Saturday, May. 25, 2024

Coffin Bone Fractures Common In Warmblood Foals

A recent study conducted by the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine found that coffin bone fractures in warmblood foals are extremely common according to the Horse.

In fact, all 20 of the foals in the study displayed fractures in their first year, with a total number of 61 fractures recorded. All foals in the study were from one farm and during one season.  

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A recent study conducted by the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine found that coffin bone fractures in warmblood foals are extremely common according to the Horse.

In fact, all 20 of the foals in the study displayed fractures in their first year, with a total number of 61 fractures recorded. All foals in the study were from one farm and during one season.  

These fractures occur within the palmar processes of the coffin bone, narrow extensions of bone that project rearward. The fractures can occur for a variety of reasons including: pull on the bone from the deep digital flexor tendon, weight increase and concussion.

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Of the 20 foals in the study, nine had large, medium and/or small fractures, seven had medium and/or small fractures, and four had small fractures only. Sixteen foals had fractures in both forefeet, all had medial (inside) fractures on at least one foot, 18 had lateral (outside) fractures, and nine had both medial and lateral fractures in both forefeet. Small fractures tended to show up later, at an average of 4.2 months of age, while the larger fractured occurred at an average of 2.6 months of age.

The foals remained sound and were given no treatment aside from regular trimming of the feet. Fractures healed without complication between a period of three to six months, depending upon the severity of the break.

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