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Getting rid of wasps?

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  • Getting rid of wasps?

    The new farm has been vacant for over a year now and has quite the collection of small wasps nests everywhere. We also really angered a nest of ground bees while mowing. Any ideas on how to get rid of these without getting stung (again)?

  • #2
    Hairspray and a lighter?

    Just kidding, sort of. Inside small buildings I like Raid fumigators. Outside we use those wasp and hornet sprays that spray for like 15 feet.

    Comment


    • #3
      yup- the wasp hornet spray - but make sure you do it at dusk- that's when they are all in their nest. If you do it at other times, they just relocate. I had wasps build a nest in my grill last year- and I am very allergic.

      Be careful. I'd get an epipen- or atleast have benadryl on hand. Anyone else see the Axmen episode where the guy got stung by wasps in a tree and started rocking all over like he was going to pass out. YIKES

      Comment


      • #4
        I use the wasp spray, and make sure I get the straglers that land on the nest right after I zap it, and if I can I knock down the nest (a lot of times if you really soak it the nest will fall by itself) so I don't assume it's another nest. They seem to build in the same places so keep your eyes on the most popular spots-and check them every day if possible.
        You can't fix stupid-Ron White

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        • #5
          Spend a day walking around the property and making note of where each and every nest is.
          Wait until a little while after dark and grab a bunch of cans of the foaming wasp & hornet killer. The foaming kid works best since it takes less to coat a nest and it sticks around to finish the job without all dripping off immediately. Also the foaming kind kills yellow jackets too and those aren't always killed off by the streaming liquid kind.
          Go around after dark (with a flashlight if necessary) and coat each and every nest with foam. After it's dark out for a while the wasps are all home inside the nest, so you won't miss any. They also won't start swarming out when you spray the nests.
          It also works on ground nests...there's a small straw attached to the side of the can for getting into tight spots. Attach that to the sprayer and foam down the hole for the ground nest. Then lay a board over the top, a decent sized piece of plywood works well. This covers any escape holes they might have made that you can't find to spray.

          Hate those things...I have some stupid yellow jackets that moved into an outside window sill/casement and I only had the streaming liquid spray at home. Hit that nest hard after dark, next day half the suckers were still alive because the spray didn't spread and foam inside the siding. Tonight they get hit with foaming spray...they've taken over my hummingbird feeders going after the sugar water in them and won't let the hummingbirds anywhere near them.
          You jump in the saddle,
          Hold onto the bridle!
          Jump in the line!
          ...Belefonte

          Comment


          • #6
            Excellent Information ~ thank you ~

            Originally posted by MistyBlue View Post
            Spend a day walking around the property and making note of where each and every nest is.
            Wait until a little while after dark and grab a bunch of cans of the foaming wasp & hornet killer. The foaming kid works best since it takes less to coat a nest and it sticks around to finish the job without all dripping off immediately. Also the foaming kind kills yellow jackets too and those aren't always killed off by the streaming liquid kind.
            Go around after dark (with a flashlight if necessary) and coat each and every nest with foam. After it's dark out for a while the wasps are all home inside the nest, so you won't miss any. They also won't start swarming out when you spray the nests.
            It also works on ground nests...there's a small straw attached to the side of the can for getting into tight spots. Attach that to the sprayer and foam down the hole for the ground nest. Then lay a board over the top, a decent sized piece of plywood works well. This covers any escape holes they might have made that you can't find to spray.

            Hate those things...I have some stupid yellow jackets that moved into an outside window sill/casement and I only had the streaming liquid spray at home. Hit that nest hard after dark, next day half the suckers were still alive because the spray didn't spread and foam inside the siding. Tonight they get hit with foaming spray...they've taken over my hummingbird feeders going after the sugar water in them and won't let the hummingbirds anywhere near them.
            Thank you once again MistyBlue for this great information ~ I really do think you should be a consultant and get paid $$$ for all your horse and horse property related information ~~~ you not only know "how to" but the very best ways "to do it"
            Zu Zu Bailey " IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE ! "

            Comment


            • #7
              Why?

              Yes, Ground Bees/Yellow Jackets are aggressive, attack and cause a problem, but wasps?
              I don't allow ours to be sprayed or distroyed. They are actually not aggressive at all. Once I was replacing a hose hangar while talking to someone and felt all these little taps on my hands. I looked down and the wasps were like "hey, watch it - we have a nest!" So I gently took the old hangar to the shavings pile and they never did a thing. The only time I was ever stung was when I put my hand through a nest by accident and was stung only once - my fault. I think they are really cool to watch and attentive parents to their nest. They eat flies, don't they? Really, never have found them to bother anyone or anything.
              I do remove them from the horse trailer though.

              Comment


              • #8
                For ground-nesting yellow jackets, I've had good results by waiting until well after dark and sousing the hole with spray, followed by a cup of Sevin powder dumped down the hole. If the first dose doesn't get them, the second does.

                Incidentally, if using a flashlight, cover the lens with red cellophane or use a "white" LED flashlight. The yellowjackets respond to infrared (heat) and a conventional flashlight may rile them.
                The inherent vice of Capitalism is the unequal sharing of blessings. The inherent virtue of Socialism is the equal sharing of miseries.
                Winston Churchill

                Comment


                • #9
                  like xeroxchick I leave the yellowjackets alone - live and let live - they don't bother me......

                  the red hornets on the other hand are really aggressive and their sting is nasty -- those I go after -- had hornets in my grill lid just like gloriginger - ugh

                  had a run-in with a ground nest of I don't know what species when I first moved to the place but fortunately that has not happened again

                  just this week - new species - - I think that they may be 'sweat bees' have been competing with the outside cat for his canned food - doesn't seem to bother the cat, he just keeps eating and when he's done the bees clean the stainless food bowl to a shine
                  Nothing says "I love you" like a tractor. (Clydejumper)

                  The reports states, “Elizabeth reported that she accidently put down this pony, ........, at the show.”

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    We have a professional come out once a month or so and do whatever needs doing. They spray around the house, the barn, and part of the deal is they make emergency calls if we find a yellowjacket nest or something. It's not very expensive, and they just DEAL WITH IT so I don't have to.
                    Click here before you buy.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      probably not good for anyone involved- but brake cleaner will drop yellow jackets right out of the sky!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        LOL - I use good ol" WD40

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A great help in controlling ground dwelling wasps and bees is this bright little bugger with a super cool name.

                          The Cow Killer.

                          Here are photos. http://www.google.com/images?hl=en&q...w=1920&bih=852

                          Here is some info on the Cow Killer, and its role in controlling ground nesting bees.

                          Don't let the name scare you - just leave 'em alone and they'll help keep you sting free.
                          Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
                          Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
                          -Rudyard Kipling

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I've never seen a 'cow killer'

                            I have seen a cicada killer and it was awesome
                            Nothing says "I love you" like a tractor. (Clydejumper)

                            The reports states, “Elizabeth reported that she accidently put down this pony, ........, at the show.”

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              brake cleaner is the bomb for paper wasp nests. Cheap and kills quick. Shoots like 30' too.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Originally posted by xeroxchick View Post
                                Yes, Ground Bees/Yellow Jackets are aggressive, attack and cause a problem, but wasps?
                                I don't allow ours to be sprayed or distroyed. They are actually not aggressive at all.
                                I agree. I have quite a lot of wasps in my barn, and we co-exist quite peacefully. Also, they have rid the barn of flies. So I don't allow them to be harmed. They are helpful creatures. Same goes for spiders.

                                If, however, I find them making a nest somewhere inconvenient (in my helmet, for example), I use a stream of hose water to force them to relocate.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Disclaimer. The following does NOT apply if you are allergic!!

                                  I don't bother any wasp nests unless they are somewhere easily bumped by humans or animals. Some wasps and bees are beneficial insects. They eat many, many pest insects and won't bother you unless they feel threatened. We have lived in harmony with them for years. There is even a large nest high on the rafters of our back porch. They never bother us because we could never possibly threaten their nest. But they eat bagworms off the trees, flies, and caterpillars (among other pests).

                                  Of course, I don't want anyone getting stung either so if they build a nest right where it could be bumped or knocked, it has to go. usually just upsetting the nest will force a relocation. Yellow Jackets are more agressive than regular wasps, but we don't have many. I think it's because we have a healthy population of the beneficial wasps, but could be wrong.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by TBDressage916 View Post
                                    probably not good for anyone involved- but brake cleaner will drop yellow jackets right out of the sky!
                                    Ditto! But I like carb cleaner, as it is more economical with the same punch. The literally hit the ground on contact.
                                    Experience is what you get, when you didn't get what you wanted.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      After having multiple run-ins w/ ground nesting yellowjackets this summer, I have come to appreciate the non-aggressive wasp.

                                      I hate a yellowjacket - kill 'em w/ the spray, but wasps are fine.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        we have those great big black and white faced hornets and they build a gorgeous paper nest. but are quite aggressive and the horses can hear the nests that are in my dressage letters ( overturned buckets) I leave 'em be at this point. They die off every winter and are good pollinators and cleaners-up of decaying anything.
                                        "The Threat of Internet Ignorance: ... we are witnessing the rise of an age of equestrian disinformation, one where a trusting public can graze on nonsense packaged to look like fact."-LRG-AF

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