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Best Horse-Care Tips

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  • Best Horse-Care Tips

    Ok, we all have them...those little secrets that save time at home or add that special touch at a show...A couple of my favorites:

    1) Fake-fleece mitts, designed for washing cars, make the best buffing cloths I've ever found for high boots--use after a regular rag for extra shine.

    2) Baby wipes--for any and all last-minute touch-ups at the ring. Particularly good for removing manure spots from grey horses...

    3) Hooks and snaps. I bring extra bucket hooks, double ended snaps, and the like to shows--and always wind up using them for something!

    4) Tupperware and ziplock bags. A place for everything and everything in its place [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    5) Put a small rag over the toe of your left boot when mounting a light colored horse, it will prevent a smudge mark on the horse's shoulder...

    6) Even at home, I pre-bag a week's worth of grain/supplements in either ziplock or brown paper bags (at the barn here at school, we are responsible for graining our own horses). Preparing it in advance means I'm less likely to forget electrolytes or something and will know well in advance when I'm low on feed. Saves me time, too.

    What good tricks does everyone else have?

    Jess
  • Original Poster

    #2
    Ok, we all have them...those little secrets that save time at home or add that special touch at a show...A couple of my favorites:

    1) Fake-fleece mitts, designed for washing cars, make the best buffing cloths I've ever found for high boots--use after a regular rag for extra shine.

    2) Baby wipes--for any and all last-minute touch-ups at the ring. Particularly good for removing manure spots from grey horses...

    3) Hooks and snaps. I bring extra bucket hooks, double ended snaps, and the like to shows--and always wind up using them for something!

    4) Tupperware and ziplock bags. A place for everything and everything in its place [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

    5) Put a small rag over the toe of your left boot when mounting a light colored horse, it will prevent a smudge mark on the horse's shoulder...

    6) Even at home, I pre-bag a week's worth of grain/supplements in either ziplock or brown paper bags (at the barn here at school, we are responsible for graining our own horses). Preparing it in advance means I'm less likely to forget electrolytes or something and will know well in advance when I'm low on feed. Saves me time, too.

    What good tricks does everyone else have?

    Jess

    Comment


    • #3
      Cloth unfolded diapers. Good for just about everything and does not leave lint like terry cloth towels. You get a doz in a package.

      Comment


      • #4
        Infusium 23 for your horse's tail. Comb in, leave on, tail gets full and healthy without that overly shiney, slick look that Show Sheen can leave.
        If you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor.
        Desmond Tutu

        Comment


        • #5
          Old pantyhose are great for buffing boots. Sounds weird but it works. Also, if you have trouble putting on tight boots, try putting a plastic sack (from the grocerty store) over your foot and leg, then pull on the boots. They go right on!

          Comment


          • #6
            Cornstarch in your boots works well if they are tight.
            Man plans. God laughs.

            Comment


            • #7
              Believe it or not, WINDEX works great at getting manure stains off of gray horses, and it doesn't irritate their skin. Saves lots of time in the wash rack!!!
              *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

              walmart free since 2003

              *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

              Comment


              • #8
                I like this thread! Well, I have to groom a lot. I have a bay who loves to be dirty and a grey who likes to stay clean[er].

                * Baby powder: It's great for touching up socks/white facial markings.
                * Vaseline: Makes chestnuts easier to pick. If your horse has scars, it makes them look alittle better, too.
                * Baby oil: I won't give a bath without it! Mix it in with rinse water to make coats shinier and softer. Use it when you clip a bridle path too. It gets rid of that chalky, just-cut look.
                * Tack products with beeswax: It softens leather great! It also adds a great shine to boots.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi;
                  These are great ideas. Here is another one that may seem odd but I have done it for years. I can't afford those fancy boot bags, so take my high boots to shows in a pillow case! It keeps them clean, is easy to carry and recognizable in my tack trunk!
                  You'd think I'd know better.

                  AQHA Clique, Pony Club Clique and Member/Co-founder of the Boot to the Head Clique! (Members NOT wanted)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by VWScully:
                    Hi;
                    These are great ideas. Here is another one that may seem odd but I have done it for years. I can't afford those fancy boot bags, so take my high boots to shows in a pillow case! It keeps them clean, is easy to carry and recognizable in my tack trunk!
                    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
                    Does anyone know of anything that will help with those miserable "scratches" that are so common on white ankles and legs, besides Panalog.....Panalog is expensive and sometimes works and sometimes doesn't.....and for $80 a bottle......IT SHOULD WORK!!! I don't know if anyone has a home remedy that they learned from an old horseman........sometimes they are the best!(both the remedies and the old horsement!!!!HAHAHA)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      There are various scratches remedies:

                      Mixture of Dexetin and Furazone
                      Wash legs with Selsun Blue shampoo
                      Dry legs thoroughly after every bath (use towel)
                      Unfortunately, I'd also add Panalog as an ointment, it does seem to work, however it is expensive.
                      There are other ointments vets can give you such as Otomax (similar to Panalog but a bit stronger)
                      Keep legs clean and dry.

                      Good luck.
                      ROYAAL Z (Ramiro Z x Fanny Girl Z by Ferdinand)
                      www.royaalz.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Look Up - you can get Dermalone from a vet, which is just like Panalog except you can get it in a small $10 tube.

                        To heal acute scratches - NEVER get the horse's legs wet. Water is a huge factor in aggravating the condition.

                        If your horse must get turned out or bathed, apply TONS of Healex to the affected area to completely seal it off from the water/mud.

                        Do the horse up in Panalog/Dermalone using pastern bandages or Vetwrap around the whole foot, just don't do the Vetwrap too tight.
                        Man plans. God laughs.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Some of my tips

                          - keep sponges with traces of Lexol on them in your grooming kit for quick swipes at tack and boots

                          -little tupperware containers are great for storing horse treats, or other little things like extra bit keepers etc.

                          -THE LIST - a computer spread sheet which lists all the chores I have to do before a show- all the things to wash and exactly what to pack. Print it out- cross off what is seasonally inappropriate (IE blankets in summer) or not needed, then check off chores as you do them and items as you pack them. Works like a charm- as long as it's on the list you should remember it!

                          - and - my fav- always, always, always bring extra towels or cloths - they are good from everything from making a horse shine to buffing to bandaging.

                          ~S.
                          Sarah ( & Regal)

                          what doesn't kill you makes you stronger -
                          unless it breaks your heart first

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I was told years and years ago that you should use newspaper to buff up all of your bits, spurs, stirrups, etc. Wash all items with soap and water, then shine with newspaper. It makes everything really bright and it is safer to use than any kind of polish (especially near the bit section that is in the horses mouth).

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Back to Boot care. . .For many of us, these are a huge investment and thus, most be treated as such - also, because shiny, polished boots look so much nicer:
                              - Only use galoushes (sp) (rubbers) when absolutely necessary - i.e. extremely muddy - and if you do, make sure they are clean on the inside - just a titch of dirt/sand inside will damage your boots - they also rub the finish you've worked so hard to put on that toe. (You also won't have to keep buying new ones so often when you leave them at the ring.)
                              - The old cloth baby diapers work great - also the old nylon sock
                              - I made boot bag "liners" out of old flannel sheets with a drawstring at the top - they are actually buffing my boots when being moved around - not just protecting them - I then put those in the nylon boot bags in my trainers' colors. Make sure your tabs at the top of the boots end up facing down when you slide the boots into the liners.
                              - Don't put your boots away sweaty and muddy!!! Even if you won't have time to polish til the next show - make sure they are at least clean - just a damp sponge/towel - NO SADDLE SOAP EVER
                              - Try not to leave in a hot/steamy, closed up car to too much time, i.e., don't leave in any environment you wouldn't leave your saddle/bridle/chaps in, if possible.

                              Anyway, these ideas work for me. I hope I don't sound like a total boot geek (even if I am. . )

                              - Oh - forgot one - not on boot care - but on getting more than snug ones on - spray that silicone stray on your calves before pulling on your boots. Also, when you get measured - or if you already have, it's worth a try - put on a thin cotton (or whatever is your preference) ankle or so high sock underneath your nylon knee-high. Helps for warmth, comfort and rubs.
                              \"Riding a horse is not a gentle hobby, to be picked up and laid down like a game of solitaire. It is a grand passion. It seizes a person whole and, once it has done so, he will have to accept that his life will be radically changed.\" -- Ralph Waldo E

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Hi,
                                I really don't take very good care of my boots, I always forget to clean them. At least they stay somewhere warm in winter, cool in summer. Duffy, or anybody else, why shouldn't you use saddle soap on your boots?

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Hi mac_legs - I don't use saddle soap on my boots because it ruins the shine, thereby negating all my hard work to get them that way. I'm sure it's not bad for the leather, but I've found it makes them tacky and hard to polish.

                                  I love the ideas on this thread! I definately second bringing those double-ended snaps, extras! I also ration out seam rippers and hoofpicks. If I put all of them in my trunk at once, they'd be gone in the course of a show or two. So, I keep my extra stash in my car/garage and bring those little supplies out one by one. I find that way people "borrowing" them end up taking better care of them. They seem to end up back in my trunk more often than not. That goes for ear poms as well.

                                  [This message has been edited by Duffy (edited 03-05-2000).]
                                  \"Riding a horse is not a gentle hobby, to be picked up and laid down like a game of solitaire. It is a grand passion. It seizes a person whole and, once it has done so, he will have to accept that his life will be radically changed.\" -- Ralph Waldo E

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Another good thing to use to treat scratches on legs is Destin... it works great on white areas as it whites and protects...
                                    I am not usually one to be brand loyal, but I shampoo with anything but Quic Color ( works on my grey with black flea bits and an colored horse. And it really works.. And it does great on helping a sunburnt coat look much better!!!) Though I do sometimes use Orvus as it is not only econmical, but gentle and works in hot and cold water. Word of advice with orvus.. add to a full bucket of water... otherwise its suds city!!!
                                    After trying several shine enhancer products I still prefer Show Sheen... ya gott be careful around the saddle area, but nothing keeps stains and dirt away better.
                                    And while winter seems to be over at least here in Michigan... vaseline, or cooking spray on the soles of hooves helps keep snowballs away.
                                    I also always pack extra lead ropes and most importantly halters for shows. You never know when you or a friend will need them.
                                    And while it may look a little odd.. I have found that once dress a pair of nylon soccer shorts... the baggy style wokrs well in keeping stains off britches... and a light weight oxford shirts protects your hunt shirt. The shorts are easy to pull off and light wieght enough in summer to keep heat stroke away!!!

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Thanks for the info on scratches.....I will try the suggestions.....I have learned to always dry the legs....however, I've read in my veterinary book that you must also keep the areas affected clean...so you have to wash them.......drying though is imperative.
                                      Thanks again!

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        LookUp, Shorten Reins - Definitely give the Desitin a try. Actually, got WalMart or Target - their generic brand is much cheaper. Get the kind with 40% zinc oxide though, not the 10%. Personally, I think you should quit washing altogether - you're just re-introducing the moisture you're trying to avoid, and it's really, really hard to get them completely dry afterwards. Just give the whites a really good, close shave (tranq if you have too), and liberally apply the ointment twice a day. Re-shave every 3-4 weeks. If you are just dealing with scabs, the desitin should do the trick. If they scabs are oozing and/or bleeding though, mixing in some furazone is a good idea. I've been dealing with this nasty stuff since August with Rio - we used Cyt-Oxyl, "dew poisoning" ointment, you name it - all a waste of my money. Desitin starting working in a matter of weeks. Good luck with this - what a pain in the @$$.
                                        ______________________________
                                        The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET

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