                                #35
                                Originally posted by HungarianHippo View Post

                                So, so true. You have to have a lot of imagination. The land is pretty much the most important part-- you can fix / replace structures. (Yes you have to budget for this.)
                                The attached pic shows the main barn on our property when we first bought the place. It was a mess, with 3-4ft of manure piled inside, and a 10ft tall pile of loose hay in the center hall.
                                But I could just picture what it could be like. With a lot of labor, it's now beautiful and functional. Did most of it ourselves-- got a contractor to fix the foundation and replace the siding, and make the sliding doors, but everything else was DIY so it wasn't actually very expensive.
                                Absolutely gorgeous! I love it.

                                My property had an overgrown, poorly installed outdoor arena with slippery footing, dangerous fencing, and tons of basic barn issues. I rehabbed it for 9 years as I worked and saved to build something that works in this northern Indiana climate. Eventually I was able to build the barn in the attached pictures. And now, with my small boarding operation, it pays enough to keep me and my 2 horses in full time dressage training with a trainer I absolutely love, as long as I do the work. It's a lot of work, and I have a family and a busy job as an attorney, but somehow I make it all happen! well, mostly. I wish I had gotten the grass cut today before rain hit, but I was on conference calls for work -- so it is what it is!

                                Comment


                                  #36
                                  I looked off and on for a few years. I got serious when the boarding stable owner told me she was going to sell. Then I put my house on the market, it sold in five days, and I had a week to get another place under contract. This was in 2006. I looked at about six places without finding one I liked or could afford to fix up. The place I ended up buying had just been listed that day. We drove over, and since the listing agent didn't return our phone calls we just knocked on the door and talked to the sellers. They let us in, and I made a full price offer an hour later. A sign never even went up, so when their moving truck appeared there were apparently a lot of surprised neighbors.

                                  The house was just okay, but had a good floor plan. I had the old and rickety barn removed and a modular barn put in its place. Redid the fencing. I moved my horses in about six months after I moved in, when I had things ready for them. I've totally remodeled the house in the time I've been here, but more to make it my taste than because what was here was horrible. I wish I had more land, but in reality my place is pretty perfect for me since I am a widow and do everything by myself (I do have a handyman for bigger projects).

                                  Comment


                                    #37
                                    We looked for almost three years before we found our property. We made probably 5 offers that failed for various reasons during that time. The listing for the property we finally bought was posted at lunchtime (I was checking listings multiple times a day by that point), I told our real estate agent about it and we got to see it by 4 pm that afternoon, and filled out the offer and presented it in the owner's driveway before we left. We got verrrrrry lucky - the owner was an elderly lady extremely emotionally invested in her property and my husband and I just clicked/resonated with her.

                                    All that said, it was not the perfect horse property right out of the gate. It is a working 22 acre hay farm with the mix of fields/wooded that we were looking for, with a 3/4 acre spring fed pond, the farmhouse is large and has great bones but is in some disrepair, the existing barn is good for storage/workshop space but not for animals. Two years later, we are still renovating the house, and site planning for the animal barn, an outdoor arena and garage. My horses are still boarded elsewhere.

                                    This is in the tri-state NE region. Recently (since COVID), we have had more than few people tell us our property is like gold now - our market is experiencing very heavy interest from city-dwellers looking for bigger country properties and there is absolutely nothing available. I consider us very lucky to have found this place when we did!

                                    Comment


                                      #38
                                      Originally posted by HungarianHippo View Post

                                      Same here. We don't have curtains because we're out in the country, and the 1890s house has the original arched, tall windows with great moldings so it seemed like a shame to cover those up. But that means the horses watch the windows and even whinny when they see us. LET'S GO, PEOPLE, WE KNOW YOU'RE IN THERE."
                                      You need that one way glass that they use for police lineups! Then the horses won't know you are home.

                                      Comment


                                        #39
                                        It took us over a year to find a property. One rejected offer, thank god they did! The house we have is perfect. It wasn't when we bought it, there were no horse facilities but the entire back is fenced. House was a foreclosure and needed work but we knew we could do it. Ended up having to put in an offer even though current house was not sold. Scary as heck but our house sold in a day. Then we had to outbid the competition, luckily we outbid them by 1,000 over asking and it was done. We built the barn and arena but I don't regret any of it. For us it was hard, two people do not need a 4,000 sq foot house. And most places were that large. So our small house with lots of outside room has turned out for the best. Good luck!

                                        Comment


                                          #40
                                          Originally posted by BAC View Post

                                          You need that one way glass that they use for police lineups! Then the horses won't know you are home.
                                          problem becomes horses can detect sounds as far as 2.5 Miles.... and they can hear when you turn on the coffee maker so they know you are awake

                                          https://www.horseandhound.co.uk/feat...es-ears-482458

                                          Comment

                                          Working...
                                          X