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  1. #181
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2004
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    832

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    Quote by WBlover "Unfortunately, most Arabs are built in such a way that makes it much harder for them to be "through". They were bred to be "pretty", not for sport, although there are exceptions to every rule. Even endurance-bred Arabs don't need to collect for their job."

    Just curious, can you (or anyone else) explain this statement?
    Up until fairly recently in arabian history, breeding arabians to be 'pretty' was not the first criteria.There are ALOT of them out there that are not 'pretty' as arabians go...and anyway, one CAN have pretty and functional...there are some darn pretty warmbloods out there (Rosenthal, Ironman, etc etc)...

    And the US Calvery Remount wasn't interested in pretty...the Europeans have been infusing arabian blood into warmblood registries for a long long time.
    The thoroughbred was bred for sport, and they started out with arabs..

    I think the current atmosphere (started in the early 80's) of arabians being non functional, just pretty, and not 'capable' of sport due to their 'conformation' (??) is a sad, but a real misconception that arose fromthe halter ring, that will take YEARS to erase...if ever...

    anyway, hope someone can explain the above statement about the conformation problems of arabs(as it pertains to their breed standard, not to some of the terribly unput together ones that are out there along with the terribly unput together 'other breeds'), am not an accomplished dressage person so am trying to learn all the time. AM an accomplished sport horse breeder (arabs, TBs, crosses) and husband is a 50 year veteran of professional equine sports (NOT dressage OR just arabians ) so would love a detailed explanation ...thanks!



  2. #182
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2000
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    24,408

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    would you love a detailed explanation that didn't agree with your opinion? don't want to spend a lot of time typing if not.



  3. #183
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2006
    Posts
    587

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    Quote Originally Posted by ancientoaks
    Quote by WBlover "Unfortunately, most Arabs are built in such a way that makes it much harder for them to be "through". They were bred to be "pretty", not for sport, although there are exceptions to every rule. Even endurance-bred Arabs don't need to collect for their job."

    I think the current atmosphere (started in the early 80's) of arabians being non functional, just pretty, and not 'capable' of sport due to their 'conformation' (??) is a sad, but a real misconception that arose fromthe halter ring, that will take YEARS to erase...if ever...

    anyway, hope someone can explain the above statement about the conformation problems of arabs(as it pertains to their breed standard, not to some of the terribly unput together ones that are out there along with the terribly unput together 'other breeds'),
    I think you answered your own question! Twenty years is long enough to do some "damage" to a breed. And before everyone gets their panties in a wad I am not one of those that thinks Arabs are damaged. I just think some incredibly irresponsible and excessive overbreeding was done with Arabs in the 80s? that created an abudence of less than quality arabs. I also think the same thing happened and still does with Quarter Horses. While I can't state this as fact, it does seem that the most common backyard breeders tend to either have arabs or quarter horses.

    I know that there are some incredible talented and athletic arabs and quarter horses out there that would probably kick the pants off of most warmbloods. I believe that the most limiting factor in many nondressage type breeds is the rider/owner that they get and the trainer that is picked.

    I also think it is just plain silly to get into breed bashing. Let's face it, a vast majority of all dressage horses don't make it past fourth level. A good arab would no doubtedly be very competetive against a good warmblood up through those levels and then even beyond. But, if an international level FEI trainer was looking for a young horse then they more than likely are going to be looking at the warmblood breeds best suited for dressage. They probably wouldn't be looking at too many holsteiners either (aren't they the warmblood breed that excells at jumping?)>



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