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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 1999
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    Default Anti-racing in the wake of Barbaro's death?

    It is disappointing that racing foes see the death of Barbaro - far away from the track - as an opportunity to peddle their "racing is evil" message. Example -

    (NJ) Courier-Post "Barbaro's story offers different lesson" Jan 30, 2007

    This is the dark side of this thing we call "The Sport of Kings." It is a harsh and horrible reality, and it should keep us from referring to Barbaro as unlucky. In fact, Barbaro was extraordinarily lucky -- a skilled and tireless medical team at the New Bolton Center worked heroically for Barbaro, he lived 254 days with an absolutely catastrophic injury, he was wonderfully cared for and passed away as peacefully and humanely as possible.

    The simple truth is that most injured horses do not get this treatment. Horse Illustrated magazine reported that 90 percent of all horses end up slaughtered -- not euthanized humanely, surrounded by caring people and Internet prayers, but slaughtered and turned into food overseas. Former Kentucky Derby winner Ferdinand, unsuccessful at stud, died last year in Japan in a slaughterhouse according to Blood Horse magazine.

    "Horses are just pawns in a multi-billion dollar industry, expendable commodities that are abandoned when they are no longer profitable."

    PETA's official position is that horse racing should be banned, because the spectacle of rich people racing their animals for sport is barbaric.

    The reality is that horse racing isn't going away. So, indeed, hopefully Barbaro's legacy is not one of sadness. Hopefully something positive comes from all this -- that people in horse racing, from those who run this industry to those who cover it and follow it, become more concerned with the safety of the horses.

    That means better turf, safer surfaces (some tracks are exploring PolyTrack, a new synthetic surface). That means changing the schedule -- the Triple Crown is three punishing races in five weeks, a grueling schedule under any circumstances.

    All sports have risk. Boxing is dangerous, racing cars is dangerous. The difference is that human beings make a choice. The horse runs because the jockey hits it.

    The risks of horse racing are obvious; glaringly so. For some, Barbaro brought them home and made them real. And hopefully now is the time to stop shielding the crowd from the awful sights. Reach Kevin Roberts at kroberts@courierpostonline.com
    HI claims 90% slaughter rate? That is utterly nonsense. And horses don't run only because a jockey uses a whip - I have seen many races where the horse won wire to wire without a whip ever even used. I guess you just can't convince some people of the danger in their logic either. If racing ended and jumping I assume is evil too (per PETA) then at the end of the day TB horses have no value in life other then costly companions. Perhaps they think they should just run free across the "plains of New Jersey"?



  2. #2
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    Jan. 6, 2007
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    Default

    People where going to say a lot about Barbaro when he broke down - you were damned if you do, damned if you don't.

    I think Barbaro shows the world that people in racing truly care about and love their horses -


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
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    Middle of Nowhere, take a right, FL
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    Default

    Heck not even 90% of TBs are slaughtered. It generally works out to be about 20-25% of each foal crop. But as to all horses its a drop in the bucket, less than 1% by most estimates. About 10% of horse deaths are due to slaughter each year.

    TBs love to run. They may not run fast enough for their owners but they LOVE TO RUN. Ask anyone who has been run away with by a fresh TB! =)
    Every mighty oak was once a nut that stood its ground.

    Proud Closet Canterer! Member Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.



  4. #4
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    Mar. 10, 2006
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Glimmerglass View Post
    It is disappointing that racing foes see the death of Barbaro - far away from the track - as an opportunity to peddle their "racing is evil" message. Example -

    (NJ) Courier-Post "Barbaro's story offers different lesson" Jan 30, 2007



    HI claims 90% slaughter rate?
    I think I can safely claim that 90% of Mr Kevin Roberts journalistic output is unmitigated garbage. That's being conservative.



  5. #5
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    Jul. 21, 2006
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    South Carolina
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    5,109

    Default

    It is disappointing that racing foes see the death of Barbaro - far away from the track - as an opportunity to peddle their "racing is evil" message.
    Ok, I wouldn't believe PETA, or those who quote them, no matter what subject they were on about. And I don't mean to start anything, especially not so soon after the sad passing of a wonderful animal. But by "far away from the track" are you suggesting that a racing injury was not the cause of Barbaro's death?



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2003
    Location
    Austin, TX
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    Default E-mail I sent to author of article.

    I am sure the only reason Barbaro was running that day was for this reason: The horse runs because the jockey hits it.

    Get real. They run because they love it. Most ex-racehorses find great homes at the end of their racing careers or before they even race. To think that 90% of horses are sent to slaughter houses is uneducated and a problem that is being addressed even now in congress with the anti-slaughter bills. That being said you should also quote PETA on their belief that dog shows are horrible, and encourage people to buy an animal.

    ----------

    E-mail I sent to the author of this article. I just get so tired of people just slamming something for no other reason than because they can. We really beat our horses to get them to do what we want? Okay, I know that some do, but not the majority I am sure.
    ~ Kimberlee
    www.SpunkyDiva.com



  7. #7
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    Dec. 21, 2002
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    northeast, ohio
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    Default

    heres what I just emailed this closed minded moron....

    You need to get your facts straight about horse racing before you go running off at the pen like you do! If you would like a little education ...or at least get some honest answers ...contact me. I was a rider for 13 yrs and now am an active breeder and owner(and no Im not rich...like your article states ALL racing owners are!). I also help reschool and find homes for many USEFUL retired Thoroughbreds. 90% of all horses do not end up in slaughter horses...certainly not 90% of all racehorses. Get your facts straight!
    To love a Thoroughbred is to truely live and enjoy life. www.horsepowercompany.com



  8. #8
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    Oct. 2, 2004
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    Default

    I have a question regarding this. I ride on the hunter/jumper circuit but am a racing fan - I love watching them run and love the thoroughbreds. And I was rooting 100% for Barbaro and have no doubt he received the best care possible throughout his entire short life.

    However, as the owner of an OTTB, I saw the condition my horse came off the track in. He never placed in a race. I got him just weeks after his last race, and he was so body sore and stiff he could hardly turn around in his stall. He had a 3" gash on his head that should have been stitched but never was and a popped splint. And he was terrified of people and any sudden movement. Six years later, he's sound as can be and a sweetheart, but it made me sad how he was treated - is it different with the lower level racing? Now I understand that it happens in ALL divisions - people can be mean. I am just asking - do people who live and breath the racing industry honestly think racing, overall, is more, less or the same as far as treatment of the horse than other equestrian disciplines?

    But I do agree - those comments are just ridiculous. Anyone who's ever owned or sat on a Thoroughbred know they LOVE to run!!



  9. #9
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    Feb. 8, 2003
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    Austin, TX
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    Default

    "They raised $1.2 million for the Barbaro Fund (even though the owners, Roy and Gretchen Jackson, likely could have afforded to care for the horse without public help)."


    He put in this in the article too. Talk about a lack of checking your facts!
    ~ Kimberlee
    www.SpunkyDiva.com


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
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    Feb. 8, 2003
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    Austin, TX
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    Red face

    Okay now I know for sure how upset that article got me. I registered with the paper so that I could post on the comments part of the article re the facts about the Barbaro Fund. LOL Okay, deep breath, and getting back to work now.
    ~ Kimberlee
    www.SpunkyDiva.com



  11. #11
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    May. 21, 2004
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    N. TX...just N.East of paradise...
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    Default

    Ooohhh....that ticks me off. I just sent the so-called 'journalist' an email, dumb butt so-and-so....doesn't even take time to research for truth.
    "As a rule we disbelieve all the facts and theories for which we have no use."- William James
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Proud member of the Wheat Loss Clique.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2007
    Posts
    861

    Default

    I really would not get worked up by this - we know a lot more than this author who obviously has an agenda. The world saw Barbaro win the Derbyby 6 1/2 lengths without being hit, we know the Jacksons paid for all of his care, and he raised a lot more than the $1.2M noted.

    PinkPonies - unfortunately there are some people involved in racing (attracted via gambling) that really should not be there. It seems your horse had an unfortunate encounter with one. My experience in racing is that the horses are incredibly well care for, and I think you will find this with the majority of trainers/owners.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2003
    Posts
    262

    Default Horse Racing

    It will take many years for me to overcome the tragedy of Barbaro, but with the Preakness, I have watched my last race. It is purely for man's profit that these magnificent, fragile creatures are pushed beyond their limit. George Vecsey ("Racing Can't Afford More Tragedies," The Times, June 6) asks when animal rights' groups are going to speak out against this human (not humane) narcissism. I ask the same question and mourn the loss of Barbaro.


    ******

    Up until last Saturday (Day of Eclipse Awards), The Jackson's had not received a bill for 1 cent.

    MY OPINION of racing is that it's barberic ... my love for horses is endless, I worship the ground they rear on ...

    If you're going to comment or critisize ANYTHING I posted, please be sure you understand what I said first. Honestly, I don't care what any of you say or think ... this is my opinion, I'm entitled and so are others.



  14. #14
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    Nov. 26, 2006
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    Default

    I come from a hunter/jumper barn and have a question for you people involved in the racing world...i love the sport and think it is exilherating to watch (especially live) and i myself would even be interested in getting involved, but i have wondred this....

    could the majority of bone injuries and other leg injuries result from young horses being started to soon? is a lack of full development causing these injuries to occur more often? Also, why do they start the horses at this age? Is there a reason that they can't start them all at a slightly older age?

    please know that i am not in anyway trying to make a stab at the sport, and am just curious if this has been researched at all. and i know these occur in other sports as well
    ~*Little Miss Sunshine*~
    aka Superfreak, Sammie, Samantha, and The Pants



  15. #15
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    Mar. 10, 2006
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    Default

    Glimmer..... you have the power...... lock it while you can.
    This is going to go south real fast.

    Use the force, use it wisely.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    May. 13, 2001
    Location
    Lincolnton, NC
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    465

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CrUsHpOnY View Post
    I come from a hunter/jumper barn and have a question for you people involved in the racing world...i love the sport and think it is exilherating to watch (especially live) and i myself would even be interested in getting involved, but i have wondred this....

    could the majority of bone injuries and other leg injuries result from young horses being started to soon? is a lack of full development causing these injuries to occur more often? Also, why do they start the horses at this age? Is there a reason that they can't start them all at a slightly older age?

    please know that i am not in anyway trying to make a stab at the sport, and am just curious if this has been researched at all. and i know these occur in other sports as well
    It's been researched ad nauseum and the general consensus is that racehorses need the stress of early age training to condition their skeletal systems for the rigors of racing.



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by On the Farm View Post
    It's been researched ad nauseum and the general consensus is that racehorses need the stress of early age training to condition their skeletal systems for the rigors of racing.
    Thanks for your response and answe That makes a little more sense to me now.
    ~*Little Miss Sunshine*~
    aka Superfreak, Sammie, Samantha, and The Pants



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mareseatoats View Post
    It will take many years for me to overcome the tragedy of Barbaro, but with the Preakness, I have watched my last race. It is purely for man's profit that these magnificent, fragile creatures are pushed beyond their limit. George Vecsey ("Racing Can't Afford More Tragedies," The Times, June 6) asks when animal rights' groups are going to speak out against this human (not humane) narcissism. I ask the same question and mourn the loss of Barbaro.


    ******

    Up until last Saturday (Day of Eclipse Awards), The Jackson's had not received a bill for 1 cent.

    MY OPINION of racing is that it's barberic ... my love for horses is endless, I worship the ground they rear on ...

    If you're going to comment or critisize ANYTHING I posted, please be sure you understand what I said first. Honestly, I don't care what any of you say or think ... this is my opinion, I'm entitled and so are others.
    Good post. I have no interest in any kind of anti-racing campaign, but I will say that I don't watch nor support horse racing at all. Our OTTB was broken down with arthritis, ringbone, shin splints, and knee problems by early middle age. She raced for 5 years, had 40 starts. I watched that gorgeous mare deteriorate and turn into an old cripple by age 10. Yeah, racing people will tell you that galloping yearlings is harmless, but it's not. Racing is very hard on the bones, knees particularly. We've had at least three vets tell us that our mare's problems are directly caused by her 5 years on the track. Racing vets are likely to tell you something different, as they're obviously biased toward what they do. I've said it before, and I'll say it again, and it will go over like a terd in the punch bowl (again....), but normal horse people come along and pick up the pieces after the racing world. Normal horse people travel the auction yards and Canter sites looking for an OTTB to rescue. We are the ones who deal with the re-training, and the health issues. The mental issues. The racing people try to downplay it, but rehabbing OTTBs is very serious business. It took our mare several years before she could wear a bit without lolling her tongue out and breaking out in a nervous sweat at the thought of riding.

    Could it be that she had 40 starts at the bigger race tracks like Hollywood Park, Del Mar and Santa Anita? I don't know. But she was a mental basket case. Five years of racing and the damage was done. Mental and physical. She was a good broodmare but only had 3 babies before she was too broken down to carry another one. It's a shame.

    I personally feel that the racing world does no favors for the horse world in general. But that's my personal opinion. We're all entitled to that. The breakdown of Ruffian and the breakdown of Barbaro is too much for me. It broke my heart a million times to see what that poor colt went through and I hope to heavens I never have to see anything like that again in my lifetime.
    Last edited by Auventera Two; Jan. 31, 2007 at 09:52 AM.



  19. #19
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CrUsHpOnY View Post
    Thanks for your response and answe That makes a little more sense to me now.

    Google "Maryland Shin Project". That's a pretty good primer on some of the theory on tb bone development.



  20. #20

    Wink

    I have owned and loved five OTTBs. The one I have now came from a small TB farm in Ocala. His owners had some financial woes and just never got around to breaking him. He is an awsome hunter.
    Many writers and reporters simply do not understand the horse world. The editorial we are discussing reflects that. I think most everyone would agree that whereas racing can be dangerous, so can hunting, barrel racing, and cart pulling. I'll bet if Barbaro could have spoken for himself, he would have said, "I want to run, and furthermore, I want to win." and win he did, right up until his last breath. I feel sorry for the people who will try to turn his death into some lesson to be learned. The only lesson I see is how much people can love their animals and how huge the heart of Barbaro was. More people should try to be like him.
    "Horse sense is what a horse has that keeps him from betting on people".



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