Friday, May. 24, 2024

Myrick Makes Waves At Equestrians Institute Dressage

he Equestrians' Institute Beaujolais Dressage show probably felt a little more like a swim meet than a horse show. Rain left giant puddles in all three rings, June 16-18 in Auburn, Wash. But this is horse showing, and the show went on.

Rothschild, owned by Beverly and Larry Pollock and ridden by Missy Hicks Myrick, braved the puddles in grand fashion. The 6-year-old West-phalian (Rabano-Muntre Maid) was imported from Germany last year, and this was his first show with Myrick. He strutted away with the show's high score, a 76.38 percent at first level.
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he Equestrians’ Institute Beaujolais Dressage show probably felt a little more like a swim meet than a horse show. Rain left giant puddles in all three rings, June 16-18 in Auburn, Wash. But this is horse showing, and the show went on.

Rothschild, owned by Beverly and Larry Pollock and ridden by Missy Hicks Myrick, braved the puddles in grand fashion. The 6-year-old West-phalian (Rabano-Muntre Maid) was imported from Germany last year, and this was his first show with Myrick. He strutted away with the show’s high score, a 76.38 percent at first level.

The 16.3-hand dark chestnut is his owners’ first horse, and they were very proud of him, especially since Beverly hopes to show him herself next year. “They were so excited,” Myrick said. “They did all the background for the show.”

Even though he “tip-toed through the water,” Rothschild made great strides in his training at the show. “He did some of the best work he’s done,” Myrick said, citing stronger impulsion and a truer understanding of lengthening, with scores of 8s and 9s on his canter lengthening.

“It was like it dawned on him, ‘Oh, I get it!’ ” Myrick said with a chuckle.

Rothschild also scored 70.00 percent to win another first level test. His score sheet included favorable comments such as “elegant horse” and “shows power.”

Myrick was most thrilled with how happy and willing Rothschild was, however. “He just did his job and really seemed to enjoy himself,” she said proudly.

Like Rothschild, Myrick’s second mount, Eddy’s Magic, a black, 16.3-hand Trakehner (Guter Stern-Ellena) was showing with Myrick for the first time in Auburn. He earned 67.75 percent to win his Prix St. Georges test and 62.37 percent for second place in his FEI test of choice class.

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Eddy’s Magic, a 15-year-old who has already schooled above Prix St. Georges, was imported March 1 for owner Joy Vartanian. She was looking to replace a mare she’d had for nine years and lost last fall. While looking at Eddy’s Magic in Europe, Vartanian said his name was a good omen, since her late sister’s nickname was Eddie.

“He’s just like a gift from heaven,” said Vartanian, who hopes he will teach her so she can move up the levels. “It’s just magical.”

Eddy’s Magic has also cast a healing spell on his trainer. Several years ago, Myrick, a certified U.S. Dressage Federation instructor, suffered a neck injury and was unable to ride for a year. This show was her first competition since her injury. The Trakehner mare she rode at the time was put on sabbatical until Myrick was healthy again but died only 21�2 weeks before the Equestrians’ Institute show.

Vartanian allowed Myrick to use Eddy’s Magic, whose personality is very similar to Myrick’s previous horse. His scores at Equestrians’ Institute, combined with two scores she’d acquired with her previous horse, earned Myrick her USDF Silver Medal, and she hopes to use Eddy’s Magic to work toward her gold medal, as well.

“He is willing and has a great work ethic,” Myrick said. “We feel very happy to have him. The test had such a nice flow. He really wants to be someone’s partner. It’s so much fun to ride one like that.”

Lindsey Anderson also used Equestrians’ Institute to return to showing after a long break. She took last year off to have a baby, a daughter now 9 months old. But the time off didn’t hurt her–she and Intrepid scored 66.22 percent to win an FEI test of choice by more than 6 points. Although Anderson was riding again only 10 days after her daughter’s birth, she had not competed since her lay-off.

The pair had a somewhat rocky warm-up and first day. Anderson described Intrepid as “the class clown. If he can figure out how to get away with something, he will. He was looking for excuses to play the first day.”

By Sunday, though, the two were settled back into routine.

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The 15-year-old, 16.1-hand Dutch Warmblood was imported from the Nether-lands as a 3-year-old, picked by Olympian Robert Dover, and Anderson has owned him for nearly six years. She competed in the North American Young Riders Championships with him in 2002, ’03 and ’04.

Intrepid is the first horse Anderson has trained to this level, so she works with Roxanne Christiansen to improve his piaffe and passage. And the extra help was worth it–Intrepid earned 8s on his extensions, piaffe, passage, and transitions, displaying his power. Anderson hopes to bring out that power more next year, aiming for the 2007 Brentina Cup at the USET Foundation Dressage Festival of Champions (N.J.).

Experience paid off for Natalie Perry and Rubina in the FEI Young Rider classes. The pair earned winning scores of 68.00 percent in the Team Test and 64.37 percent in the Prix St. Georges and placed second (67.50%) in the freestyle.

Perry has owned Rubina for about four years. They started at second and third levels and moved up to the young rider division last year.

The 15-year-old, Westphalian mare, by Royal Angelo I, has done well at this show in the past, but Perry’s routine changed this year. She had to attend her brother’s graduation the night before the horse show, so she didn’t get much sleep. “I just got up and went out and rode her [with little preparation],” Perry said.

Like Rothschild, Rubina made significant progress during her tests. Perry said the lighter sand footing helped the mare. Being lucky enough to perform her tests in the indoor arena was another blessing. Although Perry did not think the standing water would have been a problem for Rubina, she did appreciate the cooler location for her freestyle. The indoor setting also gave the mare a little extra sparkle and animation.

“She felt really good,” Perry said. “Very beneath me and with me.”

Perry was especially glad for that sparkle in her mare’s attitude, having seen her change over the years. “When I first got her, she was very depressed,” she stated. “She would stand with her head in the corner of her stall and wouldn’t really play when turned out. Now, she’s a much happier horse and really enjoys going to work.”

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