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Robby's Braiding Clinic ...

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  • Robby's Braiding Clinic ...

    [Originally posted in the Eventing forum]

    OK, Dezi and I did the braiding clinic today. She took the photos, and most of them are pretty good quality.

    If you're reading this as I'm posting, please don't comment until I finish the process, as I've numbered the photos in steps, and want future readers to be able to see them in a simple step-by-step process.

    I know this isn't nearly as comprehensive as it could be. If you still don't get it, please email me and we can chat about it on the phone, or perhaps I can attempt to do a few more photographs.

    Rhodey is our model in the photo. He got a bath before Dezi got to the barn, and I did bathe his mane well.

    The first photo is my braiding box. I keep all of my braiding equipment in it, as well as my small clippers. It's very handy as it also serves as a stool. I think I bought the step at KMart several years ago for around $30. It was pricey, but it's good quality.

    I use the grandma-style hair clips, black waxed thread cut into strips about 18" - 24" long. Note: I can usually sew in three braids with one strip of thread.

    I use a large metal craft needle which, as you can see, has a scrap piece of waxed thread threaded through the eye and tied in a knot. This prevents me from losing it, though I've lost it twice in two years - braiding the same horse at different times, if you can believe it! Talk about the proverbial needle in the haystack. Thankfully I'm really neurotic and found it both times.

    I use the bigger gold pull through for doing the forelocks.

    You can use any kind of comb you like. I don't know where I came up on the red comb, but I really like it as that hook at the end makes it easy to evenly part the mane.

    Also, I use a LONG piece of yarn around one of the handles of my (very sharp) scissors. I then just loop this around my waist. Sometimes I wear my Olive Garden apron, especially if I don't have a handy place to store my Quick Braid.

    For the sewn in button braids, I like the mane to be about 6 inches long, and pulled decently thin. Regardless of mane length, I use the 1/3 rule when parting the mane. If the mane is 6 inches long when pulled down taut, I part the mane at 2" increments.

    How you braid is important, too. I find that for braids I'm wanting to make "round," that braiding a little bit "out," instead of "down" is easier.

    Ok, here's my toolbox ...

    [This message was edited by Robby Johnson on Jun. 29, 2002 at 03:03 PM.]

    [This message was edited by Erin on Oct. 10, 2002 at 02:28 PM.]
    Attached Files
    When blood is the beverage of choice, the sharpest fangs feed first.
  • Original Poster

    #2
    [Originally posted in the Eventing forum]

    OK, Dezi and I did the braiding clinic today. She took the photos, and most of them are pretty good quality.

    If you're reading this as I'm posting, please don't comment until I finish the process, as I've numbered the photos in steps, and want future readers to be able to see them in a simple step-by-step process.

    I know this isn't nearly as comprehensive as it could be. If you still don't get it, please email me and we can chat about it on the phone, or perhaps I can attempt to do a few more photographs.

    Rhodey is our model in the photo. He got a bath before Dezi got to the barn, and I did bathe his mane well.

    The first photo is my braiding box. I keep all of my braiding equipment in it, as well as my small clippers. It's very handy as it also serves as a stool. I think I bought the step at KMart several years ago for around $30. It was pricey, but it's good quality.

    I use the grandma-style hair clips, black waxed thread cut into strips about 18" - 24" long. Note: I can usually sew in three braids with one strip of thread.

    I use a large metal craft needle which, as you can see, has a scrap piece of waxed thread threaded through the eye and tied in a knot. This prevents me from losing it, though I've lost it twice in two years - braiding the same horse at different times, if you can believe it! Talk about the proverbial needle in the haystack. Thankfully I'm really neurotic and found it both times.

    I use the bigger gold pull through for doing the forelocks.

    You can use any kind of comb you like. I don't know where I came up on the red comb, but I really like it as that hook at the end makes it easy to evenly part the mane.

    Also, I use a LONG piece of yarn around one of the handles of my (very sharp) scissors. I then just loop this around my waist. Sometimes I wear my Olive Garden apron, especially if I don't have a handy place to store my Quick Braid.

    For the sewn in button braids, I like the mane to be about 6 inches long, and pulled decently thin. Regardless of mane length, I use the 1/3 rule when parting the mane. If the mane is 6 inches long when pulled down taut, I part the mane at 2" increments.

    How you braid is important, too. I find that for braids I'm wanting to make "round," that braiding a little bit "out," instead of "down" is easier.

    Ok, here's my toolbox ...

    [This message was edited by Robby Johnson on Jun. 29, 2002 at 03:03 PM.]

    [This message was edited by Erin on Oct. 10, 2002 at 02:28 PM.]
    When blood is the beverage of choice, the sharpest fangs feed first.

    Comment

    • Original Poster

      #3
      Spray with Quick Braid, comb through, then section off the mane, taking care to ensure a straight, even part.

      Think Marcia Brady.
      Attached Files
      When blood is the beverage of choice, the sharpest fangs feed first.

      Comment

      • Original Poster

        #4
        Braid down. How you braid is important. In these photos I've not used the "leveraged thumb" method, as with rounder braids, I find they're not quite as "round" when I sew them up. This is the standard twist your wrists method of braiding. Just make sure when you get to the bottom you hold it tight.
        Attached Files
        When blood is the beverage of choice, the sharpest fangs feed first.

        Comment

        • Original Poster

          #5
          When you've braided down, take your threaded needle (I always keep it in my mouth, with about 4" of bight) and sew through the bottom of the braid, leaving about 1/2 inch of thread on the back side.
          Attached Files
          When blood is the beverage of choice, the sharpest fangs feed first.

          Comment

          • Original Poster

            #6
            I then wrap the thread around the bottom of the braid, push back through once from underneath to the top side, and sew in a 1/2 stitch. At this point, your braid is secure and ready to sew up.

            [This message was edited by Robby Johnson on Jun. 29, 2002 at 07:38 PM.]
            Attached Files
            When blood is the beverage of choice, the sharpest fangs feed first.

            Comment

            • Original Poster

              #7
              Using the needle, push through under the braid, at the crest, once. Pull it up, and you'll have a single-folded braid that looks like this.
              Attached Files
              When blood is the beverage of choice, the sharpest fangs feed first.

              Comment

              • Original Poster

                #8
                Because I am left-handed, I always bring the needle from the crest, to the left, and back down so that I can sew through both layers of the single-folded braid, at the bottom and push back through the crest, once again.

                You have to use your other hand to hold the braid in the ball shape. Sew tightly.

                Once I've gotten through both layers from the left, I come out from the crest and this time sew in through the double layers from the right side.

                [This message was edited by Robby Johnson on Jun. 29, 2002 at 03:05 PM.]
                Attached Files
                When blood is the beverage of choice, the sharpest fangs feed first.

                Comment

                • Original Poster

                  #9
                  this is me pushing through from the right.
                  Attached Files
                  When blood is the beverage of choice, the sharpest fangs feed first.

                  Comment

                  • Original Poster

                    #10
                    You can continue to sew under/in from either side, until the braid is as tight as you want it. I always find once each way to be sufficient. Again, sew in a 1/2 stitch at the top on your last pass, at the top of the crest. Then snip off with scissors.

                    This finished braid isn't my best in the world. At the bottom, I could've threaded better to make it a little more of a ball.

                    Try to sew in as close to the bottom of those double folds as you can. This will make your braid really round.

                    [This message was edited by Robby Johnson on Jun. 29, 2002 at 07:39 PM.]
                    Attached Files
                    When blood is the beverage of choice, the sharpest fangs feed first.

                    Comment

                    • Original Poster

                      #11
                      in this photo, Rhodey is wearing 13 braids, but could wear 14 if/when his longer bridle path grows out.

                      If I were braiding a horse for a three-day, I'd pull the mane to more like 4 inches, and I'd try to put about 20 ball braids in.

                      For the forelock, I (french) braid like a hunter. I prefer to keep the forelock pulled well enough that you don't have to sew in a ball on the end but, if yours is too long, you can certainly do just that, following the steps I outline above. You can do this with a french braid that is too long to slide under the ridge (like a hunter) or, if your horse doesn't have much forelock, you can skip the french braiding all together and treat it as if it's just another section of mane.

                      Feed your pony lots of carrots and tell him how good he is! Like my Rhodes Point is, here!

                      Robby
                      Attached Files
                      When blood is the beverage of choice, the sharpest fangs feed first.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thank you Robby! What a great demonstration, and Rhodey is a very handsome model. This should go in the archives.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thank you Robby.
                          I shall definately direct one and all to this thread. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]
                          http://community.webshots.com/user/cotswoldjr
                          http://temp.hillcresttrainingnet.off...m/default.aspx
                          [url]
                          Starman Babies

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            One dumb question.... What is a slip knot?

                            Thanks for your clinic...helps a lot! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

                            **~~Andrea and Dreamer~~**
                            "Why does it take a lifetime to learn to live a lifetime?"- Ray Hunt
                            "I've spent most of my life riding horses. The rest I've just wasted. - Unknown
                            Drea

                            Comment

                            • Original Poster

                              #15
                              <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by *In Your Dreams*:
                              One dumb question.... What is a slip knot?

                              Thanks for your clinic...helps a lot! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

                              **~~Andrea and Dreamer~~**
                              "Why does it take a lifetime to learn to live a lifetime?"- Ray Hunt
                              "I've spent most of my life riding horses. The rest I've just wasted. - Unknown<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                              A tailor I'm not! Where I said "slip knot" I meant to say "1/2 stitch." I'll go back and edit those! A slip knot is one that comes lose when you pull it. We don't want that with our braids, now do we?

                              Thanks for catching that!

                              Robby

                              You may be only one person in the world, but you may also be the world to one person.
                              When blood is the beverage of choice, the sharpest fangs feed first.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                nice to have Close UP photos to really SEE what the brider is doing!!!

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Robby & Dezi -- thanks for the clinic!! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img] It will be very helpful to a lot of people (including me!). You should submit it to some magazines & try to get it published.

                                  If you lend someone $20 and you never see them again, it was probably worth it.
                                  \"So shines a good deed in a weary world\" - Willy Wonka

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Thanks for the pix.
                                    Where do you get your waxed brading thread?
                                    \"So? We\'re Red Sox fans, psychosis is expected.\"

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      thanks robby! Very helpful. I need to learn how to braid nicely before this weekend's big dressage show. I might just try your technique. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

                                      ~*Lindsay*~
                                      A proud co-owner of CorLin PROductions, specializing in dressage, eventing, and hunter/jumper digital photography.

                                      ~*Co-founder of the COTH Photographer's clique*~
                                      Lindsay

                                      Check out my blog at http://lindsayberreth.com

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Weezie -- you can get it from Bitofbritian

                                        ~Cass

                                        "Dont let your schooling interfere with your education" -- Mark Twain
                                        Jocelyn
                                        ______________________

                                        I take a chance, and steal away this movie moment -Mae

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