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  1. #81
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2006
    Location
    Sno County
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    3,890

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    "Just where exactly DOES the saddle pad go - how far forward - and that little lift that trail riders do to the pad to tuck it into the saddle and leave the back bone free and dry -does that really work??"

    Put the pad on a little forward, slide back so when you put on the saddle in its correct spot - end of tree right behind shoulder - you have at minimum 1" of pad all around.

    You should pull up the pad into the gullet of all saddles, not just western, so there's no undue pressure on the wither. My husband neglected to do that with his pack horse but noticed it around 2 miles down the trail and that was with a very thick and fleecy pad. Repacked, tucked the pad up but the damage was done. Two weeks later, he had a fistula the size of a fist. Horse was down for the rest of the summer and into the fall and always had a scar.
    Last edited by Mtn trails; Nov. 16, 2006 at 05:40 PM.
    Yogurt - If you're so cultured, how come I never see you at the opera? Steven Colbert



  2. #82
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2003
    Location
    Here again...
    Posts
    401

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    Quote Originally Posted by Foxygrl516 View Post
    Ok, here's a question:

    I am very good at knowing different kinds of bits, and what they do. Even if it's a bit I've never seen I can look at the mouthpiece and where everything attaches and tell you this bit's purpose.
    HOWEVER, there is one bit that I thoroughly don't understand and it's fairly basic (I think atleast). It's a 3 ring. I have one, ride in it a lot, love it, know what it does for my horse (hense why there is confusion). Most people call it and "Elevator Bit" and I"ve heard people fussing about people combining those with Running martingales (Mixed messages and all). BUT, if you look at the bit and how it is put together it looks obviously to be a bit with leverage therefore encouraging a horse to drop his head because it puts direct pressure on the Poll. When I use it on my horse this is exactly the effect it has. I even use it with 2 reins sometimes (weird idea I came up with one weekend that actually worked really well). One rein on the big hole so to act like a basic snaffle, and one rein on the bottom ring to give extra leverage only when needed.

    So WHY is it called an Elevator bit?????? Why do people think you shouldn't use it w/ a martingale b/c of mixed signals? Seems those 2 things give very much the same signal...? Someone please explain. I'm obviously missing something here!!!!!

    Calling it an elevator is a North American thing. All of our Pony Club (so, British) literature refers to it as a "Continental Gag" or "Dutch Gag". An elevator looks like this: http://www.quickbits.net/other/76.htm . When I think of it as a gag, it makes much more sense to me (but try walking into a tack shop and asking for a Dutch gag--most of the staff have no idea what you're talking about). The only thing that makes me crazier is when people call it a "3-Ring snaffle". It's NOT a snaffle.

    Oh, and using it with two reins is the most correct usage.



  3. #83
    Join Date
    Jan. 23, 2002
    Location
    On the verge of a breakdown
    Posts
    2,869

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    I must be the only person on earth who didn't curse when putting the martingale stopper on my new martingale. It was easier than putting bit guards on!



  4. #84
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    Northern New Jersey
    Posts
    2,474



  5. #85
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 2000
    Location
    school
    Posts
    5,995

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    "Scope" is the ability to jump various widths/heigts/combinations thereof and look good doing it. We used to use it in reference to oxers "scopes out over it" like a telescope, I guess, but the defination kinda changed.. I don't even hear it anymore.

    That's the only one I noticed wasn't answered.....
    A good rhyme for banadaging is "Inside towards the nose" so that every time you wrap, when the bandage is on the inside of the horse's leg, it's going towards his nose. I still occasionally hear old students chanting this in....side..towar....dsthenose

    I can never remember offhand:
    Which is ridden in, a chambon or DeGogue
    TPR, well temp yes, but I have to think think about the "textbook" P and R


    I've never:
    Given an IV and I was a trainer Vets do that LOL
    Clipped without getting *some* kind of line somewhere



  6. #86
    Join Date
    Feb. 24, 1999
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    3,539

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela Freda View Post
    Um, I hate to tell you this but there is an "L" on the right hand also.
    For a Dyslexic that ol' "L" thing was never very helpful.
    Exactly! Don't EVER ask me for directions because I will get you lost at least once.

    Horse related....I don't know how to clip ears. I can clip anything else, just not ears. I chalk that up to owning beasties who were really violent about having their ears clipped so I always had my trainers do it. Since I've never had a cooperative candidate to learn on, I don't know how...



  7. #87
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2002
    Location
    Go Bucks!
    Posts
    3,634

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    Quote Originally Posted by ddashaq View Post
    Despite having polo wrapped a gazillion legs, I still have a tendency to wrap the right ones backwards. In fact, I passed this on to one of my friends who was finally corrected about it when she was on her college polo team. I was a wee bit embarrassed!
    I unfortunately have wrapped a million legs too, and I still have to consciously watch the start of the right leg to be sure I do it correctly. I'm right handed, so maybe that has something to do with it.



  8. #88
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    6,911

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    For the love of God, someone PLEASE tell us how to poultice! I don't know either!

    I don't know how to use a lungeing cavesson or side reins. I've been taught how to lunge with a halter or bridle, but once you get the serious hardcore stuff, I get lost. But my trainer tells me that I'll have to learn sometime soon if I want my new five-year-old horse to start carrying his head lower!

    I can't set up a series of jumps without a tape measure to regulate the striding. And yes, I try the "let's see how big my stride is" game every time I put the tape measure out, and can't figure out how big my average stride really is. And I have to have the distance chart in my pocket or I'll goof that up too.
    ________________________
    Resident COTH saddle nerd. (CYA: Not a pro, just a long-time enthusiast!)
    http://twitter.com/jenlmichaels



  9. #89
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2003
    Posts
    1,195

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    Quote Originally Posted by Too Old for Pony Club View Post
    Calling it an elevator is a North American thing. All of our Pony Club (so, British) literature refers to it as a "Continental Gag" or "Dutch Gag". An elevator looks like this: http://www.quickbits.net/other/76.htm . When I think of it as a gag, it makes much more sense to me (but try walking into a tack shop and asking for a Dutch gag--most of the staff have no idea what you're talking about). The only thing that makes me crazier is when people call it a "3-Ring snaffle". It's NOT a snaffle.

    Oh, and using it with two reins is the most correct usage.
    So it IS NOT actually an elevator bit? That is just incorrect terminology? I just call it a 3 ring (NOT snaffle). Some people in my area call it a bubble bit and that really bugs me. So I'm right, it's purpose is that of a curb in a sense that it puts pressure on the poll and lowers the head? And the people that get mad about the martingale and "mixed messages" are just assuming since it's an "elevator" that it serves some other purpose? Wow.

    That's funny about the reins. I've never seen anyone use one this way. I was just working at a HT in May (where I do most of my good brainstorming) and was thinking about how leverage pisses my guy off if used constantly (which is why the 3 ring was hanging useless in the tack room) but that leverage sure would be a good thing to have ever few strides with a half halt. So I bought tiny reins and tried it. I don't think I've ever been so successful with a combo like that. It is awsome. Glad to know I'm not totally off the wall in doing this. Thanks for the info!!!!



  10. #90
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2006
    Location
    California
    Posts
    70

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    Quote Originally Posted by Huntertwo View Post
    Never have and do not know how to wrap a leg...
    Neitehr can I, and I really should!! I'm way too afraid to try it anyway, waaaay too many horror stories!



  11. #91
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2003
    Posts
    1,195

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    Quote Originally Posted by jn4jenny View Post
    For the love of God, someone PLEASE tell us how to poultice! I don't know either!

    I don't know how to use a lungeing cavesson or side reins. I've been taught how to lunge with a halter or bridle, but once you get the serious hardcore stuff, I get lost. But my trainer tells me that I'll have to learn sometime soon if I want my new five-year-old horse to start carrying his head lower!

    I can't set up a series of jumps without a tape measure to regulate the striding. And yes, I try the "let's see how big my stride is" game every time I put the tape measure out, and can't figure out how big my average stride really is. And I have to have the distance chart in my pocket or I'll goof that up too.
    Poultice:

    It's really easy! All you need is a bucket of poultice, paper of some sort, pillow (or no bows) wraps and standing bandages.

    Smear Poultice all over the horse's leg from knee to fetlock. Front to back, cover tendons and all.
    Then wet your paper (Can use the inner paper lining of feed bags, paper towels, whatever) and wrap it loosely around the leg over the poultice. Squeeze it a little so it sticks to the leg.
    Then just wrap! Pillow or no-bow first, clock-wise on rights, counter clockwise on lefts, then wrap a standing bandage over it so it all stays put. Poultice doesn't need to be done very tightly. Obviously if it's too loose it'll slide down, but if you can fit a finger or 2 in between the leg and the bandage you're good to go!



  12. #92
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 2000
    Location
    school
    Posts
    5,995

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    Poulticing For Dummies
    Slap the stuff on the leg, just under 1/4 inch thick.
    Wrap over the poultice with saran wrap or plastic bags to keep the poultice wetter, longer (longer drawing time) OR
    Use paper lunch bags dipped in water for lesser drawing time.
    Wrap with no-bows over all that.
    Wrap with standings over that.



  13. #93
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2004
    Location
    Yew-stuhn, Texas
    Posts
    2,472

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    I can't braid. At all.

    Nor can I body clip.

    Nor do I know how to pull a trailer. I've owned horses for over 20 years, and have never owned a trailer...
    Last edited by texang73; Nov. 16, 2006 at 01:03 PM.
    View my photographs at www.horsephotoguy.zenfolio.com



  14. #94
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2005
    Location
    Just east of Short Hill Mtn.
    Posts
    2,699

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    Quote Originally Posted by MeredithTX View Post
    Diagonals I can do, but I suck at feeling leads on a straight line.
    Ditto!
    "Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall." - Confucious
    <>< I.I.



  15. #95
    Join Date
    Mar. 22, 2004
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,413

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    i have no idea what a mullen mouth is. zero clue why sometimes draw reins are put in between the horse's front legs or why they're done on the sides. no clue on the difference between a flash attachment and a figure-8. any help?

    i'm good with the wrapping, pretty good at feeling diagonals - not 100% but prety good. leads are felt easily. i was taught how to clean a stall by the best.



  16. #96
    Join Date
    May. 11, 2002
    Location
    S Ctrl Kentucky
    Posts
    3,430

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    Okay, what about the latest change in terminology regarding seats. Exactly WHAT is the difference between a full seat, half seat and two point? I was always taught that half seat and two point were interchangeable. But at the Jeff Cook clinic at EA last week, he was explaining that half seat is full seat, but with your upper body forward and two point is your bum out of the saddle.

    RIP Full Metal Jacket "Jack" 1998 -2/27/09
    RIP Salisbury Hill "Ted" 1979-4/2/10
    "God have mercy on the man who doubts what he's sure of" -Springsteen



  17. #97
    Join Date
    May. 11, 2002
    Location
    S Ctrl Kentucky
    Posts
    3,430

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    Quote Originally Posted by LulaBell View Post
    i have no idea what a mullen mouth is. zero clue why sometimes draw reins are put in between the horse's front legs or why they're done on the sides. no clue on the difference between a flash attachment and a figure-8. any help?

    i'm good with the wrapping, pretty good at feeling diagonals - not 100% but prety good. leads are felt easily. i was taught how to clean a stall by the best.
    Mullen mouth is a solid bar bit.

    No idea on the draw reins, but don't see too many people using them to the sides anymore.

    A flash and figure eight do pretty much the same thing, to keep the horse's mouth shut, but flashes are usually used by dressage horses and figure 8's are used by jumpers. I personally think a figure 8 looks really sporty!
    RIP Full Metal Jacket "Jack" 1998 -2/27/09
    RIP Salisbury Hill "Ted" 1979-4/2/10
    "God have mercy on the man who doubts what he's sure of" -Springsteen



  18. #98
    Join Date
    Jun. 5, 2006
    Location
    Northern NJ
    Posts
    131

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaegermonster View Post
    Actually it's "Distal" but don't feel bad, I can't feel it either. I know where it is, just never can feel it.
    Actually "Digital Pulse" is also correct, and the more commonly used term, as the pulse is taken from the "Digital Arteries" in the horses pasterns.



  19. #99
    Join Date
    Jun. 5, 2006
    Location
    State of constant chaos
    Posts
    852

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fessy's Mom View Post
    Okay, what about the latest change in terminology regarding seats. Exactly WHAT is the difference between a full seat, half seat and two point? I was always taught that half seat and two point were interchangeable. But at the Jeff Cook clinic at EA last week, he was explaining that half seat is full seat, but with your upper body forward and two point is your bum out of the saddle.

    My understanding is that "half seat" is just sitting a bit lighter in your tack, slightly forward, basically hovering. Two point, of course, is "jumping position," so your butt is out of the saddle and your upper body forward (hip and ankles aligned). In full seat, your shoulders, hips and ankles are aligned with more weight in the saddle.

    Sign me up as another person who can't pick up my diagonals correctly to save my life. I always start posting and sit two beats. You'd think I'd be able to figure out how to get it right the first time!

    On wrapping...do both the pillow wraps and the standing wraps get wrapped in the same direction (i.e. clockwise on the right legs and counter on the left)? Do you start wrapping on the inside of the leg or the outside? Thanks!
    Re-riding "Mama" to two impish red-haired boys--a small 4 yo human and a very big chestnut TB hunter



  20. #100
    TomP Guest

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    <<...elastic on left--easier to adjust saddle than moving leg with sword attached...>>

    I must not be understanding what you're saying here. It appears to me that you're saying the sword (I'm assuming you're talking about horse cavalry) is on the right so it's easier to adjust the saddle on the left. If I remember correctly, the sword is worn on the left since most troops (swordsmen) are/were right handed and would, therefore, have their sword carried on the left. That's where I wore it anyway (No, wasn't in horse cavalry, but in air cavalry units and we wore swords on occasion.) Not arguing, just trying to understand what you were saying.

    Tom



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