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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,260

    Default How Have Your Horses or Pets Taken Years Off Your Life?

    For me, there was the time my two minis got loose in the trailer, opened the access door and hopped out at about 25 mph. Or the day my dog jumped up on the gas stove knobs and set the kitchen wall on fire. Or when my mare came down with WNV and was saved by physically lifting her to her feet every time she went down, despite the vet's recommendations to euthanize her when she couldn't rise on her own. We did that for eight days (along with vet treatment, of course) until she recovered enough to get up on her own. Vet told me he never expected her to survive, especially without permanent neuro damage.

    How about you?
    "Dogs give and give and give. Cats are the gift that keeps on grifting." –Bradley Trevor Greive


    4 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 13, 2008
    Location
    Western MA
    Posts
    656

    Default

    My cat once bit into and swallowed a glass Christmas tree light which was on the tree and lit at the time. Cue heart attack.

    And my mare has had any number of serious injuries (torn suspensory, massive melanoma that the vet suspected was causing pain and lameness, etc.) but I think that when she came down with Cushings and lost 200 pounds before we figured out what it was, that was probably the most stressful medical time/issue.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
    Posts
    11,809

    Default

    #1-When my aged TB was recovering from an abcess that caused him to slough half his sole (vet said it looked like a resection) he went flat out in the pasture one sunny day.
    Yes, I understand it probably took weight off the sore foot & the other 3 picking up the slack.
    But when I called his name & he didn't move & his buddy standing guard did not either....
    With sinking heart I approached, calling his name & was practically on top of him, when he raised his head sleepily, looked at me like "WTF?", then grudgingly got to his feet.

    #2-TB & aforementioned buddy were standing in the field as I drove home from work.
    Normally the 2 of them would see my car, then head to the barn as dinner was imminent.
    When I was changing from work clothes & peeped out my window, I saw the buddy still standing by the fenceline. Traitor TB had abandoned him.
    Raced to the pasture & found somehow horse had put his hoof through the wires holding the corner post. Several piles of manure proved he'd been there for a while. Foot was wedged so tight I was afraid if the wire had cut him, getting him loose might start a bleed.
    I managed to work the foot out, TG not a scratch. He took a couple stiff steps, then walked away fine.

    #3-Little bonbon of a barncat once went missing for 3 days in the worst part of Winter. She normally met me for every feeding & then demanded some laptime.
    I was convinced something had gotten her when she showed up as if nothing had happened.

    My chickens routinely scare me by disappearing somewhere on the property (you'd think 6 white hens might stand out in the greenery...), causing me to humiliate myself in front of any listening neighbors, wandering around calling "Chook! Chook!" & rattling their tupperware of sunflower seeds < Chicken Crack
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009, Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009
    Sam(Jaybee Altair) 1994-2015


    3 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 10, 2007
    Location
    SE Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,758

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paige777 View Post
    My cat once bit into and swallowed a glass Christmas tree light which was on the tree and lit at the time. Cue heart attack.
    BTDT, got the t-shirt. My first cat, Leia, who also licked oven cleaner off an oven rack and survived, and also disappeared down the furnace vents, scrabbling around while I sobbed, sure she would be burnt to death or something (I'm still not sure how furnaces work)! Leia lived to be twenty and a half years old, too.

    I left my dog alone in the backyard for half a minute on a cold January night and the little bugger took off. No luck finding him, even though I drove around at 1am, windows down, yelling "Darby! Darby!" This did not do my sore throat and runny nose any good. I put a blanket out on the back porch with no hope, but there he was in the morning, curled up on it!

    My first horse, a true saint of a mare, was tied to a hitching post when an idiot came and set fire to a large pile of rubbish almost directly in front of it. She was very alert, and of course I immediately moved her, but thank God nothing worse happened.

    Had a bad colic a few years ago-- I don't want to talk about that-- still too scary.
    I loff my Quarter horse clique

    I kill threads dead!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 10, 2015
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    312

    Default

    My horse (when I lived in CA) ran through a fence and fell off a 40 foot cliff into an inaccessable canyon. Long, long story. Rescue made the news - took a day to get him out. Happy ending - he was fine. I however was a basket case.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2007
    Location
    Pen Argyl PA
    Posts
    5,882

    Default

    i think it's the other way around for me. Having my animals adds years to my life, reduces stress.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2010
    Posts
    509

    Default

    um, almost hesitate to address this, but 50 years of horse ownership has included caring for my horses on my own farm. When I was younger, I baled hay, stacked it, never though much about it. Horses needed to eat. I built a barn, acres of fencing, arenas, dressage rings, stalls, jumps. Then I dragged those jumps around the field for the horses and kids for 30 years. I'm a twin. My sister lives a quiet life involving sewing and cats. The result of my heavy physical labor in my life has been both knees replaced, hip replaced, and shoulder rebuilt. Sis (my twin) had an ingrown toenail removed. Had I my life to live over again, I would buy better equipment to move heavy loads (I wish I'd had a skid loader to move those jumps!), a manure spreader, bigger tractor and hired someone to bale and stack the hay. I wouldn't have had to have my old worn out joints replaced if I'd worked smarter instead of harder.


    11 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Round Hill, VA
    Posts
    15,043

    Default

    I have fabulous orange tabbies that are brothers. They are, as orange cats tend to be, total hooligans but too endearing to stay mad at. They are semi Instagram famous because they go for walks with the dogs and people love the pictures. ANYHOO, I had had them about 3 months or so (got them when they were about a year old). I am anti cats on the counter, and we were still working out negotiations about that. One day, I opened the door the to the house and thought "hmmm....what is that very familiar noise? I can't quite place it......and why does it smell funny in here??" Then it slowly dawned on me. SOMEONE had been on the cooktop- the GAS cooktop- and had somehow managed to light, full flame, three of the gas burners. The noise I heard was the fourth one on "Light" clicking away, filling the house with gas. I quickly turned the stove off, turned the house fan on, threw open all the doors and windows, and kicked everyone outside for a couple of hours (it was February. Thanks, guys). I noticed that one of the boys had singed whiskers. I figured out who the culprit was!

    I have to say, while we STILL argue about the counters, he DOES stay off cooktops now.

    As for HORSES, well....the BO had this FABULOUS pony for his son that everyone adored. I, particularly, loved him, and had competed him and hunted him. Such a cool guy. One day, our groom came in and said that the pony's hind legs were covered in blood. Oh no! I assumed it was a cut or something. I went out, and found his backside SOAKED with blood. I quickly brought him and called the vet before I even got a good look. I was describing to her what I was seeing while I examined him with her on the phone, and she was breaking traffic laws to get to us. From the looks of it, I thought this pony had had some massive internal rupture and was bleeding out from his anus. And then, I saw it. A HUGE, deep gash, on the underside of his dock, way up to where his tail met his haunches. You could stick your finger up past the first knuckle into it and it was probably 3 or 4 inches long. Probably the strangest wound we had every seen! We have no idea how he did it, our only guess was that his full sized companion had a well aimed kick that caught him just the right way.

    Not necessarily a life shortener, but my dog once got stepped on and it cracked her toe nail, allowing e.coli to get up into her foot. She got a serious infection that hurt like a sonofabitch and made her feel like crap. That was fun to treat.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    20,080

    Default

    The time I was on a slippery road in 4x4 and slid off the road into a swale.
    Trailer was at a 45 decree slope with my mare inside. She was an angel, so sensible and brave. Got herself out somehow without falling over. Then I had to tie her to a barbed wire fence to tack her up, slip-slide down a steep slippery slope to a ranch house down below to use a phone. My host arrived eventually with a very manly tractor and pulled the trailer and truck out, so my dear mare jumped back in to finish the ride.

    Was so proud of my dear brave TB mare. They are so bold and brave.
    Myself - I had to stay calm and carry on.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique


    8 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 3, 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    3,191

    Default

    About 18 months ago I fed one of my corgis some Natural Balance food rol. She'd eaten it before, but always out of the fridge. This was room temp and a solid portion. Fed it just before I was about to go into an exam room while working small animal ER. Tempi made an odd snort, pushed open the crate door--and then fell over, she had choked and passed out. All in the treatment room of an ER. As I grabbed her--I thought "well, if her heart has stopped, I can likely get it back". My tech held her jaws opened while I reached in and was able to clear her throat on my second pass. She was turning dusky. Someone else was grabbing me a light so I could intubate if I failed. As soon as I cleared her throat, she took a big inhale and promptly became pink. We kept her on mask oxygen for a few minutes. Then she wanted to eat the dinner that had almost killed her since it had landed on the floor. Added a few more grey hairs that night


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2015
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    51

    Default

    The first winter I had my horse, we tried turning him out with the horse I was leasing from the BM. My horse was a submissive 3 y/o at the time and the lease horse was a 20+ TB who was also very submissive. Well we learned the hard way that the submissive older gentleman was tired of being bossed around and wanted to try being the boss to the young guy.

    He chased him away from the hay, but instead of running to the fence and stopping, my young gelding ran through the end of the hotwire fence, got caught in it, turned around, ran through another side of hotwire fence, through another hotwire fence to the next pasture and then ran through ANOTHER hotwire fence to get out of that pasture!!! (sry for the run-on sentence but )

    OMG all I could do was stand there stunned and wait for him to stop. After galloping around some corn fields for a while, he returned and miraculously did not have a scratch on him. How? After going through not one, but 4, hotwire fences?!?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2009
    Location
    Sure to get kicked out of the Bible Belt soon.....
    Posts
    4,270

    Default

    We were 75 ish miles from home after a show. I was driving and we heard a racket in the trailer. Best friend did not look through the window of the escape door and just opened it. Pony jumped out onto the side of the PA turnpike. Freeeeeee out in Amish country.


    Different pony- my 8 year old daughter was jumping at a schooling show. Aimed at the wrong fence for her division. A 3' fence right beside hers. Pony zeroed in on that jump and started galloping to it (she was able to get him over the correct jump thank god).

    Different pony this summer- Trainer "Go jump the middle jump" Kiddo and pony go and jump a coop (wrong jump). Pony has never jumped a coop. Kid has never jumped a coop. Thank god he is game.


    I see most of my posts have a Pony as the central character..... I sense a theme.
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2008
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    8,977

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by yellowbritches View Post
    I have fabulous orange tabbies that are brothers. They are, as orange cats tend to be, total hooligans but too endearing to stay mad at. They are semi Instagram famous because they go for walks with the dogs and people love the pictures. ANYHOO, I had had them about 3 months or so (got them when they were about a year old). I am anti cats on the counter, and we were still working out negotiations about that. One day, I opened the door the to the house and thought "hmmm....what is that very familiar noise? I can't quite place it......and why does it smell funny in here??" Then it slowly dawned on me. SOMEONE had been on the cooktop- the GAS cooktop- and had somehow managed to light, full flame, three of the gas burners. The noise I heard was the fourth one on "Light" clicking away, filling the house with gas. I quickly turned the stove off, turned the house fan on, threw open all the doors and windows, and kicked everyone outside for a couple of hours (it was February. Thanks, guys). I noticed that one of the boys had singed whiskers. I figured out who the culprit was!
    the cat story made me laugh! orange cats are the best though.. we had a similar heart attack, the cat would jump on our old gas stove when we weren't home..she liked to look out the window, which overlooked where we parked. we came home more than once to the click-click-click noise and the seep of propane assaulting our nostrils. said cat is not athletic, so would leap/flounce up and hoist herself up scrabbling with her hind legs and we think that is how she would turn the knobs.

    i had no part of this, but SO did decide to leave the stove on/ignited to low heat, "left the building" (waited outside) and waited for the cat to jump up -- which she did.. and she never did it again after that. she was fine minus a few crisp hairs on her paw and singed whiskers.

    as for the other 'shaved years' stories.. I have many.. but still too PSTD to discuss~!

    I will share a light one; when I was 15 I had a very young (4) very athletic TB. We were hacking one day and the trail is interspersed by a back road; we would stop and wait for oncoming traffic to pass and then go. One day a tractor trailer went by - he was ok but then a motorcycle FLEW by after and revved his engine so loud I felt the ground rumble -- and I was on a horse! Horse understandably lost it, bolted and bucked me off and took off galloping down the road. Sparks flying, skittering, I will never forget seeing those skinny little bay legs go scrabbling across blacktop, each hoofstrike looked like a hammer forge. He went the direction he thought was home, but 'missed his exit' and galloped straight into Route 119, which is a major 45mph route right before a converging highway (495). I don't know how he did not get killed; he should have, that road is back-to-back moving vehicles all hours of the day.

    I was ferried by a man in a minivan who saw the whole thing.. Horse was caught 2 miles down the road by a VERY angry old lady. He was 100% unscathed; I was a mess.

    Then there was the time the entire herd slipped out at 3 AM and frolicked on that very same road, unscathed..
    AETERNUM VALE, INVICTUS - 7/10/2012


    3 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2000
    Location
    Where am I and what am I doing in this handbasket?
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    24,150

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    #1 Loss of Life Expectancy in DMK - quoted from a post in 2015 because typing it again still makes me distinctly ill.

    Yeah, not all cats can get down from trees, although the ones who know how to back down usually can get down, But there are plenty of cats who never have a clue how to do that because they never had an opportunity to learn (and I suppose in the real world there was a selection bias that meant not everyone survived the learning experience).

    If you don't have the "specialists" in general I would call tree trimming/arborist types, although the fire department did tell me they would come out and help if the tree was in the front yard where their bucket would go.

    Oh, you think this sounds like I have some recent experience? Why yes, yes, I do.

    My younger Maine Coon got himself in a panic situation a few months ago, and bolted over the back fence/out of the yard. He then went into full on panic because he wasn't in his yard (long story short - they have a catio, but when I'm out there in the morning, the three cats go outside supervised). He was trying to circle back to his yard, but there were a couple fenced yards between him and safety. By the time he went over the 3rd fence (with me hot on his tail) he was in full blown panic. He's a nutcake, but he's MY nutcake. I managed to find the gate and got in the last small wooded yard and I heard him, but could not see him. Then I looked up.

    https://flic.kr/p/s7t6cH

    *vomit*

    Of course it was Saturday AM so naturally everyone was answering their phones when I called looking for someone to get him down. Not.

    Finally found this wonderful arborist guy who came out right away, he really did do it about as correct as it could be done, but I was pretty sure my panicked nutcake was not going to help himself. Sigh. I was correct.

    Without going into too much detail, because quite frankly, I still get the shakes thinking about it, never mind writing it, he panicked, went up, went on a branch (normally where you can capture cat), leaped to another tree... and then super tree guy leaped as well... then cat when way way way up. Seriously. click on the link. Blow the pic up. Look for the tiny dot of orange. Realize cat is well above tiny dot (human)

    https://flic.kr/p/s9kMZa

    On a branch, attempted to catch cat. Cat bit awesome tree guy, levitated to another branch, lost his balance, fell 85 feet, landed on his side.

    Bounced.

    *vomitous*

    and hit the ground running, bolted over the fence again. By now he was so obviously in shock and in trouble, but hey, he didn't break all 4 legs or his neck, but I figured anything else was fair game due to shock/adrenaline. He rounded the corner towards home, which was also cause for concern because guys were in the garage/driveway cutting tile and I was scared to death what would happen when he saw home and got scared. He then proceeded to climb a pine tree in a copse of trees on the corner. SERIOUSLY? made it about 8 feet up, fell out of the tree, I threw myself on him sobbing. He bit me. Then recognized me. I grabbed him up and ran home, screaming at poor tile guys to be quiet, stand still and found the furthest quietest corner of the house to evaluate him. I've never seen a cat so distressed and in shock, but at least there were no major obvious broken bones. Called vet to tell them I was on the way in.

    They did an ultrasound and x-rays. Clean. Gave him some fluids and a shock dose of steroids, declared him a miracle cat (but a nutcake miracle) and sent him home. He went into a sleep coma for 3 days under my bed (I only slept about 5 minutes because I kept getting up to assure myself he was still breathing), then got up and said, "Hey, what's up? What did I miss?"

    About a week later that animal planet premiered. I still can't even watch the trailers without getting distinctly ill.
    and nutcake MCC is still a nutcake. He's a 17lb rail thin nutcake, I mean RAIL thin, his other name is Skelator. I can get him to eat maybe 1/3 what the other one eats (24lbs and not fat although he would like very much to be).
    Your crazy is showing. You might want to tuck that back in.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May. 13, 2008
    Location
    Western MA
    Posts
    656

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    DMK, oh my God, I can't even imagine! I would have been in hysterics. Bless your awesome tree guy, and holy crud! You have one lucky kitty.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2015
    Location
    Flyover country, tundra, basically southern Canada.
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    157

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    The time the broodmare flipped over in an old hard wooden feed bunk and it took 45 minutes to cut it out from around her.

    The time the big hunter goof kicked a wall and broke a coffin bone.

    The time the same goof (the day after I started riding him again, following rehab for said broken coffin bone) hung himself for an unknown length of time by a front leg from the corner joint of two coral panels, requiring me to cut parts of the panel to free him.

    The time the goofy hunter's little brother got run through the corner of a wood fence where it joined a building, breaking a board away from the vertical, nearly impaling his girth, and getting himself stuck between a horizontal board and the building (nearly requiring me to cut the board to get him out).

    The time the above gelding's full sibling pawed down a trailer window (don't ask, she's super creative and athletic) and subsequently jumped out.

    The time my two year old HUS stallion prospect tripped in a class, face planted, and nearly rotated over on me.

    These are the top of the list, and all horses are happy, healthy, and only a few minor to moderate cosmetic blemishes. Though I have some premature gray hairs, and possibly on the verge of ulcers thanks to these guys. There are obviously some sad stories that are just as time-shaving, but rather not relive those.
    *I have a pinball machine of a mind. I apologize in advance if I leave someone behind. Sometimes I can't even keep up*


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 7, 2013
    Location
    Southern Ontario
    Posts
    908

    Default

    Oh Lord too many to count.

    Most recent total heart attack moment…just brought a new horse home, a big sweety, but a bit pushy for treats… the carrots and the knife and the chopping block are in the main area right by the x-ties. (I am a big believer in chopping up treats so no one chokes). Well Mr. new horse spies the carrot pieces, motors right over there to vacuum them up, and YES, grabs the knife as well. In goes the knife and he's chewing and rolling it around in his mouth. I see carrots being swallowed and he is still rolling and chewing, rather thoughtfully now.

    I am whimpering holding the leadshank. I don't want to just get him home and kill him within a day. No. That would be too cruel.

    He's still chewing and I'm grabbing his lips and tongue to try and wrestle the knife out of there. No go. 17 hands sticks his llama head in the air when I do that. that's definitely worse.

    Eventually I grab a big full size carrot and wave it in front of his face. He lowers his head, out drops the knife and in goes the big carrot.

    Cue collapse from me. He's completely unscathed from it. Just thought it was a very tough carrot I guess.

    I have never ever left the knife again beside the carrots. I chop and put it away. We also improved his ground manners too so he doesn't just motor over and grab.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2012
    Posts
    217

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Foxglove View Post
    um, almost hesitate to address this, but 50 years of horse ownership has included caring for my horses on my own farm. When I was younger, I baled hay, stacked it, never though much about it. Horses needed to eat. I built a barn, acres of fencing, arenas, dressage rings, stalls, jumps. Then I dragged those jumps around the field for the horses and kids for 30 years. I'm a twin. My sister lives a quiet life involving sewing and cats. The result of my heavy physical labor in my life has been both knees replaced, hip replaced, and shoulder rebuilt. Sis (my twin) had an ingrown toenail removed. Had I my life to live over again, I would buy better equipment to move heavy loads (I wish I'd had a skid loader to move those jumps!), a manure spreader, bigger tractor and hired someone to bale and stack the hay. I wouldn't have had to have my old worn out joints replaced if I'd worked smarter instead of harder.
    I bet you had more fun!


    3 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
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    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
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    11,968

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    My mother sold a nice level headed yearling colt to some people who lived nearby. They came in a 1970's style two horse trailer which had pipe chest bars and only a single front window to access horse's heads.
    Colt had never been trailered before but loaded OK and they started down the road. 5 minutes later they were back. Colt was sitting in front of the chest bars with his head out the front hatch.
    ::If I was wrong don't you think I would know it?::


    2 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
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    Jun. 16, 2016
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    28

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    I took on a whippet puppy on Christmas eve. He was 14 weeks old and I was his fourth owner. I stupidly assumed he just needed a good home, decent food and exercise. Boy was I wrong! He is the most diffcult dog I have ever owned and his list of crimes is long! I cried every day for 6 months at the awful things he did. However by far and away the worst was the day he ate a light bulb, although the day he smashed a 100gallon fish tank to pieces is a close second!

    I cant remember the exact circumstances, but I had somehow got a tiny bit of gravy on a light bulb I had to replace one that had blown. I was walking back to the kitchen to wipe it off when he stole it from my hand and then legged it. When I caught up to him he looked me in the eyes and bit down on it shattering the glass, then when I was frantically trying to pick up all the bits proceeded to eat the tiny shards of glass!

    I rang the vets in hysterics and they told me he would either be ok or not and told me the things to watch out for. That was nearly 6yrs ago and the big lummox is still here. He did finally settle down at about 18months old and has been the dog of a lifetime for me. By god was he a difficult puppy and I reckon he aged me 20yrs in 6 months!


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