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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2006
    Location
    nevernever land
    Posts
    921

    Default Going foxhunting for the first time! HELP

    A year ago i was introduced to some people who foxhunt, and i had some interest in it, but assumed it would go nowhere. Well, recently i decided to express that interest and within 24-48 hours of turn around, all of a sudden i have a hunt mount to ride and a hunt to go to on Sunday and i have no clue what i am doing?! Yes i do ride 4-5 days a week, but i have never done foxhunting and need everyone to hold my hand through what i need to buy, wear, do, say, NOT do or say (i already know they are hounds not dogs ). I have never seen or ridden the horse i will be meeting an hour before the hunt meets... what if he is a dirty stopper?! Or doesnt like me and is fussy?! I dont want to hit a solid fence! Should i wear a protection vest my first time out just in case? What happens before, after, and during the hunt? (This group does live hunts, no kill though).

    Help!?!
    ~*PVC JUMPER*~
    Dreams are meant to come true, not free...
    "Everything I do, I do out of fear of being mediocre."



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2006
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    709

    Default

    I just started hunting so i can give you some advice as a fellow newbie...but someone should maybe check my etiquette answers.
    1. www.mfha.com has a great page on about foxhunting.
    2. Basic attire (i'm assuming the horse is properly tacked...) is navy or black jacket, white show shirt with a not pre-tied stock tie with plain gold pin (horizontal), beige breeches, black polished tall boots (dress preferable, but they probably won't care), black helmet (or navy if your coat is navy). CLEAN AND SHINY... YOU AND THE HORSE!!!
    3. Politely introduce yourself to everyone. Make way for everyone you see. If you see someone in a pinque coat (red! :-P) get out of their way ASAP. Men can wear them, but so do the hunt masters, whippers-in, and huntsman. Basically, just an easy rule of thumb. If you see a hound or a whippers-in you call "hound please" or "whip please". If you see a hole you call " 'ware hole". basically the please are for something not-dangerous but that you need to be alerted to. The 'ware is from beware and it means you really have to watch out.
    4. Frankly, you should just ride him as confidently as possible. If you think he's going to be a dirty stopper...HE WILL. If you keep your leg on and tell him that 'yes he really can jump this'... HE WILL.
    5. It really depends on the hunt how strict they are with attire. My hunt is more than happy for you to wear a protective vest....but the most traditional ones frown upon it.
    6. There are 2 fields that follow the fox: 1st and 2nd. The first is the closest behind the huntsman and jumps. The second is non-jumpers, slightly slower paced. I feel more comfortable in second field until i get used to hunting, but if you feel confident i dont' see why you couldn't join first field.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2006
    Location
    Hunt Valley, MD
    Posts
    2,094

    Default

    Ok, don't fret! You'll do fine! Usually a foxhunter won't put you up on anything that is a dirty stopper or one that is unsafe.

    These links are from our hunts website:

    Regarding what to do: http://www.hcibhounds.com/protocol.htm
    Regarding what to wear: http://www.hcibhounds.com/appoint.htm

    You are going to want to dress in Formal Hunt attire, which is described on the above website. Basically it is black/navy coat, buff/beige/canary breeches, white shirt, white stock tie with plain stock pin fastened horizontally, canary/tattersall vest, brown/natural colored gloves, dress boots, and a black/navy (preferably velvet) helmet. If you are comfortable wearing spurs and not using them incorrectly, and are worried about the horse stopping, ask the owners of the horse if the horse minds spurs, if he/she doesn't, always good to wear them. Have your hair up and neat and tidy (just as you would for h/j). You really don't need to go out and buy anything (most people don't have a canary/tattersall vest in their stock of show/riding clothes), just show up clean and in order.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2005
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    969

    Wink my 2 cents

    Quote Originally Posted by pvcjumper View Post
    need everyone to hold my hand through what i need to buy, wear, do, say, NOT do or say (i already know they are hounds not dogs ).
    Be sure to find out who is staff (Master, Huntsman, Whips) at the beginning and stay out of their way; if they have to back-track through the field, face your horse to them. THANK them at the end, a lot of work goes into the hunt. You are a guest, so pay attention to the order of the field and if someone with their colors (male, "pinque" coat, female, colors on coat collar) is behind you, you should ask them if they would like to go ahead of you. Do not talk during the hunt (except for warnings or to relay instructions), when the hounds are working. This is a pet peeve of mine. Of course people chat during the checks. If a hound comes close, make sure that you face the hound. It is the cardinal sin of hunting to allow a horse to kick or step on a hound. Stay single file, one horse length apart and do not allow your horse to pass the horse in front of him. If it is a large open field, sometimes people spread out a bit.

    [/QUOTE]I have never seen or ridden the horse i will be meeting an hour before the hunt meets... what if he is a dirty stopper?! Or doesnt like me and is fussy?! I dont want to hit a solid fence! Should i wear a protection vest my first time out just in case? What happens before, after, and during the hunt? (This group does live hunts, no kill though).
    Help!?![/QUOTE]

    You should talk to the owner of the horse or whoever rides him and see if he has any "quirks". For example, not many hunt horses need spurs, they get jazzed enough to be out hunting. If you are not comfortable jumping, dont, you can ride in the non-jumping group. some hunts have a "flats" that goes right with or behind the jumpers and some have "hilltoppers" that hang back a bit. Be sure to ask, in some hunts, the hilltoppers just trot, and some go faster than the first field as they have to cover more ground. Sometimes guests are expected to ride in the back. You could move up to the jumping field after you get used to the horse. Most hunt horses are honest jumpers and love it; a good guest horse very much so. You might also ask about the size of the jumps and if there are gaps closeby, so you can go around if things are not going your way, but be sure to discuss with someone how this will work, as some fields follow so close together, and expect the jumpers to try to take all the jumps, others do alot of "pick and choose". If your horse refuses, get out of the way and let the others get at the fence.

    Before the hunt, you should warm up the horse, as sometimes the pace is fast right away. The field will gather and get instructions from the MFH or the Fieldmaster. You should work out then what group you will ride with. Some hunts have the guests introduce themselves. Will you be riding with the people that invited you ? Someone should be with you that knows the ropes for your first time. And be available to hack back with you should the need arise (if you withdraw from the field, be sure to tell the fieldmaster of your group)

    AFter the hunt, be sure to thank the staff and anyone who helped you. There is often a breakfast or tea, and you are expected to wear your coat and boots (wipe off the mud) but remove spurs. Everyone will attend to their horses first. Be sure to find out who is hosting the meal and thank them too.

    Above all else, have fun!!! Hunting is controlled chaos. The rules are to keep everyone safe.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 23, 2000
    Location
    Craig Co., VA, USA
    Posts
    177

    Default

    Howdy pvcjumper,

    Foxhunters are just a group of folks out to have fun. We dress in those duds because we are guests of those who own the land we trample. They let us do this because we look so nice, at least from a distance.

    Check out Doug Morris' page at http://foxhunting.freeservers.com/index.html
    and look over the Commandments section and the glossary.

    Have a great time and, please, report back to this forum your experiences.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2004
    Location
    Mitchellville, Iowa
    Posts
    181

    Default Went on my first hunt this past Sunday

    Hi, pvcjumper, just wanted to tell you I went on my first hunt this past Sunday and had a lot of fun. Everyone was so nice. My horse even held up a couple guys because he wouldn't cross a stream. They stayed back with me to get him over it. There are rules to follow, but everyone is very nice about reminding you of them as I made the mistake of calling the hounds the d-word a couple of times I went in the slower group as I had never been before. It was a great time. The hounds did find a coyote to chase but never caught it.



  7. #7
    10nycav Guest

    Smile

    Hi pvcjumper,

    Well I went on my first two hunts in late October and they were the most fun I have ever had on a horse! I was back East visiting and therefore was not riding my own horse--in fact I had never ridden this horse before the morning of the hunt. To make matters worse I had just read the book "Horse People" before the hunt (great book by the way) where the writer had a harrowing experience because he was severely "overhorsed" on his first hunt. It sounded like a case of bad communication--the writer did not adequately explain his own experience and limitations, and the lender of the horse seemed to have made some assumptions about the rider's skill.

    So here's my advice, for what it's worth--
    I would not advise anyone to go fox hunting unless they are comfortable galloping outdoors, over uneven terrain. From your handle I assume that you already know how to jump--if you plan to go first field (with the folks who are taking the jumps) being comfortable jumping outdoors, and taking solid jumps, as opposed to jumping in a groomed arena with "fall down" jumps, is important. If you have ridden cross country or evented even at the lower levels, you probably do have the skills needed to feel comfortable on the hunt field.

    Don't oversell your level of riding experience to the folks who are providing you with a horse. "Beginner," "intermediate" or "advanced" can mean different things to different people! Instead I would relay specific information, especially those related to the two essential skills noted above. Also, are you comfortable riding a horse that gets really strong with you? Or do you need a horse that rates easily to be confident? (I know that's one of my own issues.) Are you good at encouraging a horse to jump if he wavers? Or do you need a horse that will jump no matter what? Let your hosts know about these things to so that they can find a horse that will be a good match for both your skills and your temperament. And definitely, as another person here noted, ask questions about the horse, his quirks, what he does and doesn't like. Does he get upset if he's not in front, or is he content to motor along at the back of the field? Do you need to check him before a jump, or drive him forward? Does he need hand-holding, or is he the kind of horse who prefers to be left alone to do his job, and gets irritated if you try to interfere? (My hunt horse liked to go on a long, even loose rein and as far as jumping goes, he preferred to be interfered with as little as possible. He knew his job!)

    In my case I started out in second field, took a couple of optional jumps with permission, and then was invited to come up with the first field. This gave me time to get a feel for the horse. So if you feel unsure of yourself I would encourage you to start in second field. "Train hard, test easy." After all you want to have a good time your first time out, and be eager for more. You could ask the field master if there are opportunities to take jumps if you so desire. (They may have you wait until the other horses are through the gate.) If you do wanto to change fields make sure this is OK--some hunts allow it and others don't. Make sure both field masters know that you have changed fields.

    The Hunt Secretary also gave me some pithy advice before I went out: "Your horse WILL run to catch up with the other horses; when he does catch up, he WILL slow down." (Not an exact quote but close.) This no doubt, was meant to reassure me if I felt like I was getting run away with. And with most horses, it certainly is accurate. (A few horses will blast past the leaders --bad etiquette--but I very much doubt that your hosts would put you on a horse like that your first time out.)

    Last but not least--Once the hunt begins, don't overthink things. Do what you can to familiarize yourself with the horse before you go out, but then trust him to do his job. Relax, "go with the flow," and have a great time!

    So hopefully this helps. Let us know how it goes for you--I for one will be interested to hear!

    Ken



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2006
    Location
    nevernever land
    Posts
    921

    Default

    Update and response (and more questions at the bottom, sorry!):

    Thanks everyone for the words of encouragement. I found out today that my friend (who is the person who invited me to the hunt) has ridden this horse i will be using before. He said he has no real quirks, but that "when the other horses start to run, he will run, and just sit back and enjoy the ride." The horse has very very little schooling jumping, i believe this is his 2nd season, and all hilltopping i believe.

    I have completely considered the fact that i am use to knock down fences, and i even get iffy with the 'solid' (wood) knock down fences in an arena, but luckily i doubt anyone will be making me jump too much since the horse has little schooling in jumping. (Lucky me!) Oddly enough, when i was a kid i full speed galloped like an idiot (...no... really, i was an idiot for some of the crap i did galloping! )...but now at a whole whopping 21 years old, i have this nagging common sense in the back of my head that says "this is not safe! Do you realize you could break your neck!?" So we will have to see how brave i am about galloping in open uneven terrain. I have only ridden in the arena the past 10 years! Havent had a chance to go x-country in that long, so i have no clue how i will feel, probably scared sh*tless though!

    I am almost 100% certain i will stay with the second flight, unless i get taunted into first flight. (Friend has a habit of telling me to stop being chicken sh*t in one way or another :-) )

    As far as attire goes, the stinkin' tack store i went to has NO hunt coats and no black coats. I barely made it out with a stock tie and pin. But friend said that a show coat will be fine until i am sure i want to invest anywho and that they arent that strict.

    I would say i will post pictures after Sunday, but i have no clue how i would be taking pictures since i will be mounted... ???

    How long does the hunt normally last? Whats happens if nature calls while riding? Do i need to bring TP?!?! What if i get hungry/thirsty? Or hurt? Or the horse gets hurt?
    Last edited by pvcjumper; Feb. 12, 2007 at 12:17 AM.
    ~*PVC JUMPER*~
    Dreams are meant to come true, not free...
    "Everything I do, I do out of fear of being mediocre."



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2006
    Location
    Hunt Valley, MD
    Posts
    2,094

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pvcjumper View Post
    How long does the hunt normally last? Whats happens if nature calls while riding? Do i need to bring TP?!?! What if i get hungry/thirsty? Or hurt? Or the horse gets hurt?
    Depending on the hunt. If it is a live hunt, expect to be out between 3-4 hours (also depends on your horses fitness, shoe loss, your own fitness, etc). I usually use the "bathroom," aka trailer, before going out, and if nature calls while riding...I hold it...never have had to so bad that I had to excuse myself from the field "to tighten my horses girth." As far as hungry/thirsty...usually don't get hungry, but as for thirsty, many members carry flask, and ladies traditional attire includes a sandwich case (has a glass flask and a tin for a sandwich). I have carried tea, gatorade, port, or other alcoholic concoctions (when it's REALLY cold out) in my flask. If you get hurt or the horse, I'm sure the members will be their to aid you. It's not often many people/horses get hurt, but it does happen!

    Good Luck and enjoy!! You'll be hooked!!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2006
    Location
    Pittstown, New Jersey
    Posts
    1,162

    Default

    A few questions for you...

    Are you hunting as a groom or guest (capping)?

    If you are hunting as a guest, have you or the trainer spoken to the master/secretary and asked permission to bring you along?

    Other than that...some things to think about...

    Bring something to drink and eat afterwards, unless you know they are having a small "breakfast" afterwards. Most times, you won't need anything out there, and you DAMN SURE won't be thinking about a bathroom. The men will hop off, but most women usually hold it...unless they have a good horse who doesn't get worried when the group leaves and they know the fixture.
    You will be riding, and possibly VERY FAST, for probably a minimum of 3 hours. And when he says "run"...that's what it means...and it doesn't matter where you are, going uphill, DOWNHILL, on a trail ducking under branches, etc...YOU WILL RUN. And if you have never ridden FULL TILT across a field...and I mean AS FAST AS YOU CAN GO...you might get to do just that. You can't slow down, you can't hold people up because you're terrified. If you have to, make sure there is someone there willing to go in early if you are too exhausted or scared. There's nothing wrong with being safe. When it's a good day, I can BARELY walk when I get off, and there were plenty of times I have felt like a ball of jello cantering through the woods. And I ride cross country 2-3 times a week.
    In second flight, if first flight doubles back, you will BACK your horse into the woods. Always turn he horses head to the staff. If there is a lone hound (or a couple) trotting up the trail passing horses, it's polite to say "beware hound on left/right" in a quiet voice. Otherwise, there is no chatter and no talking. When you get to a check, you can talk then, just take the example from the field master. Watch for holes...if you see one, point in the direction and quietly say "hole on left/right". And if you are a groom or guest, you will need to stay in the back, and offer to help or stand with the person getting the gates or if someone needs help.
    And last, always say "Good morning, master" and thank the same when you return. Most important.
    My boys...
    http://community.webshots.com/user/FirstStepBack
    RIP Gem...for you are the greatest...thank you for the inspiration...I will always remember you!
    Gem Twist (1979-2006)



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2005
    Location
    Rappahannock County VA
    Posts
    629

    Default

    This is one of the BEST most informative "what it's really like" posts I've seen on this topic.

    I recommend taking some Aleve or Tylenol the morning of the hunt with your breakfast. The combination of nerves and physical activity WILL make you sore next day; it always helps me to pre-medicate. The kind of fitness needed for foxhunting is way different that arena riding even if you ride every day in the arena. Last year, there were several times I thought I was going to pass out and fall off if we didn't stop trotting soon!!! AC&Ty...it's evil of me, but I am in some sick way comforted from hearing you say that some days even someone as fit as YOU can barely walk when you get off! And I will admit to some sick sense of camaraderie when I see other folks dismounting back at the meet in the same creaky, critchety way that I do!

    Eat a nutritious, generous dinner and lots of water the night before; have a high energy breakfast the morning of! Not too much coffee, though, and definitely "use the trailer" right before you get on...you'll be glad you did.

    I'm glad to hear someone acknowledge the possibility of being terrified when running flat out over hill and dale. It IS scary when you're not used to it. If you get really worried, try and remember that someone you trust has put you on a horse they trust, all you need to do is keep a leg on each side and try not to interfere with the horse too much except for balancing and steering. Sounds great in theory, but I admit I personally do not feel comfortable galloping and find that when we are moving on, I have to FORCE myself to let my mule go fast enough to keep up--I'd much rather hold her back to a slower pace that feels safer...and I have to watch myself, because I do that without even realizing I am doing it! Then we end up in a big unpleasant fight which is probably worse than just letting her run.

    Bottom line, you're going to have fun. The "rules" seem less imposing each time you go out. Can't wait to hear your report of your first hunt!
    I ride a mule. I paint dogs.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2006
    Location
    nevernever land
    Posts
    921

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AC & Ty View Post
    A few questions for you...

    Are you hunting as a groom or guest (capping)?

    If you are hunting as a guest, have you or the trainer spoken to the master/secretary and asked permission to bring you along?
    The person that invited me is the secretary i believe, so yes, he knows And i am going as a guest, not a groom. So i will be shelling out some $$
    ~*PVC JUMPER*~
    Dreams are meant to come true, not free...
    "Everything I do, I do out of fear of being mediocre."



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2006
    Location
    nevernever land
    Posts
    921

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MuleLady View Post
    This is one of the BEST most informative "what it's really like" posts I've seen on this topic.

    I recommend taking some Aleve or Tylenol the morning of the hunt with your breakfast. The combination of nerves and physical activity WILL make you sore next day; it always helps me to pre-medicate. The kind of fitness needed for foxhunting is way different that arena riding even if you ride every day in the arena. Last year, there were several times I thought I was going to pass out and fall off if we didn't stop trotting soon!!! AC&Ty...it's evil of me, but I am in some sick way comforted from hearing you say that some days even someone as fit as YOU can barely walk when you get off! And I will admit to some sick sense of camaraderie when I see other folks dismounting back at the meet in the same creaky, critchety way that I do!

    Eat a nutritious, generous dinner and lots of water the night before; have a high energy breakfast the morning of! Not too much coffee, though, and definitely "use the trailer" right before you get on...you'll be glad you did.

    I'm glad to hear someone acknowledge the possibility of being terrified when running flat out over hill and dale. It IS scary when you're not used to it. If you get really worried, try and remember that someone you trust has put you on a horse they trust, all you need to do is keep a leg on each side and try not to interfere with the horse too much except for balancing and steering. Sounds great in theory, but I admit I personally do not feel comfortable galloping and find that when we are moving on, I have to FORCE myself to let my mule go fast enough to keep up--I'd much rather hold her back to a slower pace that feels safer...and I have to watch myself, because I do that without even realizing I am doing it! Then we end up in a big unpleasant fight which is probably worse than just letting her run.

    Bottom line, you're going to have fun. The "rules" seem less imposing each time you go out. Can't wait to hear your report of your first hunt!
    Well, i am hoping since his 9 or 10 year old client can keep up (she just started foxhunting with him), that i will be able to. Then again, she has that little kid sense of fearlessness! Which i dont know if i have anymore! You would think at 21 i would be all "balls to the wall" and tally ho and what have you, but i know i am thiiiiissss --><-- skinny and will snap like a twig if i hit the ground! Last time i hit the ground (wont say when because i DO NOT need bad juju) i fractured my hip, broke 2 ribs and obliterated my elbow...elbow took the longest to heal and it SUCKED! I guess this will be my experience to see if i have what it takes to do xcountry or not And i will be perfectly honest!! ... i defintitely am a bit scared! Maybe i will head out and do a little non jumping galloping on the barns property today. Its 20-30 acres and lots of hills, wont be the same as where i am riding i am sure, but it will help me feel better maybe. ok... definitely getting nervous now! eep
    ~*PVC JUMPER*~
    Dreams are meant to come true, not free...
    "Everything I do, I do out of fear of being mediocre."



  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2006
    Location
    Pittstown, New Jersey
    Posts
    1,162

    Default

    Which hunt???

    Does the person who INVITED you OWN the horse, too??? If so, it's much cheaper to go as the groom, instead...probably like 60 bucks cheaper....or more...all you'd really have to do is make sure you helped with their horse first, then untacked it or cared for it afterwards...(some people untack, some don't...personal preference...but a sheet or cooler to throw on afterwards is a good idea.)
    My boys...
    http://community.webshots.com/user/FirstStepBack
    RIP Gem...for you are the greatest...thank you for the inspiration...I will always remember you!
    Gem Twist (1979-2006)



  15. #15
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2006
    Location
    Pittstown, New Jersey
    Posts
    1,162

    Default

    OH...and let me just say...I have gone in early PLENTY of times. I would rather be razzed for going in early than fall off and end up on crutches or worse!

    And the times I went in early, I was home on leave from the Marine Corps. Active duty. And I wasn't fit enough to make it the whole time. If that gives you an idea. And I was riding a PACKER! NAMED "SOFA"!!!!!!!
    My boys...
    http://community.webshots.com/user/FirstStepBack
    RIP Gem...for you are the greatest...thank you for the inspiration...I will always remember you!
    Gem Twist (1979-2006)



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2006
    Location
    Hunt Valley, MD
    Posts
    2,094

    Default

    I'm with AC & Ty and MuleLady on this. From your description, you definitely haven't been prepped a ton for hunting. I hate to hear that you "break" so easily! Not a very good thing! Even on a "slow" day I will come in and you'll wake up the next day and be sore. As for riding xc, even in the second field you are going to be GALLOPING full tilt up and down hills, up is usually ok for people, it's the down part that most first timers or inexperience people have issues with. There is also lots of tight turns and fast turns as you gallop through the woods, I can't even count the number of times I have hit trees with my knees!! Even have hit a tree with my hand, and it broke the fingertips. You need to be on your game the WHOLE time you are out there, you will have the occassional hound run up from behind you, and you will have staff also and will need to get out of the way of the staff. You don't want to be running up on the person in front of you and you want to be able to turn and check your horse readily.

    You mentioned getting coaxed into first flight?? DO NOT GET COAXED! If your horse doesn't have much schooling over jumps, and it's your first time out, that's almost a disaster waiting to happen. The jumps are SOLID and for a horse that is an inexperienced jumper, that is an accident waiting to happen! I have taken an inexperienced jumper out hunting, and many times it has turned out "ok," but earlier this year, over about a 2 ft log, going full tilt, the greenie deer jumped it like it was 5 ft tall (granted it was also raining and my horse was braided so there was nothing to hang on to)...my butt hit the ground so hard, I'm pretty sure I bruised my tailbone! That being said, make sure you have a martigale or breastcollar...basically something like an "oh sh*t handle." If i'm riding a greenie, many times I'll have my ring and pinkie fingers tucked through the martingale (if I have one), just in case. It's a habit I learned from the steeplechase trainer I used to ride for.

    Is there any way you can go out and ride the horse prior to you taking the horse hunting? This may be the best way for you to get a little more comfortable. I hate to say all this and be discouraging, but no one wants to see you get hurt! Foxhunters as a whole are welcoming people and we want people to come back and join us, so no one wants your first outing to be disasterous, we want you to be safe.

    Sorry for the book, just want to make sure you are as safe as possible out there. Another recommendation, see if your trainer can find you someone in the second field, or wherever you ride, to be your buddy. Someone to just keep an eye on you and if you decide to go in early, they can take you in. Good luck, and be safe!

    Oh yeah, and I second Mule Lady's suggestion about taking Aleve, advil, or another pain killer before riding! If it's not your knees, it'll be your head! I swear it doesn't matter what size my helmet is, I always come in and my head hurts!



  17. #17
    10nycav Guest

    Default

    Hi again,

    Some great advice posted here. A couple of things you mention in your second post illuminated your situation better.

    "The horse has very very little schooling jumping, i believe this is his 2nd season, and all hilltopping i believe."

    If this is only the horse's second season and he has only hilltopped, and you have never hunted before, there is NO WAY I would even think about going first field. Stay with the hilltoppers--don't ask the horse to do something he hasn't done before AND take care of you as a new rider. In my own case as a first-time hunter, I was provided with a horse that was a seasoned hunter and had ridden first field. Entirely different situation. Even so, I started in second field and moved up only after I had gotten a feel for the horse.

    "I am almost 100% certain i will stay with the second flight, unless i get taunted into first flight. (Trainer has a habit of telling me to stop being chicken sh*t in one way or another :-) )"

    As the previous poster said, don't get taunted. There is a fine line between a trainer or friend encouraging you to expand the boundary of what you think possible--which in a schooling situation may be very appropriate--and getting you in over your head in a "real world" situation where there are many variables outside your control. And fox hunting is "real world" for sure. In this case, given the experience level you have described, just riding cross country in a group is PLENTY to bite off and chew. Don't feel like you need to prove anything to anybody.

    Ken



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 8, 2006
    Posts
    364

    Default

    Mule Lady wrote:

    "Eat a nutritious, generous dinner and lots of water the night before; have a high energy breakfast the morning of! Not too much coffee, though, and definitely "use the trailer" right before you get on...you'll be glad you did."


    I beg to differ on one point, but it probably depends on the individual's constitution. I definitely eat something the morning of a hunt but drink very little beginning the afternoon before. There is NOTHING more miserable than realizing you need to visit the ladies room again, (either from drinking or the sheer excitement), mere minutes after getting on your horse. When it is a cold morning and you find yourself sitting still.....like in the wind for an endless period of time.....no facilities for another 3 hours.....it can be agony of sorts! It is just one thing you do not want to find yourself worrying about your first time out hunting.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2005
    Location
    Rappahannock County VA
    Posts
    629

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    Yet consider that even mild dehydration can contribute significantly to fatigue. So I guess it's really a matter of what the OP can tolerate. She's a young'un, though, so no doubt is less prone to "sudden, frequent urges" to go that some of us older gals might tend to experience, LOL! That's why the cheap little porta potty I have in my dressing room is one of the best "upgrades" I have added to my rig!
    I ride a mule. I paint dogs.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2006
    Location
    nevernever land
    Posts
    921

    Default

    ok, another update and responses!

    I am definitely staying in the back... period, end of story :-) I am assuming i wont even want to jump him, even in the back, since this will be my first time out xcountry. That will be nerve racking enough.

    Though i am a 'young'un' and normally dont have frequent urges... once i am in a nervous situation, i am like a little kid. If i hide trying to sneak up on the boyfriend i need to pee! lol. If i am next up to give a speech in class... lol... you get the idea. So definitely will use the little mares room before i mount up!

    AND to freak me out MORE, last minute changes have occurred and my trainer notified me today that he will be bringing me out there, and introduce me to people, but that he will not be hunting that day! WTF!?!?! I know he'd be first flight anyways, but now i am going to be all alone to embarrass myself! lol. I hope the little kid i mentioned earlier goes! lol, i will stick back with her! She is cute and will give me a 'reason' to be slower! hehehe
    ~*PVC JUMPER*~
    Dreams are meant to come true, not free...
    "Everything I do, I do out of fear of being mediocre."



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