Sport Horse Spotlight

C-Quito1

Real Estate Spotlight

THC_1

Sale Spotlight

COTH_without Subscribe
  • Welcome to the Chronicle Forums.
    Please complete your profile. The forums and the rest of www.chronofhorse.com has single sign-in, so your log in information for one will automatically work for the other. Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are the views of the individual and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of The Chronicle of the Horse.

Announcement

Collapse

Forum rules and no-advertising policy

As a participant on this forum, it is your responsibility to know and follow our rules. Please read this message in its entirety.

Board Rules

1. You�re responsible for what you say.
As outlined in Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, The Chronicle of the Horse and its affiliates, as well Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd., the developers of vBulletin, are not legally responsible for statements made in the Forums.

This is a public forum viewed by a wide spectrum of people, so please be mindful of what you say and who might be reading it�details of personal disputes may be better handled privately. While posters are legally responsible for their statements, the moderators may in their discretion remove or edit posts, though are not legally obligated to do so, regardless of content.

Users have the ability to modify or delete their own messages after posting. Moderators generally will not delete posts, threads or accounts unless they have been alerted and have determined that a post, thread or user has violated the Forums� policies. Moderators do not regularly independently monitor the Forums for such violations.

Profanity, outright vulgarity, blatant personal insults or otherwise inappropriate statements will not be tolerated and will be dealt with at the discretion of the moderators.

Users may provide their positive or negative experiences with or opinions of companies, products, individuals, etc.; however, accounts involving allegations of criminal behavior against named individuals or companies MUST be first-hand accounts and may NOT be made anonymously.

If a situation has been reported upon by a reputable news source or addressed by law enforcement or the legal system it is open for discussion, but if an individual wants to make their own claims of criminal behavior against a named party in the course of that discussion, they too must identify themselves by first and last name and the account must be first-person.

Criminal allegations that do not satisfy these requirements, when brought to our attention, may be removed pending satisfaction of these criteria, and we reserve the right to err on the side of caution when making these determinations.

Credible threats of suicide will be reported to the police along with identifying user information at our disposal, in addition to referring the user to suicide helpline resources such as 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK.

2. Conversations in horse-related forums should be horse-related.
The forums are a wonderful source of information and support for members of the horse community. While it�s understandably tempting to share information or search for input on other topics upon which members might have a similar level of knowledge, members must maintain the focus on horses.

3. Keep conversations productive, on topic and civil.
Discussion and disagreement are inevitable and encouraged; personal insults, diatribes and sniping comments are unproductive and unacceptable. Whether a subject is light-hearted or serious, keep posts focused on the current topic and of general interest to other participants of that thread. Utilize the private message feature or personal email where appropriate to address side topics or personal issues not related to the topic at large.

4. No advertising in the discussion forums.
Posts in the discussion forums directly or indirectly advertising horses, jobs, items or services for sale or wanted will be removed at the discretion of the moderators. Use of the private messaging feature or email addresses obtained through users� profiles for unsolicited advertising is not permitted.

Company representatives may participate in discussions and answer questions about their products or services, or suggest their products on recent threads if they fulfill the criteria of a query. False "testimonials" provided by company affiliates posing as general consumers are not appropriate, and self-promotion of sales, ad campaigns, etc. through the discussion forums is not allowed.

Paid advertising is available on our classifieds site and through the purchase of banner ads. The tightly monitored Giveaways forum permits free listings of genuinely free horses and items available or wanted (on a limited basis). Items offered for trade are not allowed.

Advertising Policy Specifics
When in doubt of whether something you want to post constitutes advertising, please contact a moderator privately in advance for further clarification. Refer to the following points for general guidelines:

Horses � Only general discussion about the buying, leasing, selling and pricing of horses is permitted. If the post contains, or links to, the type of specific information typically found in a sales or wanted ad, and it�s related to a horse for sale, regardless of who�s selling it, it doesn�t belong in the discussion forums.

Stallions � Board members may ask for suggestions on breeding stallion recommendations. Stallion owners may reply to such queries by suggesting their own stallions, only if their horse fits the specific criteria of the original poster. Excessive promotion of a stallion by its owner or related parties is not permitted and will be addressed at the discretion of the moderators.

Services � Members may use the forums to ask for general recommendations of trainers, barns, shippers, farriers, etc., and other members may answer those requests by suggesting themselves or their company, if their services fulfill the specific criteria of the original post. Members may not solicit other members for business if it is not in response to a direct, genuine query.

Products � While members may ask for general opinions and suggestions on equipment, trailers, trucks, etc., they may not list the specific attributes for which they are in the market, as such posts serve as wanted ads.

Event Announcements � Members may post one notification of an upcoming event that may be of interest to fellow members, if the original poster does not benefit financially from the event. Such threads may not be �bumped� excessively. Premium members may post their own notices in the Event Announcements forum.

Charities/Rescues � Announcements for charitable or fundraising events can only be made for 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations. Special exceptions may be made, at the moderators� discretion and direction, for board-related events or fundraising activities in extraordinary circumstances.

Occasional posts regarding horses available for adoption through IRS-registered horse rescue or placement programs are permitted in the appropriate forums, but these threads may be limited at the discretion of the moderators. Individuals may not advertise or make announcements for horses in need of rescue, placement or adoption unless the horse is available through a recognized rescue or placement agency or government-run entity or the thread fits the criteria for and is located in the Giveaways forum.

5. Do not post copyrighted photographs unless you have purchased that photo and have permission to do so.

6. Respect other members.
As members are often passionate about their beliefs and intentions can easily be misinterpreted in this type of environment, try to explore or resolve the inevitable disagreements that arise in the course of threads calmly and rationally.

If you see a post that you feel violates the rules of the board, please click the �alert� button (exclamation point inside of a triangle) in the bottom left corner of the post, which will alert ONLY the moderators to the post in question. They will then take whatever action, or no action, as deemed appropriate for the situation at their discretion. Do not air grievances regarding other posters or the moderators in the discussion forums.

Please be advised that adding another user to your �Ignore� list via your User Control Panel can be a useful tactic, which blocks posts and private messages by members whose commentary you�d rather avoid reading.

7. We have the right to reproduce statements made in the forums.
The Chronicle of the Horse may copy, quote, link to or otherwise reproduce posts, or portions of posts, in print or online for advertising or editorial purposes, if attributed to their original authors, and by posting in this forum, you hereby grant to The Chronicle of the Horse a perpetual, non-exclusive license under copyright and other rights, to do so.

8. We reserve the right to enforce and amend the rules.
The moderators may delete, edit, move or close any post or thread at any time, or refrain from doing any of the foregoing, in their discretion, and may suspend or revoke a user�s membership privileges at any time to maintain adherence to the rules and the general spirit of the forum. These rules may be amended at any time to address the current needs of the board.

Please see our full Terms of Service and Privacy Policy for more information.

Thanks for being a part of the COTH forums!

(Revised 5/9/18)
See more
See less

Group Stalls?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Holly Ridge Farm
    started a topic Group Stalls?

    Group Stalls?

    We're building our barn as a run-in style. It will have a !0' x 48' overhanging roofline, and currently opening into three 12 x 12 stalls. We're thinking about changing our plans to make the stalls into one 12 x 12 (for times when one horse may need to be isolated ) and the other into a 12 x 24...or possibly one big community stall - 12 x 36. We're also looking into possibly making the dividing walls between the stall into hinged walls that could be used either opened OR closed to give us all options. The stall (s) would still have 3 dutch doors open all the time out to the overhanging roof and dry lot beyond. I've read that a number of equine facilities in Europe are converting to community stalls based on research showing the positive calming effect group housing has on horses. Thoughts from the forum gurus? Pros/cons?

  • Red Barn
    replied
    Here's an interesting 2017 article addressing this very point:

    https://equusmagazine.com/blog-equus...roommate-27816



    Not sure I'd actually do it, but it's definitely thought provoking.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bluey
    replied
    Originally posted by S1969 View Post
    I would not do this instead of stalls. I might do it in addition to stalls.

    Any time you want to interact with horses directly, it is easier when they are separated -- feeding, grooming, tacking, vet, farrier, isolating for observation, injury, blanketing, medicating.....the list goes on and on.

    I have stalls that open to the paddock with Dutch doors and to the barn aisle with sliding doors on the other side. They are only solid on the bottom half, so horses are "together" all day when they stand in them, but are fully separated every night for feeding.

    It would totally stink if they were in one communal stall for feeding; it would definitely be a fight for resources, and my most needy mare would always get bullied off her food unless I tied them or used feed bags.

    Not to mention all the other things I listed above.
    One advantage for horses to living as domestic animals is that they have consistent resources provided to them and peace to enjoy them.
    Most horses adjust to most conditions, but some are sure nice, one is having their own safe, comfortable individual little corner of the world and it's resources all to themselves, at least for part of the time.

    The more options we have to manage our horses, the happier we can manage them.
    Stalls and individual pens can be part of that.

    Leave a comment:


  • S1969
    replied
    I would not do this instead of stalls. I might do it in addition to stalls.

    Any time you want to interact with horses directly, it is easier when they are separated -- feeding, grooming, tacking, vet, farrier, isolating for observation, injury, blanketing, medicating.....the list goes on and on.

    I have stalls that open to the paddock with Dutch doors and to the barn aisle with sliding doors on the other side. They are only solid on the bottom half, so horses are "together" all day when they stand in them, but are fully separated every night for feeding.

    It would totally stink if they were in one communal stall for feeding; it would definitely be a fight for resources, and my most needy mare would always get bullied off her food unless I tied them or used feed bags.

    Not to mention all the other things I listed above.

    Leave a comment:


  • ElementFarm
    replied
    Originally posted by Holly Ridge Farm View Post
    Yes! We're very excited! We cleared the heavily forested property -12 acres - to give us an open area around the house and barn while leaving as many of the bigger Loblolly Pines and hardwoods for shade around the pastures...yet still allowing for plenty of open grazing. When the horses arrive tonite it will be a shocker from the 20 degrees in MN! I'm pretty sure I'll have some body clipping to do once we start riding! I know summers will seem really hot - but its gorgeous right now!
    Since we apparently live in the same area now, some advice:
    -Yes, shade is important, but your overhang should suffice perfectly for that. If you don't already have sealed-motor fans in the stalls or even in the overhang, that might be a good winter project--you'll want them this summer. We have them in every stall and in the run-ins.

    - Since you just cleared the land, your pasture isn't well established, and with our sandy soil, new grass is fragile. I recommend planting winter rye (annual) if you haven't already. That will give the sandy soil some structure. Also, round bales (if you're willing to feed Bermuda, or maybe fescue) are great to give the horses something eat all winter without destroying the pasture. For small bales, be prepared for sticker shock. Unless you're willing to feed Bermuda, hay prices will be double or triple what you paid in the Midwest.

    Congrats, and welcome to the area. If you haven't already, join the Sandhills Area Equestrians and Sandhills Equestrians FB pages.
    I'm currently deployed to AFG, but can't wait to get home next month and eat at Betsy's crepes. if you want a trail riding buddy send me a PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Trimming
    replied
    Congrats on the new place! I hope everyone loves it.

    In case it helps someone, here's how mine is set up:

    I have a 20x24 pole building. 10x16 is a tack/feed/hay room. Next to that is an 8x10 stall with an 8 foot sliding stall door that opens to the 10x24 run in section. The run-in section has two openings on opposite sides. Let me see if I can add a picture, not to scale, but it gives you the idea. I only have mini/pony sized things and have no intentions of getting anything bigger than 13hh. If something over 13hh was in the plans, the dimensions would be much larger.

    The majority of time the three boys hang out in the 10x24 section with their hay nets. The stall door is only normally closed if I have the youngest in to eat separately. Otherwise, it's open to the run-in section. I've found all three of them in in there at night together, the youngest laying down and the other two standing next to him.
    Last edited by Trimming; Oct. 30, 2019, 12:15 AM. Reason: Can't add photo, get an invalid file error. Will keep trying.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mouse&Bay
    replied
    You might find the John Madden retirement stables to be interesting to view. Neat video here:

    https://youtu.be/jhePxaadJHk

    Very much a group setting for them all.

    Leave a comment:


  • 4LeafCloverFarm
    replied
    And we require pictures, you know....

    Leave a comment:


  • Holly Ridge Farm
    replied
    Yes! We're very excited! We cleared the heavily forested property -12 acres - to give us an open area around the house and barn while leaving as many of the bigger Loblolly Pines and hardwoods for shade around the pastures...yet still allowing for plenty of open grazing. When the horses arrive tonite it will be a shocker from the 20 degrees in MN! I'm pretty sure I'll have some body clipping to do once we start riding! I know summers will seem really hot - but its gorgeous right now!

    Leave a comment:


  • 4LeafCloverFarm
    replied
    Great update. Congrats on your new place!

    Leave a comment:


  • Guilherme
    replied
    Originally posted by Holly Ridge Farm View Post
    I really appreciate all the thoughts offered. On rereading my original post, I should have clarified; we have 3 horses -geldings, 16.2hh-30 yrs, 16.2hh-17 yrs and 17.2hh-5 yrs. All are pretty lo-key and accustom to living together albeit in a 10 acre pasture in a herd of 10. When I originally posted last month we were living in Minnesota and horses were at a boarding facility. My question related to our upcoming plan for moving and building our own place in the North Carolina Sandhills. We've now moved and thanks to your COTH input, we'd revised our plan: the 3 horses will be on pasture 24/7, with 3 rotational pastures that each have access to the main sacrifice lot surrounding barn. The barn has a 10' x 48' "run-in"overhang leading in to three 12x12 enclosed stalls (one with a removable center wall (allowing it to be 12x24 if needed) the stalls have dutch doors but will be left open for access "by choice" to escape heat of the day or severe weather, but closable as needed.We've just arrived last Monday, horses are in transport due to arrive tomorrow. Fencing, waterers, hay racks etc all set ready and anxiously waiting! Thanks for the combined wisdom!
    You're welcome!!!

    It sounds like you have a good program. The one thing you will learn you need more in SC than you did in MN is some shade for horses on a summer days. It need not be very sophisticated. A nice stand of trees will do quite well. If you don't have that then you can get "shade panels" from FarmTec that can be mounted on polls to provide shade. You know iive where heat, not cold, is the enemy!!!

    Good luck in your new location.

    G.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lucassb
    replied
    Originally posted by Bluey View Post
    After spending a lifetime managing horses in herds of all sizes, in pastures and pens of all sizes, we even kept our stallion out with the geldings and he was middle of the pack and minded the boss very well, I now think that all along we were trying to fit a square peg in a round hole.
    Even if we had horse pastures miles long, some times horses just could not get away when one wanted to hurt another.

    Few really have the arrangement and large enough space for horses to get away from each other when they have differences and those happen so easily, even between the best friends.

    I have seen horses be very ugly to each other, intending to and doing grave harm.
    Luckily not any of the assaults or fights I saw with our horses did serious harm but one, a broken front leg right below the elbow.
    Some other pasture accidents we did wonder if those happened when a horse was trying to get away from another chasing him.

    Yes, horses are horses and they will have their differences and not that often, so we keep taking chances.

    By now, I am much less apt to take those chances and finding out that mature and older/old horses don't necessarily need to be where they can get to each other, that just having horses around is good enough to be happy.

    The bossy horse can relax if he can't spend all day managing his herd and the ones below a top horse are happy not to have to watch their back and be second to any resources, water, food and their humans to those horses above them.

    Much less stress for everyone.

    One clear advantage of horses in larger groups is that it takes much less fencing to have more horses in one place than more places for less horses per space.
    Those spaces to move around will be larger the more horses we can run together in one, compared with cutting that space down to smaller spaces.
    Also horses in herds tend to move around more naturally as the herd shuffles around, even a herd of two.

    I think those are management decisions every one has to make for their own horses and one size doesn't fit all.
    When some insist today horses need to live in herds with others or horses are not cared for properly, as some are saying today, well, the response is, "no, not really, it depends on the horses and situation".

    I would build for flexibility and not get hung on one or another kind of management, but understand that how we arrange our horse spaces may change according to whatever horses we have at any one time.

    Let's not keep trying to fit square pegs on round holes, as we have done for long time now when it comes to keeping horses happy, ignoring what horses are telling us because we think they have to like living in our idea of what a horse herd environment is supposed to be.
    This is very well said.

    I have a 14 x 36' run in shed that is set up with one 14 x 12' "stall" that has full gates across the front and back and one 14' x 24' space that is open on the front. The whole thing opens up into a nice decent sized paddock.

    I thought this would be a great set up to use in summer when (I thought) the horses might prefer to be out at night instead of in their regular stalls in my center aisle barn.

    Even with just 2 horses out there, this set up ended up with horses getting "into it" with each other too frequently for me to feel comfortable using it and I abandoned the idea - and this is basically a closed herd of horses that know each other well and one would think, have an established hierarchy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Holly Ridge Farm
    replied
    I really appreciate all the thoughts offered. On rereading my original post, I should have clarified; we have 3 horses -geldings, 16.2hh-30 yrs, 16.2hh-17 yrs and 17.2hh-5 yrs. All are pretty lo-key and accustom to living together albeit in a 10 acre pasture in a herd of 10. When I originally posted last month we were living in Minnesota and horses were at a boarding facility. My question related to our upcoming plan for moving and building our own place in the North Carolina Sandhills. We've now moved and thanks to your COTH input, we'd revised our plan: the 3 horses will be on pasture 24/7, with 3 rotational pastures that each have access to the main sacrifice lot surrounding barn. The barn has a 10' x 48' "run-in"overhang leading in to three 12x12 enclosed stalls (one with a removable center wall (allowing it to be 12x24 if needed) the stalls have dutch doors but will be left open for access "by choice" to escape heat of the day or severe weather, but closable as needed.We've just arrived last Monday, horses are in transport due to arrive tomorrow. Fencing, waterers, hay racks etc all set ready and anxiously waiting! Thanks for the combined wisdom!

    Leave a comment:


  • Scribbler
    replied
    Originally posted by clanter View Post

    that was my thought also, I guess Group Stall is the new in thing for some, run in shed was want we referred to such as. These are "Group Stalls" for all but the lowest in the herd who gets to stand outside viewing in wondering what it is like to be under cover
    I wonder if it's just a question of things getting different names in different cultures.

    In North America particularly rural areas or prvately owned acreage, the big pasture with a run-in shed or shelter is a very common, efficient, cost effective and horse friendly way to keep most horses, especially recreational horses, young stock and retired horses.

    In suburbs or if you need access to a big training barn with indoor arena etc you have to board at s barn with limited turnout usually. But my feeling is almost everyone knows pasture and a run in is healthiest even if they don't want to keep their $100,000 elite show horse in that situation.

    The group stall term is coming it seems as a translation from Europe where perhaps with less space horses have tended to be kept in barns more? But honestly importing this concept back to North America especially the West or any more rural area is just reinventing the wheel.

    OP if you think about run in shelter rather than "group stalls" there is so much advice out there including depth siting drainage and prefab options like car ports.

    Leave a comment:


  • clanter
    replied
    Originally posted by Guilherme View Post
    Any sort of structure, of any number of sides, that is open so that the horses may come or go as they wish is not a stall. Call that what you wish, but the phrase "run in" is pretty common.


    G.
    that was my thought also, I guess Group Stall is the new in thing for some, run in shed was want we referred to such as. These are "Group Stalls" for all but the lowest in the herd who gets to stand outside viewing in wondering what it is like to be under cover

    Leave a comment:


  • Guilherme
    replied
    To make sure we're all on the same page we should define "stall" as a small to medium enclosure with four sides and a closed entry. It's an area where the horse(s) in it do not have the ability to either effectively distance themselves from each other or leave the enclosure.

    Any sort of structure, of any number of sides, that is open so that the horses may come or go as they wish is not a stall. Call that what you wish, but the phrase "run in" is pretty common.

    When threatened the horse's first instinct is to flee. Corner them and one of two things will happen: they will either fight or the less aggressive horse will quit. What it will be will depend on the temperaments of the horses involved. No matter what those may be a horse is going to get injured, maybe seriously and maybe even fatally. The only winner in the fight is going to be vet. who has to take care of the damage. Take the ability to escape away from a horse and you create a new set of problems with really multiple, possible outcomes. The, "well, it's never happened to me" answer is valid as far as it goes. A fair way to amend the statement is to add the word "yet" at the end.

    G.

    Leave a comment:


  • Palm Beach
    replied
    Originally posted by Holly Ridge Farm View Post
    We're building our barn as a run-in style. It will have a !0' x 48' overhanging roofline, and currently opening into three 12 x 12 stalls. We're thinking about changing our plans to make the stalls into one 12 x 12 (for times when one horse may need to be isolated ) and the other into a 12 x 24...or possibly one big community stall - 12 x 36. We're also looking into possibly making the dividing walls between the stall into hinged walls that could be used either opened OR closed to give us all options. The stall (s) would still have 3 dutch doors open all the time out to the overhanging roof and dry lot beyond. I've read that a number of equine facilities in Europe are converting to community stalls based on research showing the positive calming effect group housing has on horses. Thoughts from the forum gurus? Pros/cons?
    Can you leave it one big stall with the option of closing one section off with panels? I'm not familiar with Minnesota winter, but in the Mid Atlantic area, it never get so cold that horses need to be housed. Mine are out all winter. I would only bring them in if the ground was ice.

    Leave a comment:


  • spacytracy
    replied
    I have three harmonious ponies that we are building a barn for. I thought about run ins instead of stalls, for the ease of them going in and out at will, healthier for the horses, etc. However, I was thinking of today and not the future. What if I get a new horse that's not as friendly with others? What if I need to quarantine someone? What if they end up fighting for food?
    In the end, for us, stalls leading to a covered dry lot was the better option for us.
    Horses get along great in those situations in most cases, but one bossy one can really mess up the entire situation.

    Leave a comment:


  • walkinthewalk
    replied
    Originally posted by Scribbler View Post
    Horses do well in herds but not so well when they can trap each other against fences or corners. Even horses who like each other can get in dangerous kick to the death fights if one can't escape the other.

    House them together but with open ended shelters with nowhere to get stuck.
    ^^^^^THIS! I had it happen once, with my own. There was only four of them --- they had been together for many years.

    I almost lost the horse that got hurt.



    Leave a comment:


  • Hulk
    replied
    I have been doing it for over 30 years with no problems. The horses seem to like it. I have what seems to be a very relaxed herd. The key I think is that there is plenty of room, and plenty of food and water. There are 2 large doors. And one entire side is a hay manger. The herd also has 2 large open fields full of grass. So no resource guarding. In the winter I put round bails outside and keep the manger full inside.

    I also have box stalls for individual needs for the horses. But for pasture time its real nice to not have to worry if a bad storm comes out of no where that the herd can get in out of it. So basically I guess it is like a huge run in shelter.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X