Saturday, Dec. 2, 2023

Obituaries–8/13/04

CINDY BURGE

Cindy Burge, of Medical Lake, Wash., died on July 28 as a result of injuries sustained in a fall from a horse on July 24 at The Event At Rebecca Farm in Kalispell, Mont. (see p. 34). She was 41.

Ms. Burge's horse Lucky Stripe fell while galloping between fences 16 and 17 on the preliminary cross-country course, rolling on her. The competition veterinarian, Rich Sylvester, examined Lucky Stripe and found no apparent injuries.

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CINDY BURGE

Cindy Burge, of Medical Lake, Wash., died on July 28 as a result of injuries sustained in a fall from a horse on July 24 at The Event At Rebecca Farm in Kalispell, Mont. (see p. 34). She was 41.

Ms. Burge’s horse Lucky Stripe fell while galloping between fences 16 and 17 on the preliminary cross-country course, rolling on her. The competition veterinarian, Rich Sylvester, examined Lucky Stripe and found no apparent injuries.

A paramedic nurse at the site administered immediate medical aid. The competition safety officer, Marty Boehme, and EMS staff arrived immediately and called the ALERT medivac. Within 22 minutes, Ms. Burge was transported to Kalispell Regional Medical Center, and later to the Trauma Unit in Missoula, Mont., where she remained in a coma.

Ms. Burge was the founder and organizer of the Deep Creek Horse Trials (Wash.) for more than 20 years and a former U.S. Eventing Association Area VII chairman, as well as an experienced rider and trainer and a Level 3 USEA eventing instructor. She had ridden at the advanced level for 20 years and won the inaugural High Prairie CCI** (Colo.) in 1996. She was highly involved in the North American Young Riders Championships, first as a rider (she won the individual silver medal at the 1982 NAYRC) and then as an area coach.

“More than anything, Cindy Burge and her Deep Creek family shared the essences of eventing with the Northwest,” said Area VII chairman Louise Leslie. “Many Northwest-erners will be sharing the stories of how Deep Creek provides the stage for developing many, many friendships that will continue to represent the legacy that Cindy left behind. Stories of camping along the creek where children stalked the elusive crawfish and riders waded with horses after finishing the challenging courses will become legendary. Cindy Burge is responsible for creating these strong bonds of the eventing family in the Northwest. Her memory and legacy will be with us all forever.”

John Camlin, an advanced event rider from Onalaska, Wash., remembered her as one of his best friends. “She was willing to sacrifice for the sport–putting the sport’s needs ahead of her own,” he said. “She ran her event because the area needed the event, and she never left a job half done.

“It was driving her crazy that they were changing three-day eventing,” Camlin added with a laugh.

She is survived by her parents, Ed and Sally Burge, Medical Lake, Wash.; sister Debbie Burge of Lakeside, Mont.; brother Curt Burge, Medical Lake, Wash.; and her husband Jerry Ackerman of Espanola, Wash.; as well as four nieces and nephews.

Friends and family held a memorial service, including a slide show of Ms. Burge and her horses throughout the years, at Deep Creek Farm on Aug. 4. The family has designated a memorial fund to provide training for an outstanding novice rider who serves eventing behind the scenes. Memorial donations may also be made to the Deep Creek Horse Trials.

Condolences may be sent to Kaye Ham-brook, Deep Creek Horse Trials Event Secre-tary, via e-mail: kmhambrook@comcast.net or by mail to: Deep Creek Horse Trials, 811 N. Deep Creek Road, Medical Lake, WA 99022.

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Staff

KILCOLTRIM

Jonathan Elliott’s event horse Kilcoltrim, most recently campaigned by Elliott’s wife, Suzy Pettman, was humanely destroyed on July 30. He was 15.

The Irish-bred Thoroughbred, by Kings Servant, out of Kilcoltrims Pride, had been suffering frequent bouts of colic, and exploratory surgery revealed an enormous mass in his stomach cavity. “We made the decision to put him down to spare him any more suffering, as [the mass] was only going to get bigger, and he was going to get sicker,” said Pettman.

The 16.3-hand, bay gelding was listed for the 2004 Canadian Olympic team after he and Pettman placed 23rd in April’s Rolex Kentucky modified CCI****.
Kilcoltrim twice completed Kentucky–once with Elliott and once with Pettman. He also completed the 2000 Burghley CCI**** (England), twice completed the Fair Hill CCI*** (Md.), with a seventh place last year for Pettman, and he and Elliott placed 12th at the Foxhall CCI*** (Ga.).

“He had a lot of character; he was like an overgrown pony and he loved to eat,” said Pettman. “He was very tough–he kept going right ’til the end.”

Kilcoltrim and Pettman had competed in the advanced division at the Wayne Horse Trials (Ill.) just two weeks earlier. “He gave me some fantastic experience; he was a real confidence-booster because he was a real talented horse and really giving,” she said.

He is buried in his field in Ocala, Fla.
Staff

Carol Pyle Jones Fry

Lifelong horse enthusiast Carol Pyle Jones Fry, of West Marlborough, Pa., died on July 25 in a car accident near her home. She was 93.

Mrs. Fry was the wife of the late Russell B. Jones and the late Guy Fry, and she was the daughter of Irwin W. and Gertrude M. Pyle of Walnut Green Farm, Brandywine Summit, Pa.

A lifelong foxhunter, Mrs. Fry also received the Gold Medal of Honor from the American Watercolor Society. She was also an elected member of the National Academy of Design, where her work is part of the permanent collection. Her paintings also hang in the permanent collection of the University of Delaware, the Wister Institute, the Delaware Art Museum, and many private collections.

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Mrs. is survived by sons Russell B. Jones Jr. and Richard I.G. Jones, both of Unionville, Pa.; eight grandchildren; 14 great-grandchildren; sister Ruthellen Pyle Davis of Newtown Square, Pa.; and brother G. Martin Pyle of Dallas, Texas.

Memorial contributions in Mrs. Fry’s name can be made to The Cheshire Land Preservation Fund, P.O. Box 983, Unionville, Pa., 19375 or to the West Chester University Foundation, c/o West Chester University, 628 High Street, West Chester, PA, 19383. Staff

Opal Ellen Hernholm

Virginia horsewoman Opal Ellen Hernholm, died July 19. She was 75.

Mrs. Hernholm comes from a long line of horsemen, including father Gordon Weeks, an amateur steeplechase jockey from Middleburg, Va., and grandfather Andrew Cleveland, a blacksmith in Bailey’s Crossroads, Va.

Mrs. Hernholm bought and sold more than 65 hunter and jumper horses during her lifetime, and had a love of Welsh ponies and Thoroughbreds. She stood well-known Thor-oughbred stallions Minute n’ Change (Counse-lor’s Image–Jayla, by Roanoke Island), who showed to many championships as Southern Dancer, and Thirdahr (Salem–Daphne’s Darling, by Timberlane). For years she enjoyed watching her horses show on the A-rated circuit and at local Virginia shows.

“My mother’s greatest legacy was she was always willing to help an animal or child in need,” said daughter Clarice Hernholm-Kendrick.

Mrs. Hernholm was a licensed real estate broker and agent.

Mrs. Hernholm is survived by her husband of 58 years, George Noel Hernholm, and her four children–George Hernholm Jr., Dr. Karen Trump, Susan Renee Hernholm, and Clarice Hernholm-Kendrick.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Middleburg Humane Foundation, P. O. Box 1238, Middleburg, VA 20118. Staff

Allie Miller

Avid pony rider Allie Miller of Virginia died on May 13 after a long battle with a rare childhood cancer. She was 11.
Despite surgeries, radiation and chemo-therapy, Miss Miller continued to successfully compete her pony, A Windy Day, on the Vir-ginia horse show circuit until this spring. She was also a member of the Virginia Horse Show Association.

She is survived by parents Mike and Lori Miller and her 3-year-old brother, Luke. Memorial contributions may be sent to Scoring for Children (www.scoringforchildren.com) P.O. Box 57, Ashburn, VA 20146.
Staff

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