Wednesday, Apr. 17, 2024

Sports Medicine

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Eight months ago, Flexible’s career was supposed to be over. The winner of the 2012 Rolex FEI World Cup Final couldn’t trot for more than a few minutes without going dead lame.

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Our columnist explains how equine sports medicine technologies are building momentum at a pace human doctors can only dream of.

As a sport horse veterinarian, I sometimes have to step back and ask myself, “How did things change so much, so fast?”

Our columnist explores why many “experts” base their conclusions on a singular experience—and shouldn’t.

I met someone at a party the other day, and he asked me about a problem that his horse had. Before I could respond, the partygoer standing next to me (drink in hand) jumped in and told the person what the diagnosis was, what he needed to do and what the horse’s problem was going to be in recovery.

Several changes happened to national and international medication rules last fall. You probably heard the controversy and discussion surrounding one or both, which isn’t surprising if you read this magazine or actively compete.

One of the issues is the U.S. Equestrian Federation single non-steroidal anti-inflammatory rule. This is a discussion about reducing two allowed NSAIDs (such as bute, Banamine, etc.) given to our horses down to one.

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