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jewelry around horses... what holds up best?

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  • jewelry around horses... what holds up best?

    Hey guys, I was reading through Nicolodian's great news thread (congrats!), and subsequently through the "engagement rings" OT thread that someone pointed out. There was a lot of useful info in there, and I was wondering whether anyone had more specific experience of how different metals and settings take the beating of wear around horses and the barn.

    I'm not much of a jewelry person, but I do wear a stainless steel ring which seems to be doing OK, with the exception of a very few scratches.

    I've been scratching my head over potential metals and settings for an engagement ring (not that there's a snowball's chance in... uh... heck... that Mr. Kirsten is likely to pop the question anytime soon, but I like to plan ahead). I've heard platinum is the hardest metal and doesn't bend out of shape (good for diamond settings), but I've seen a couple of people whose platinum rings are badly scratched. Anyone know if platinum generally scratches worse than white gold? I know that the lower carat white gold is hardest... but as far as looking good through the years, I have a 10-carat white gold school ring that has so many tiny scratches from day-to-day wear that it's nowhere near as shiny as it used to be. I've also heard that with white gold, you can just get it replated... and that you don't have that option with platinum.

    Is it feasible to use platinum prongs to set the diamond, and use white gold for the rest of the ring? For those who have a "traditional" 4-prong or a Tiffany-style 6-prong setting, do you even find it catches on things at the barn or that you worry about bashing it around? Ever scratch your saddle or something by accident? Those who have lower settings, do you find it takes away from the sparkliness of the diamond? Are larger diamonds more likely to cause an issue (i.e. do they require a higher setting or generally get in the way)?

    Sorry this is so long... as I said, I like to be prepared just in case. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif[/img] And since anything I wear is going to have to withstand riding, setting jumps, and cleaning tack among other things, I want to make sure it'll still look good for the rest of my life. Any real-life experience would be very much appreciated.
  • Original Poster

    #2
    Hey guys, I was reading through Nicolodian's great news thread (congrats!), and subsequently through the "engagement rings" OT thread that someone pointed out. There was a lot of useful info in there, and I was wondering whether anyone had more specific experience of how different metals and settings take the beating of wear around horses and the barn.

    I'm not much of a jewelry person, but I do wear a stainless steel ring which seems to be doing OK, with the exception of a very few scratches.

    I've been scratching my head over potential metals and settings for an engagement ring (not that there's a snowball's chance in... uh... heck... that Mr. Kirsten is likely to pop the question anytime soon, but I like to plan ahead). I've heard platinum is the hardest metal and doesn't bend out of shape (good for diamond settings), but I've seen a couple of people whose platinum rings are badly scratched. Anyone know if platinum generally scratches worse than white gold? I know that the lower carat white gold is hardest... but as far as looking good through the years, I have a 10-carat white gold school ring that has so many tiny scratches from day-to-day wear that it's nowhere near as shiny as it used to be. I've also heard that with white gold, you can just get it replated... and that you don't have that option with platinum.

    Is it feasible to use platinum prongs to set the diamond, and use white gold for the rest of the ring? For those who have a "traditional" 4-prong or a Tiffany-style 6-prong setting, do you even find it catches on things at the barn or that you worry about bashing it around? Ever scratch your saddle or something by accident? Those who have lower settings, do you find it takes away from the sparkliness of the diamond? Are larger diamonds more likely to cause an issue (i.e. do they require a higher setting or generally get in the way)?

    Sorry this is so long... as I said, I like to be prepared just in case. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif[/img] And since anything I wear is going to have to withstand riding, setting jumps, and cleaning tack among other things, I want to make sure it'll still look good for the rest of my life. Any real-life experience would be very much appreciated.

    Comment


    • #3
      I have a platinum engagement ring and it seems to be holding up really well. If I'm doing something rather dirty or damaging I try to put on gloves, but most times my ring is nekkid. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img] I haven't noticed any horrible damage. It got a bit scratched but it adds character. I am going to take it in once a year to do a thourough cleaning and buffing though, to keep it healthy.

      "Friends don't let friends reply to all"
      \"Friends don\'t let friends reply to all\"

      Comment


      • #4
        I have a platinum, six prong solitaire (round cut), 2.53 carats, and yes, the size of the stone does bother me when I ride (oh, such a complaint, ha ha) because it slips to the inside between my fingers sometimes (when I'm no bloated [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]) and it is a pain when wearing gloves...aside from these issues, I love it, but the platinum does looked scratched to me - or is it just in need of a cleaning? It shines up nicely (have done this twice in 5 years). Sorry can't offer more info. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif[/img]

        My horse bucked off your honor student

        Comment


        • #5
          I have a platinum solitaire, 3 karats, that is set really, really high--when I first saw it, all I could think about was what to do about riding gloves! However, that has proven not to be much of a problem. Also, I thought I would catch it on everything (it is set WAY high) but for some reason it just really is not an issue (although I did catch it in a tangly mane once over a jump). One caveat: I must say that I find that my platinum ring is quite scratched up and I have only had it for a little over a year. It just looks nice and worn-in, though, not dingy or anything.

          Comment


          • #6
            How do you keep it from bugging you in gloves? I'm interested...I've even thought I'd cut a hole for the stone in the gloves, but then decided not to.

            ***My horse bucked off your honor student!***

            Comment


            • #7
              I think that what happens is, when I slip my gloves on, it immediately slides over toward my pinkie finger so that it is almost lying flat--does that make sense??!??! Plus, I wear laced gloves--can't do leather with these thing on! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

              Comment


              • #8
                Kinda OT, but my gold bracelet that I've had since I was 8 years old got lost at the barn yesterday! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif[/img] [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif[/img] I'm sooooo sad.
                ~MP

                *Founding member of the 'Starmite Rocks My World' CLICK*
                http://www.bigeq.com/info/remembrances/pocoloco.html

                http://community.webshots.com/user/starmite

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have a 1.5 carat round solitare set in a six prong, very high 14K white gold "catherdal" setting. (that means the sides of the ring swoop up to the sides of the prongs and diamond)

                  I've had it two years - and it's not come off my hand yet, even with a year taking care of 11 horses. (OK, it does go in my pocket when I clean sheaths) It hardly has any wear at all. One or two very minor scratches. When I take the time to clean it, it looks brand new.

                  Mr. A&A specifically went in with the "I need the most durable setting you've got" line - and was told that 14K white gold is more sturdy than platinum. It's also WAY less expensive.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If you wear gloves, and you smash the ring and the stone comes out of its setting, it is STILL IN THE GLOVE. Plus, have you ever caught a ring on something? Think of all the horrible "somethings" that are in a barn...

                    If the stone is big, try turning the ring so the stone is on the palm side of your hand.

                    Personally, I have NEVER had to worry about my diamond being "too big." [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] At just over one-third of a carat, I guess some would consider it more of a friendship ring. But since I married my bestest friend ever, guess it's appropriate!

                    Besides, it has the highest grade color you can find in a diamond, and I could blind you with it! (and it is "almost" flawless - like my marriage! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img])

                    "I am not afraid of storms, for I am learning to sail my ship."
                    -Louisa May Alcott
                    "My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we'll change the world." ~ Jack Layton

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You know what, that is actually a huge misconception (I was guilty of thinking it, too): artienallie stated that white gold was way cheaper than platinum but that is actually not true. We priced my ring in both platinum and white gold (thinking white gold might scratch less) and teh difference was only in the hundreds of dollars. Not a big chunck of change when you are shelling out $10,000 or so for something you will keep for the rest of your life. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        . . . it's the risk that you will lose the stone. It is very easy to catch the setting on something around the barn or when riding and pop the stone out, and your chances of ever finding it again are about a million to one.

                        My wife NEVER wears any jewelry with a stone setting (e.g., her diamond engagement ring) to the barn or when riding.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Titanium!

                          Mr. Batgirl and I are getting new wedding bands that are made out of titanium!!! Check out www.tirings.com

                          I never wear my diamond ring to the barn, though. It gets dirty too easily, and I won't ride with rings on.

                          "Both rider and horse must enjoy the work. This is the essence of success" - Reiner Klimke
                          "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I've known three people who have suffered badly broken (and one nearly detached) fingers when their engagement rings caught on something while they were riding or working with their horses. Consequently I never wear my engagement ring to the barn. My wedding ring is a lovely "eternity ring" with channel set diamonds going all the way around the band. Nothing sticks out, it never catches on anything and I never take it off. That might be another option to consider.
                            www.laurienberenson.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Regarding Platinum being scratched.....

                              This is how 4 different jewlers explained it to me....

                              Gold does not scratch (at least not much)...why? because any scratch that would be there isn't because the metal actually comes off. So gold will become thinner and thinner over time.

                              Platinum scratches but when it does the metal moves to each side of the scratch. None of the metal is actually lost. When the metal begins to look scratched, get it cleaned and all of the metal will flatten back out to a shine.

                              A jewler that I absolutely trust and knows my lifestyle would only let me get a platinum ring. He said gold would be a lopsided mess in 6 months. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

                              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                              I'm engaged!!! Go ahead ask me about it!!!
                              My adventures as a working rider

                              theworkingrider.blogspot.com

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                I can't believe no one has mentioned this yet..... (oops Laurie B beat me to it)

                                I promise I am not trying to be rude, but do you know how dangerous it is to wear rings around horses? I have heard countless horror stories of people getting their fingers ripped clean off from incidents (even with quiet horses) that happen so quickly you wouldn't believe it. I love my wedding band, engagement ring, earrings, and bracelet but I don't do anything with the horses until I take them off. Things just happen too quickly. My husband is a police officer, and as much as I would like the world to know he is MARRIED ( [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img] ) while he is working, we would both much rather he have his ring finger at the end of his shift, so he doesn't wear his when he works. Freak accidents happen WAY too easy. Just my opinion though.


                                ***
                                The hardest to learn was the least complicated.
                                ***
                                The hardest to learn was the least complicated.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  OK getting really off topic here...
                                  But does anyone not wear their wedding ring - I mean I hardly ever wear it - it's always in my purse. This started when I started riding more than one horse... I found that I couldn't ride in it (gave me nasty caluses on my finger) and since I tend to go to work straight from the barn (or vise versa) I would always forget to put it back on.... Now it's a habit.
                                  To tell the truth I've never really liked the feel of anything on my hands or wrists - I hardly ever wear a watch and avoid gloves unless it's really cold.
                                  My engagement ring hasn't seen the light of day in years and my wedding ring surfaces occasionally for family events - my mother is horrified [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif[/img]

                                  So am I the only married woman in the country that doesn't wear a wedding ring? Anyone have any barn friendly marriage symbol ideas - it's not like I have any regrets being married or anything - my SO is a wonderful husband! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

                                  Maybe I should just get my finger tattooed (ouch [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif[/img])

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Oh, please. Life is short. It is not worth it to me to take off my beautiful and meaningful engagement ring (that I could possibly misplace) every time I get on a horse. Plus, I don't do strenuous barn work or longe young horses or anything, so I really would rather take the tiny, tiny chance (of what? I am not quite sure what can happen when you are merely jumping a 3'6" course) of something happening. I bet y'all are the ones who wear those protective vests, too . . .

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      p.s. This was in response to kt, not Murdoch. I have lots of friends who take off their wedding ring simply b/c it "bugs" them (including my husband when he plays golf)!

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        Old fashioned, deep, well protected settings.

                                        I must get Mr. Wings to read this topic and put his thoughts in for the old fashioned settings!

                                        Since the title for the thread is "jewelry around horses" I must put in for DIAMOND Stud earrings. No dangling or drop styles, no hoops, etc. No bracelets that can catch in gate/stall latches of the caulks on horseshoes.

                                        Mr. Wings (King of the Pawn Shops in a former employment) just started working for the Transportation Security Administration and, with conveyer belts all around him, is now wearinging ring strung on a neck chain WHILE he is at work [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

                                        Safety is important.

                                        Auntie Pat would assure you that it is perfectly appropriate and comfortable to have multiple 1/2 carat channel set diamonds under a suitably and discretely gloved hand.

                                        Friendship is Love without his wings
                                        -Lord Byron
                                        "If you would have only one day to live, you should spend at least half of it in the saddle."

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