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WEG Native Village - articles -out of the box

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  • WEG Native Village - articles -out of the box

    Horse culture is at its heart - 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games - Kentucky.com

    http://www.kentucky.com/2010/09/06/1422361/horse-culture-is-at-its-heart.html
    Horses - 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games

    Monday, Sep. 06, 2010

    Comments (4) | Recommend (1)

    Horse culture is at its heart


    Exhibit features demonstrations, performers, Kids' zone, more

    By Linda B. Blackford - lblackford@herald-leader.com

    Kathy Hopkins attended the 2006 World Equestrian Games in Aachen, Germany, and enjoyed the top-level competition and the top-drawer shopping.
    But something was missing, thought Hopkins, the director of equine education at the Kentucky Horse Park. And for the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games — the first time the event has been held in the United States — she wanted to see something more American.
    "We've got a very, very unique and diverse equestrian community in the United States," Hopkins said. "We didn't want this to be just about the competition, we wanted to include the entire equine community and celebrate the uniqueness of our horse culture."


    Charles Bertram | Staff
    The Equine Village at the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games will consist of exhibits, shows and booths throughout the Kentucky Horse Park.
    Charles Bertram
    Equine acrobat Tommie Turvey practiced his routine for the Games' opening ceremony in the Main Stadium at the Kentucky Horse Park last week. He also will be a featured Equine Village performer.
    Charles Bertram
    There will be five rings, including this one, featuring demonstrations by 350 horses a day at the Equine Village during the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games.



    Kentucky's contradictions to be highlighted at Games
    A village about all things Alltech
    Security will be tight for WEG
    WEG ticket sales heat up
    Showcasing the pavilions
    This is the last of three articles previewing The Kentucky Experience, The Alltech Experience and the Equine Village. The three areas at the Kentucky Horse Park will feature exhibits and demonstrations during the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games. They are open to all visitors who buy grounds passes to WEG.
    More Information
    More World Equestrian Games coverage
    Similar stories:
    WEG could be boon to horse-farm real estate market
    WEG could be boon to horse-farm real estate market
    For several years, Thoroughbred racehorse owner and breeder Gary Biszantz had been quietly willing to part with a couple hundred acres of his lush Cobra Farm at the corner of Iron Works and Newtown pikes.
    Now, with thousands of horse lovers passing by on the way to the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games next month, he's taking advantage of the unique opportunity with a prominent "for sale" sign.
    Asking price: $45,000 an acre.
    Singer Blake Shelton to kick off Spotlight Lexington festival
    Singer Blake Shelton to kick off Spotlight Lexington festival
    The Spotlight Lexington festival will open with country music singer Blake Shelton, performing Sept. 24 at Courthouse Plaza.
    Shelton, whose hit songs include Home and She Wouldn't Be Gone , will kick off the free entertainment, which will begin a day before the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games open and continue until they end Oct. 10.
    The festival will feature live entertainment, children's activities, and arts and crafts from Kentucky vendors in three downtown venues every day, mostly in the evening.
    Fair to complement WEG exhibits
    Fair to complement WEG exhibits
    While many Lexington businesses wait to see how the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games will benefit them this fall, two local entrepreneurs have created their own opportunity.
    Several years ago, when the Games were starting to coalesce, Kimberly Brown and Anne Buchanan decided to figure out what supporting activities the Games would need. They knew their effort should center on downtown, they knew it should involve education and entertainment, and most of all, they knew it should focus on horses.
    Two horse lovers themselves, they formed a company, Horse Capital Productions. With some ideas in mind, they booked the Lexington Center convention space during the two weeks of the Games, Sept. 25 to Oct. 10. Out of those beginnings, the International Equestrian Festival began to take shape.
    Tom Eblen: Annual Hats Off Day shows impact of horse industry
    Tom Eblen: Annual Hats Off Day shows impact of horse industry
    Drive past the suburbs and you quickly see that horses are a big industry in Central Kentucky. But a lot goes on beyond the plank fences that you might not realize.
    In addition to farms, there are feed companies, tack and equipment suppliers, van fleets, sales and insurance agencies, fence-builders, farriers and some of the world's most advanced animal research labs and clinics.
    Hardly a week goes by that people don't come to Lexington from all over the world for some kind of horse event. This week, for example, the Kentucky Horse Park is playing host to North American Young Riders, and large reining and hunter jumper competitions. And the International Symposium on Equine Reproduction, held every four years, is meeting in Lexington for the first time.
    Horse Park art exhibit to focus on Arabian horse
    Horse Park art exhibit to focus on Arabian horse
    As an archeologist who studies horse domestication, Sandra Olsen has studied horse artifacts all over the world, in one instance proving from a dig in Kazakhstan that horses had been domesticated as early as 3,600 B.C.
    But even she was blown away by a recent trip to Saudi Arabia to see the petroglyphs— art made on rock— of Saudi Arabia that feature early Arabian horses: "I didn't understand how staggering it is there," said Olsen, a curator at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh.
    The rocks show the length of the relationship Saudi Arabia and the rest of the Middle East have with Arabian horses — horses forged in sand and sun whose dainty looks belied their strength to survive the desert and great battles throughout history.
    And so was born the Equine Village, a horseapalooza of different breeds, clinicians, performers and hands-on experiences, all of it free with a general admission ticket to the Games. (For suggesting the idea, Hopkins got the privilege of running the whole thing, set around the Horse Park's visitors' center and museum.)
    From 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sept. 25 through Oct. 10, there will be equine activities in five rings at once, featuring at least 350 horses a day. People could spend all day watching clinicians like Pat Parelli, the dean of "natural horsemanship," or performers such as Tommie Turvey, the "Equine Extremist," who performs any number of acrobatics and tricks with his horses.
    Or they could visit the Connemara booth to meet those Irish ponies, or see why Andalusian horses are so prized for their dressage skills. The uniquely American breeds will be showcased, as well: the Nokota horses, which are descended from ranch, Indian and Spanish horses out West; the Rocky Mountain Horse; and the National Walking Horse.
    All of the breed organizations, clinicians and performers will come to the Horse Park at their own cost, even though many of their shows and clinics can bring in thousands of dollars in other venues.
    Turvey, who also will be performing in the Games' opening ceremonies, came to practice in the Main Stadium at the Horse Park last week on the way to another show. Just a simple rehearsal for him, which involved standing upright with one foot on each of his pinto horses as they galloped around the ring. Yes, he made it look easy, but no, it's not.
    "This is a huge event," Turvey said, explaining why he would come to be part of the Equine Village at a financial loss. "It's an event we want to be part of, not only to promote my training and my horses, but to promote myself as an entertainer."
    Turvey also will have a booth with his videos and training products for sale at the Equine Village.
    Hopkins has made sure there's something for everyone: a kids' zone with sand sculptures, live ponies and a Native American village; a farrier's exhibit; plenty of concessions; and access to the Museum of the Horse. The Breeds Barn will be taken over by the California Cowgirls drill team, a group of female Western riders who perform in unison. Polocrosse, a combination of polo, lacrosse and basketball, will be demonstrated. And what would an equine village be without an exhibit of the plastic Breyer horses so beloved by little girls?
    "We want to continue our mission to educate everyone about horses through entertainment, especially for the people of the commonwealth," Hopkins said.
    For more information about the Equine Village, go to www.Alltechfeigames.com and click on on-site attractions.


    Read more: http://www.kentucky.com/2010/09/06/1422361/horse-culture-is-at-its-heart.html#ixzz0yll3A1fg


    SECOND ARTICLE



    http://www.greenintheblue.com/horse-culture-is-at-its-heart/

    Horse culture is at its heart

    Kathy Hopkins attended the 2006 World Equestrian Games in Aachen, Germany, and enjoyed the top-level competition and the top-drawer shopping.

    But something was missing, thought Hopkins, the director of equine education at the Kentucky Horse Park. And for the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games — the first time the event has been held in the United States — she wanted to see something more American.

    “We’ve got a very, very unique and diverse equestrian community in the United States,” Hopkins said. “We didn’t want this to be just about the competition, we wanted to include the entire equine community and celebrate the uniqueness of our horse culture.”

    And so was born the Equine Village, a horseapalooza of different breeds, clinicians, performers and hands-on experiences, all of it free with a general admission ticket to the Games. (For suggesting the idea, Hopkins got the privilege of running the whole thing, set around the Horse Park’s visitors’ center and museum.)

    From 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sept. 25 through Oct. 10, there will be equine activities in five rings at once, featuring at least 350 horses a day. People could spend all day watching clinicians like Pat Parelli, the dean of “natural horsemanship,” or performers such as Tommie Turvey, the “Equine Extremist,” who performs any number of acrobatics and tricks with his horses.

    Or they could visit the Connemara booth to meet those Irish ponies, or see why Andalusian horses are so prized for their dressage skills. The uniquely American breeds will be showcased, as well: the Nokota horses, which are descended from ranch, Indian and Spanish horses out West; the Rocky Mountain Horse; and the National Walking Horse.

    All of the breed organizations, clinicians and performers will come to the Horse Park at their own cost, even though many of their shows and clinics can bring in thousands of dollars in other venues.

    Turvey, who also will be performing in the Games’ opening ceremonies, came to practice in the Main Stadium at the Horse Park last week on the way to another show. Just a simple rehearsal for him, which involved standing upright with one foot on each of his pinto horses as they galloped around the ring. Yes, he made it look easy, but no, it’s not.

    “This is a huge event,” Turvey said, explaining why he would come to be part of the Equine Village at a financial loss. “It’s an event we want to be part of, not only to promote my training and my horses, but to promote myself as an entertainer.”

    Turvey also will have a booth with his videos and training products for sale at the Equine Village.

    Hopkins has made sure there’s something for everyone: a kids’ zone with sand sculptures, live ponies and a Native American village; a farrier’s exhibit; plenty of concessions; and access to the Museum of the Horse. The Breeds Barn will be taken over by the California Cowgirls drill team, a group of female Western riders who perform in unison. Polocrosse, a combination of polo, lacrosse and basketball, will be demonstrated. And what would an equine village be without an exhibit of the plastic Breyer horses so beloved by little girls?

    “We want to continue our mission to educate everyone about horses through entertainment, especially for the people of the commonwealth,” Hopkins said.

    For more information about the Equine Village, go to Alltechfeigames.com and click on on-site attractions.


    via kentucky.com

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  • #2
    It gives me honest to God chills when I see Nokota Horses mentioned in these stories about the Equine Village at WEG.

    When I got a Nokota pony for my then 10 year old daughter, no one ever heard of Nokotas. That was 10 years ago in Pennsylvania. Now we'll be exhibiting at the World Equestrian Games.

    All made possible by Moonshine - the rags to riches story of the $800 Nokota. Wow. Just wow.

    For those with time to kill - here's Moonshine's story on Youtube:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPpFBgKip6o

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      And I did love that pony too, that's why I called you to get to know you when I heard you bought him. Because he was pretty special in my opinon, his eye was just soft and kind and he didn't step on my toes the night he arrived and was unloaded one balmy summer night, believe July at 10 PM and Leo Kuntz said, here Sue take him, he's quiet. And I led him into the barn and never stopped thinking about this cute grey pony. It was a good thing I didn't have the money to buy him, because I didn't need another horse to feed and with nothing for him to do. He found a perfect home with you.




      Originally posted by Mao View Post
      It gives me honest to God chills when I see Nokota Horses mentioned in these stories about the Equine Village at WEG.

      When I got a Nokota pony for my then 10 year old daughter, no one ever heard of Nokotas. That was 10 years ago in Pennsylvania. Now we'll be exhibiting at the World Equestrian Games.

      All made possible by Moonshine - the rags to riches story of the $800 Nokota. Wow. Just wow.

      For those with time to kill - here's Moonshine's story on Youtube:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPpFBgKip6o

      Comment

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