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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2006
    Location
    Kansas
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    1,182

    Default Problems Already.

    Sheza got back yesterday and I let her settle all day, then decided tonight to just lunge her to get some energy out... Lets just say it didn't go well.
    She started off great and after 8 or so circles turned into me and charged at me, I did back away but I got her back out and moving, then brought her back in once she did a few more laps. As I sent her out again she charged at me, I tried a few times more but every time was the same and I gave up because it wasn't worth getting hurt over.
    I then turned her out and she took off running and tried to go between three trees in a triangle shape and fell and slid about into another tree, so I went to check on her and she wouldn't let me get near her, at one point I was close to her and she charged at me in the middle of the pasture, I ended up having to jump a small creek and get behind a tree to get out of her way.
    I don't know what to do anymore with her, I can't trust her. I love her so I want to try everything I can before selling her. One minute she is following me around like a puppy dog and the next minute she is charging at me. I wish she would do it at the barn so my trainer could see what she is doing.
    I am going to talk to my trainer and probably take her in again for a private lesson.
    I can't think of anything pain wise which would cause her to do this, she just doesn't respect me but I am not going to take a chance standing up to her.
    -Lindsey



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    15,292

    Default

    why are you lunging this mare when you cant lunge properly
    this isnt the mares fault ---
    dont get angry with her -- you are as king her to do something that you arnt doing properly --

    dont lunge her until you have been to tuaght to do it in the correct manner

    ask your trianer to come to you and teach you how to do it
    inthe manner it should be done and safetly
    theres nothing wrong with your horses its the handler

    dont ever take it out on them -- you ask they do remember that



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2006
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by goeslikestink View Post
    why are you lunging this mare when you cant lunge properly
    this isnt the mares fault ---
    dont get angry with her -- you are as king her to do something that you arnt doing properly --

    dont lunge her until you have been to tuaght to do it in the correct manner

    ask your trianer to come to you and teach you how to do it
    inthe manner it should be done and safetly
    theres nothing wrong with your horses its the handler

    dont ever take it out on them -- you ask they do remember that
    GLS, I worked with my trainer for an hour on properly lunging her. I don't think it's me this time.
    -Lindsey



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 16, 2005
    Location
    Sergeantsville, NJ and South Hadley, MA
    Posts
    948

    Default

    Honestly? If you feel that you can't trust her, I would talk to your trainer about selling her. As much as I'm sure you love her, sometimes it just isn't worth it. Or, if you decide to continue working with her and the trainer, give yourself some goals. For example, promise yourself that if you cannot safely handle her within two months, then you will talk to your trainer about selling her. Also, ask your trainer to teach you how to longe her properly.

    Please do not handle her unless there is someone keeping an eye on you. It sounds as if you have a real reason to be concerned about your safety.
    http://s21.photobucket.com/albums/b2...ncer/?start=20

    Mares are like neutrons. If there are too many in an area, you approach critical mass. And then there are explosions. Loud ones.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    2,547

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ~DressageJunkie~ View Post
    GLS, I worked with my trainer for an hour on properly lunging her. I don't think it's me this time.
    DJ a 'one hour' lesson is not going to teach you how to do something perfectly nor will it teach you everything that you can know about thing.

    Give the mare a few days off to adjust to being back in her home and then attempt working with her again. That's my advice.
    *The Quietman ~ Irish Approved Gr.1 Stallion
    www.windyislesfarms.com
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2006
    Posts
    718

    Default

    I've watched you with Sheza with interest. I'm sorry that "training" didn't work out. I would have liked to see you there with lessons for the summer. Is there any possible way that you can do that? Sheza is not a bad horse I really think you guys just need some direction. how's her feed? Sounds like she maybe a little jacked up on feed. Saddlebreds are by nature a hot horse and need minimal amount of grain and plenty of hay. Working with a horse is 80% in your head and 20% with the horse. Think long and hard about what you could have done to out smart this horse. She's smart - she got out of working for the day, now how smart are you? I also think maybe under some direction (even 4-h) you should start with ground manners and make her behave first there. Getting her to move away from you on a lead line (back end, front end, backing) that kind of thing. She doesn't respect you or a whip if she's charging you. Too I think you need to spend alot of time working with your trainer and watching her work this horse with her teaching you how to handle her. Don't get discouraged we all started exactly where you are and learned along the way, big thing is ask for help before you get hurt!

    Goodluck!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    4,189

    Default

    That really sucks, DJ. I agree with everything that everyone else has said. With having the horse at home and having non- horsey parents, it does not sound to me like a safe situation for you to be working her without your trainer there on the property with you. As GLS said, trying to lunge her is simply not going to work until you really know what you are doing and it takes much longer than one hour to build the confidence in your skills to address a problem like charging. I am really sorry that the training does not appear to have resolved all of your issues. I am not slamming you at all, but it should be clear to you now that the issue in the equation is you not Sheza. If she was fine for her month of training but turned immediately back into a handful when she got home, you do not have what is going to take right now to deal with her. Please, please do not take that as an insult, I am trully not trying to put you down. There are few 13/14 year olds in the world that have the skills to deal with a horse like her. By the way, is she pinning her ears at you when she charges? At this point, I think that either keeping her at the barn where she was trained so that you have professional backup for when a problem arises or selling her are the only really good options you have. (By keeping her there, I do not mean keeping her in training, I mean just being a boarder for a while so that there is help there for you when you do work with her.) Whatever you decide, good luck and be careful.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2005
    Posts
    2,060

    Default

    A lot of the problem could be that you still need "training." You are still green when it comes to horses and adding a green horse to the mixture is bound to cause problems.

    You don't have the skills to lunge a horse properly, especially a green horse. A one hour lesson isn't enough. So it's best not to do it right now until you both have more training.

    Is there anyway you two can get training together? That may be helpful, too, since you'd learn the correct things to do while she gets the training. Or, you may be better off selling her and getting a horse that is more suited for you since you don't have the knowledge and experience to deal with a green horse. Good luck with whatever you do!
    ***Honorary Member of the "What is BOSS?" Cult...er...CLIQUE***
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    CrayolaPosse ~ Bluegreen



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2006
    Posts
    182

    Default Your problem is obvious

    Quote Originally Posted by ~DressageJunkie~ View Post
    she just doesn't respect me but I am not going to take a chance standing up to her.
    You have to, or you will get hurt. Either become the alpha mare or sell her.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    Northern New Jersey
    Posts
    2,474

    Default

    I'm with Caroline- you can't teach this mare what you don't yet know. You may be better off selling her and getting a horse that can teach you. A lack of trust on both sides will only grow like the Grand Canyon between a green horse and green rider unless you are under the constant and watchful eye of a trainer.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2002
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    11,643

    Default

    Guys, DJ is a child and it would be best if she learned training methods from someone in person then over the internet and doing them alone.

    DJ, how long was she at the trainer and what did she learn there?



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2006
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    She was there a month, and she was worked with on just about everything from ground work to jumping.
    -Lindsey



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 16, 2005
    Posts
    6,769

    Default

    I have also followed your stories too.

    This is JMHO. I'd sell her. I know you love her but I think it's in both of your best interests. I had a mare that I had issues with and it just wasn't worth either of us getting hurt. So I found her a new home.

    Good luck!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2006
    Posts
    1,902

    Default

    Obviously, she knows you are scared of her. This is a very bad situation. You either have to get the upper hand (which from the way its sounds this is highly unlikely without getting hurt) or sell her, I agree. You think she doesn't respect you now, a disaster is in the making once you are in the saddle.

    What happened at the trainers. Has she always been this aggressive and disrespectful?

    Ever heard the saying Green on Green = Black and Blue? This is very true.
    *** 4 More Years ***
    *** 4 More Years ***



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 1999
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    6,221

    Default

    Do yourself and the mare a favor- sell her.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2006
    Posts
    132

    Default

    Please think about selling her... it sounds like despite your and your trainers efforts, you and your mare are just not 'meant for each other'. Sometimes no amount of training will make a horse and rider partnership work. I think you would both be better off with different 'partners'....You deserve to have a partner who you can trust and learn from, and so does she.
    I would hate to see you or your mare get hurt. Please be careful.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 22, 2004
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,163

    Default

    I haven't followed this thread, but am sympathetic. I would recommend finding her a new home. It's not worth getting hurt over or continuing to spend money on something that may not get better with time, since you two have a history. Good luck, and be safe.
    Platinum Equestrian - Florida, USA



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2006
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dalfan View Post
    Obviously, she knows you are scared of her. This is a very bad situation. You either have to get the upper hand (which from the way its sounds this is highly unlikely without getting hurt) or sell her, I agree. You think she doesn't respect you now, a disaster is in the making once you are in the saddle.

    What happened at the trainers. Has she always been this aggressive and disrespectful?

    Ever heard the saying Green on Green = Black and Blue? This is very true.
    She has never been wonderful on the ground, but it has gotten worse. She used to be a pro at lunging and this just started a few months before I sent her to training.

    She is an angle in the saddle, she has never offered to buck or anything while I am riding her.

    We were doing great, she has come a long way since when I got her, but I don't know what her problem is now. She was fine with the way I lunged her for over a year, then started charging. I am thinking about seeing if I can have her old owner come out, she is the one that actually trained Sheza.

    I just can't see myself selling her, but not only would it get rid of the green horse problem, I could get something that I could actually show on.
    -Lindsey



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2003
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    693

    Default

    I had a lovely hol/tb cross colt that I adored. He was an absolute angel for everyone... except me. Whenever I would try to work with him he was rear and strike at me or kick out at me with the hind legs. People said he was treating me like his mother, I'm not so sure. In any case it scared me and he knew it so it got worse. Once a horse KNOWS you are scared it has the upper hand and you're done. I really didn't want to but I recognized that it was in both our best interests to sell him and move on. He went to a lovely 4H home and is doing great and I'm happy for him. It was sad to see him go, but it was the right thing. Unless you are ready to go to a boarding stable and work intensively with a trainer you should seriously consider selling her for both your sakes. Good luck with this.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2001
    Location
    NE Pa
    Posts
    1,243

    Default

    I haven't followed this so forgive me if this has been suggested already. Have you looked into hormonal problems? It surely sounds as if this could possibly be an issue.



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