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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2006
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    1,308

    Default Not too happy w/my riding instructor yesterday...

    Yesterday I got to ride a new "schooling" horse named Baily. Usually I ride Bailys Mom, but my instrutor thought I was ready for a more "challanging" mount.

    I guess to her challanging means a pasture sour horse that will hold a trot for about 10 feet (unless we were moving in the direction of the pasture). A horse that requires 1000 lbs of leg pressure for a right turn, and one that stops and REFUSES to move no matter how much kissing, clucking ad kicking I applied. My instructor went and got the lunge whip because I refused to use a riding crop. (I was paying to learn lead changes that day, not to teach a horse "go forward").

    By the end of the lesson my legs were killing me, I hasn't learned a damn thing, and the most winded creature in the arena was my instructor, from chasing the horse!

    I learned today (via phone) from one of the boarders that Baily was the instructors horse and she had leased him for a year to a girl who rarely rode him. She was using my lesson (and several other ppls) to put some miles on him so she could re-lease, or sell him.

    Nice, huh?
    I've got the 3 things men want. I'm hot, and I'm smart!

    -The 6th Member Of The Bareback Riders Clique-



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2000
    Location
    Washington, D.C., U.S.A.
    Posts
    4,155

    Default

    My goodness you sound like a princess.

    I guess "learning to ride" in your book means "mount me on a packer so I can do lead changes and have fun."

    If you were one of my students and "refused" to use a crop when I told you to, I'd tell you to get your princess a$$ off the horse and come back when you wanted to learn to ride.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2001
    Location
    Trailer Trash Ammy!
    Posts
    19,520

    Default

    Sorry, I also think you need to learn to ride all types of horses, and that this instructor is teaching you to do exactly that. Can't fault her for doing her job.

    This is what LEARNING to ride is all about. At my barn, most of us get pretty excited when we get to ride the greenies or re-trainees! It's a compliment, as well as a challenge.

    Next time, accept the crop.
    "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 28, 2003
    Location
    COLORADO!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Posts
    6,085

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alysheba
    I hasn't learned a damn thing
    Nope. You hasn't.

    You are paying her for her skill and knowledge, and for whatever reason she must not have felt you were ready.

    At least your legs got a good workout.
    =*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*
    ~Jilltx~



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,754

    Default

    A GOOD rider NEVER blames the horse.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2000
    Location
    Ellijay, GA
    Posts
    6,038

    Default

    I agree with everyone else.

    Suck it up and ride. Maybe shes trying to teach you to RIDE!
    Busy Bee Farm, Ellijay, GA
    Never Ride Faster Than Your Guardian Angel Can Fly
    Way Back Texas~04/20/90-09/17/08
    Green Alligator "Captain"



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2006
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    1,308

    Default

    I agree, but NOT when you are learning a skill for the first time. The rider should be allowed to focus on "feeling" the horses movement, not getting him to move, or worrying if he is going to come to a dead stop. If I had just been doing a freestyle lesson, sure, bring on your worst, I LIKE riding those horses, and have ridden plenty of them before, but NOT when I am learning something new that requires a great deal of concentration. That lesson was NOT a confidence booster.

    Come on guys, if I left the lesson knowing NOTHING about what the focus of it was...something is wrong. You have to agree with that!

    And if I was a "princess" I would have stopped the lesson, or demanded a new horse, but I gutted it out.
    I've got the 3 things men want. I'm hot, and I'm smart!

    -The 6th Member Of The Bareback Riders Clique-



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 26, 2006
    Location
    Madison, Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,524

    Default

    "paying to learn lead changes that day"

    Since when do lessons work like that. You don't learn things like that in a day.

    "Come on guys, if I left the lesson knowing NOTHING about what the focus of it was...something is wrong. You have to agree with that!"

    We all agree. We agree that we know what the focus was. It was to get yourself out of your comfort zone and onto a harder horse. It's easy to point and shoot a schoolie. That doesn't mean you're riding it or that you can deal with it if it starts acting less than perfect.

    If you didn't learn anything, that's your fault, not your trainers.

    Sorry, no sympathy from me here. Princess
    Quote Originally Posted by tidy rabbit View Post
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2001
    Location
    West of insanity, east of apathy, deep in the heart of Texas.
    Posts
    15,797

    Default

    No, you did worse than stop the lesson. You quit before you ever got started, by not heeding the instructor and carrying a crop. If you had done as she'd asked, bet you'd have had a better lesson, princess.
    In loving memory of Laura Jahnke.
    A life lived by example, done too soon.
    www.caringbridge.org/page/laurajahnke/



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2001
    Location
    Lexington, Kentucky
    Posts
    7,471

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alysheba
    My instructor went and got the lunge whip because I refused to use a riding crop. (I was paying to learn lead changes that day, not to teach a horse "go forward").
    You need to have the horse going forward BEFORE you can learn a lead change. Kind of hard to do on a horse that is totally ignoring you.

    I think you DID learn something - that you aren't as accomplished a rider as you thought you were. Hurts, doesn't it?
    "My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we'll change the world." ~ Jack Layton



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,754

    Default

    I guess you just must expect something different if you are "financially wealthy at 29"

    HORSES ARE NOT MACHINES and you cannot treat them as if they were.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2003
    Posts
    2,987

    Default

    I've occasionally had a lesson that went something like that. Consistently, if the instructor gets on, the horse immediately shapes up and goes quite nicely. While it is frustrating, it can lead to a really good learning experience as well.

    Occasionally I will request that we work on a specific exercise or skill in a lesson, and the instructor usually accomadates me. Sometimes, we have to go with something else, because either the horse needs something different, or my body isn't cooperating with me.

    As Alois Podhaisky said, "I must not forget to thank the difficult horses, who made my life miserable, but who were better teachers than the well-behaved school horses who raised no problems." Riding a well-trained horse who lets me work on my position, and who is forgiving of mistakes is great, but other horses can teach valuable lessons as well.

    The guy I'm part-leasing right now is 15 years old. He has evented through Training, competed in Dressage through 2nd Level successfully, and shown Hunters at 3' and Jumpers at 3'6". He's usually very honest, calm, and does everything I ask of him. Once in a while, he's a bit frazzled, or stiff, and we need to work to resolve it before we can get to the specific things we were planning to focus on that day. Horses don't have a programmable agenda, even for shows. In lessons or rides at home, figuring out how things are going that day is an important part of the warmup. I certainly don't go around whacking him with the crop or dressage whip, but a tap here and there helps me get better work from him sometimes. On a different horse who isn't listening to the leg, it's often better to use the whip, since really getting after a horse by kicking would get my position all discombobulated and make it harder for the horse to understand what I want. Besides, even if you don't use it, many horses go better/more forward if you're carrying one.
    Stay me with coffee, comfort me with chocolate, for I am sick of love.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    Northern New Jersey
    Posts
    2,474

    Default

    I agree with everyone else- as the student you don't get to decide the focus of the lesson, your instructor does. If she felt that you were good enough to get the job done on a pasture-bound horse, you should rise to the challenge. All trainers use their students to bring horses along, fit them up and sell them or lease them out- this is nothing new in my book. If you have that many questions about your instructors' intentions, maybe you should find a new one.
    p.s. how do you do a lead change on a horse that is not moving forward? Did I miss something?
    pps. not using a crop when your instructor asks makes you a bit of a princess



  14. #14

    Default

    By reading your profile that you are financially wealthy why don't you buy yourself a made horse and then you can learn everything with out worrying about how the horse will be.

    As said before you learn from riding different types of horses. Not all are going to be good but you will learn something.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2002
    Location
    Lexington, Ky
    Posts
    684

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Whisper
    I've occasionally had a lesson that went something like that. Consistently, if the instructor gets on, the horse immediately shapes up and goes quite nicely. While it is frustrating, it can lead to a really good learning experience as well.
    Exactly. When I was teaching, if I had a whiny student who 'couldn't get the horse to do' what it was supposed to, I would say "If I can get on and get the horse to do ____, then who's problem is it?"

    My take, if you can't get a horse to go forward, you have no business learning lead changes. Your instructor is a saint.
    Life is short, do it now. www.dleestudio.com
    OTTB's
    My CANTER cutie, Steely Dan - IL
    My Exceller cutie, Ace (aka FiftyThreeCards)- NY



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2005
    Location
    California
    Posts
    731

    Default

    By the end of the lesson my legs were killing me, I hasn't learned a damn thing
    My my, if you had been one of my students you sure wouldn't have lasted long with that little attitude. Perhaps it's why I don't teach anymore. You refused to use a crop? Your poor instructor must be a saint spending all that time chasing after the horse.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2001
    Location
    West of insanity, east of apathy, deep in the heart of Texas.
    Posts
    15,797

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by dianad
    My take, if you can't get a horse to go forward, you have no business learning lead changes. Your instructor is a saint.
    My thoughts exactly. Nicely put, diana.
    In loving memory of Laura Jahnke.
    A life lived by example, done too soon.
    www.caringbridge.org/page/laurajahnke/



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2004
    Location
    Magnolia, TX
    Posts
    5,548

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alysheba
    (I was paying to learn lead changes that day, not to teach a horse "go forward").
    Good thing you weren't out to teach it go forward because you didn't. You reinforced the idea that it can ignore your leg without consequence. Next time, carry a whip. When you can sustain a slow-footed horse in balace and at an even rhythm in all gaits, then you'll be ready to work on something more complex. You will not get lead changes if you can't get the horse in a canter and keep it there, and you're not going to learn a thing from the packer that swaps leads at the mere suggestion of changing direction without any pilot input.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2005
    Location
    The Old Dominion
    Posts
    431

    Default

    Perhaps you need to speak with your trainer when you want to learn something "specifically" so she can put you on a steady eddy to learn that one thing in particular. I will say this, I have learned an awful lot from riding greenies, it may not always look pretty and maybe we didn' t do an award winning round but sometimes just staying on a difficult horse and putting him through tough situations puts those extra feathers in your riding cap.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2003
    Location
    Area 51
    Posts
    1,637

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ESG
    No, you did worse than stop the lesson. You quit before you ever got started, by not heeding the instructor and carrying a crop. If you had done as she'd asked, bet you'd have had a better lesson, princess.
    And then badmouthed your instructor in a public forum...



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