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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2006
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    MN
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    Default I'VE HAD IT UP TO HERE WITH INJURED HORSE GIVEAWAYS

    TYPICAL STORY

    I bought, or adopted a horse, it got injured and now I don't want to be responsible for it anymore (even though, the majority of the time it was injured while working its heart out for me). I am looking for someone to dump him/her off on so they can pay the feed/vet bills for the rest of the horses life, while I move on with my newer, younger, sounder mount. (Gee sounds like an average divorce in America!)

    OR....

    Is there an already overburdened rescue group that has room for one more horse from yet another irresponsible owner, because I am completely oblivious to the fact that there isn't enough room or funds to help the already abused, starved and neglected animals, or those being shipped off to the slaughter house....come on...take mine to!!!

    HORSES DO NOT BECOME THROWAWAYS JUST BECAUSE THEY CAN'T BE RIDDEN ANYMORE! It can cost less than $200 a month to find a basic boarding stable with pasture turnout, and pay a little extra for a stall in the winter, or by the horse a blanket. That horse gave its all for you! Have a little respect and TAKE CARE OF IT! If you think $200 is too much to pay, give up smoking, happy hour, cable TV, buy a smaller house, a cheaper car or get a damn paper route!

    "The right thing is usually the hardest thing to do, otherwise, everyone would be doing it"- Dr. Laura Schlessinger
    I've got the 3 things men want. I'm hot, and I'm smart!

    -The 6th Member Of The Bareback Riders Clique-


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2000
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    California
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    7,985

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    i totally agree 10000%. my goal for my future farm (after we move on from our current one) is to have a retirement farm for the old, used-up horses that people don't appreciate or care for anymore. right now i've got one and may have another if my neighbors decide to leave their pony with me. it makes me sad to know that there are horses who aren't being loved and well cared for just because they are no longer "useful".
    My Mustang Adventures - my blog!
    Yoga for Equestrians
    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 6, 1999
    Location
    Georgia
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    6,221

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    The farrier who has the property next to my parents takes many, many giveaway horses and tries to rehab them. He throws them out to pasture and then tries different types of shoeing, etc to see if he can bring them back. It not unusual to look out and see a few horses limping around out there, but we know what he is up to and we don't say anything. Anyone else would probably see all the lame ones and call animal control. He is actually able to rehab many of them and then he will sell them in to appropriate homes. The owners often don't want them back because they move on to bigger and better things. It's sad.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
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    12,191

    Default

    I agree. It drives me nuts to see people telling someone that wants to know what to do with an unsound horse, "see if a rescue can take it". Rescues are there to rescue abused and neglected horses, not offer an easy way out.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
    Posts
    8,672

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alysheba
    It can cost less than $200 a month to find a basic boarding stable with pasture turnout, and pay a little extra for a stall in the winter, or by the horse a blanket. That horse gave its all for you! Have a little respect and TAKE CARE OF IT! If you think $200 is too much to pay, give up smoking, happy hour, cable TV, buy a smaller house, a cheaper car or get a damn paper route!
    I don't know where you live, but if you think you can find that anywhere near me in that price range you are high...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2004
    Location
    somewhere over the rainbow
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    This is exactly why I have so many horses at my barn!! I have eleven here. Of those I own seven. Out of my seven six were throw aways. All were either under $500 or free. They were all in terrible condition but had great histories and I am such a sucker for the underdog. Most were med-high level show horses. They all have a permanent home with me now and can do a few lessons a week and mostly burn threw the hay I have stored in the barn. I can't even look in the free to a good home section. I'll get more.

    I do have a frustration with one of my boarders who has decided that their horse is too injury prone so they are going to get rid of her. The injuries are mostly their fault. Guess what- she will be free to a good home! GRRR.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2006
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    MN
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Perfect Pony
    I don't know where you live, but if you think you can find that anywhere near me in that price range you are high...
    Check the boonies. 50-100 miles away from the city, or take the horse somewhere where they offer those rates and ask for monthly updates/pictures from B.O., or board where someone on this BB boards and I'm sure they would be happy to give updates to make sure the horse was taken care of. I know I would!

    A Boarder that never shows up to complain is a B.O.'s favorite kind. Kind of like renters!

    Here in Minnesota (where property value is 4th highest next to Cali, NY, and Chicago) you can get pasture board w/shelter for $175 per month. Stall with turnout is between $200-$240.

    If you go to North or South Dakota your talking $75 a month!
    I've got the 3 things men want. I'm hot, and I'm smart!

    -The 6th Member Of The Bareback Riders Clique-



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2004
    Location
    Loudoun County, VA
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    10,412

    Default

    I agree with the basic premise that horse ownership is a big responsibility, and people should take it very seriously and not toss a horse aside just because it gets a little banged up or something. BUT.....

    I actually don't have that much of a problem with people who seek to give their horses away to a good and loving home. Some of these horses, which may only be sound for light riding or pony rides, might for example make some kid very happy, and I think it is better that the horse gets lots of cuddles than be essentially abandoned and unvisited in a pasture 100 miles from its owner.

    Also, better to see someone make an effort to place a horse through the giveaways forum than for them to dump it at a killpen somewhere. And, sadly, sometimes people find themselves through no fault of their own in a situation where coming up with a little extra money isn't just a matter of giving up luxuries or living on mac and cheese for a few weeks.

    Finally, I would not advise ever sending a horse to where you cannot visit him/her on a regular basis. I have seen horses receive very poor treatment in some instances, even in very fancy barns with BNTs, when the owner is absent.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2005
    Posts
    290

    Angry Before you judge...

    We presently own a 12yo OTTB mare that was given to my daughter over two years ago to be a 4-H project horse. This mare was "rescued" (purchased for $1000) by our former trainer who thought she was doing us a great favor by giving us a horse - and we were too stupid at the time to say "no". I mean, I had some inkling at the time that I probably should say "no", and I wasn't too stupid to know that there is no such thing as a free horse - but for some reason, I said "ok". This former trainer truly believed she could make a successful project of any horse, and I guess we bought into that at the time.

    Long, long story short, mare suffered catastrophic withers injury shortly after retraining began. We kept the faith, paid the vet bills, tended the mare, and the injury healed after about eight months. Began retraining again last fall - ran into issues - put mare in professional training - pro couldn't make any breakthroughs - got another vet opinion - kept going with training - mare kept getting worse rather than better - another vet opinion - and have finally gotten to the point where we've HAD IT UP TO HERE with our injured horse. She looks sound, but she doesn't act it under saddle or when in work. She is well-cared for, current on worming, feet, teeth, due for shots. She is generally a very nice horse to be around on the ground, a people horse, gets along with other horses - but when it comes to doing what we acquired her to do, it isn't happening - and hasn't ever.

    So - as a responsible horse owner who does not own property and really and truly can not afford more than one horse long term, what should I do? Tell my daughter "oh so sorry" - we can't get you a horse that you can ride and train and achieve your goals on and have fun with because we are stuck forever with this useless mare. We love our mare, we want a good life for her, but we don't want to keep her forever. There's a sale barn between where I live and where the mare lives that has horse auctions once a month. Now, I don't want to go there, but you know what, if my finances suddenly changed drastically for the worse, I might be in a position where I would have to do so. So, yes, if I could find a good home for the mare right this minute, I would give her away.

    Groom&Taxi



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2001
    Location
    Hotlanta
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    5,896

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Perfect Pony
    I don't know where you live, but if you think you can find that anywhere near me in that price range you are high...
    ROTFLMAO! The same is true of my area. You are lucky if you can find PASTURE board for $300/month, never mind a stall (think $500-$1600+).

    Alysheba, board may be cheap where you live (heck, there are places in the US where full board at a FANCY barn with a huge indoor is less than $500, and I'm jealous! ) BUT, in many places, keeping a horse is pretty expensive...especially when the horse has special needs.

    Still, I'm totally with you in thinking people should NOT look to "dump" their old/injured horses. I know that not everyone wants to keep a horse "for life," competitive riders especially; still, if that's your choice, you can choose to PERSONALLY find THE perfect "forever" home for the horse, rather than trying to make it disappear as quickly as possible. Old age and injury do not lessen the responsibility an owner has to make sure, one way or another, that the horse will continue to receive good care.

    One thing that upsets me is when people choose to keep the horse for the rest of its days, but then totally neglect it; they'll bring it to be "retired" out in a field, and think that's the end of their responsibility (akin to putting a loved one in a nursing home and NEVER going to see them or make sure they are cared for properly). Makes me so sad to see this. How many little girls would LOVE to brush, braid, bathe, and fuss over a snoozing elderly horse/pony? How many gutless beginner adults would PAY to be able to sit on something that is totally pushbutton and safe, even if it has a little hitch in its getalong? PLENTY, if what happens at my barn is any indication. Our "veterans" are revered and appreciated by all! Those with absentee owners are frequently "drafted" into light duty of some kind, with the owner's permission of course...even if that duty is only to tolerate a bunch of kids with brushes. That's how it should be!

    Like Tom Smith said, "Just because it's a little banged up, doesn't mean you throw it away." EVERY horse is useful as long as it breathes; it just has to have the right job, and the owner needs to take responsibility in finding that job.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2005
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    Up and down the west coast!
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    3,886

    Default

    Well, no one says you have to pasture board in your area. I couldn't afford my two retirees either if they were in SoCal. That's why they are not. Moving a horse to an area with cheap, safe retirement board is a one-time trailer ride expense. Then you're just looking at around $150 a month to maintain them. I don't understand anyone who can afford horse ownership at all not being able to come up with $150 a month. Many of us waste that much at Starbucks, going to the movies, etc. If you can't come up with $150, good heavens, what do you do when you have to call the vet?

    I do understand giving away a horse who can be used for light riding to a home that only needs that from him, assuming you keep tabs on him. But if you have a disabled horse or a senior horse, you have a responsibility to ensure their safety and that certainly doesn't mean taking them to an auction. Euthanasia is a better choice than an auction, hands down.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2006
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    1,308

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by catknsn
    Well, no one says you have to pasture board in your area. I couldn't afford my two retirees either if they were in SoCal. That's why they are not. Moving a horse to an area with cheap, safe retirement board is a one-time trailer ride expense. Then you're just looking at around $150 a month to maintain them. I don't understand anyone who can afford horse ownership at all not being able to come up with $150 a month. Many of us waste that much at Starbucks, going to the movies, etc. If you can't come up with $150, good heavens, what do you do when you have to call the vet?

    I do understand giving away a horse who can be used for light riding to a home that only needs that from him, assuming you keep tabs on him. But if you have a disabled horse or a senior horse, you have a responsibility to ensure their safety and that certainly doesn't mean taking them to an auction. Euthanasia is a better choice than an auction, hands down.

    EXACTLY!!! I agree completely. And as fas as ppl's "euphoric" idea of finding a "companion home" for their horse. There is a 99% chance that there are other "companions" on the farm as well. Which means a kind hearted soul doesn't know where to draw the line, and cares only about saving these animals. Just because they have chosen to do this DOESN"T mean they aren't being taken advantage of, and they shouldn't be taking on the financial burden...they do because the owners of these horses DIDNT step up to the plate, not because they think the owner is doing the right thing. In fact, there is a post in here from a "companion" horse person. I didn't hear any understanding in her voice, only disgust at the owners who disregard their loyal mounts like garbage.

    I know a lot of ppl who go out of their way to offer help that don't realize they are being taken advantage of. Willing participation from a 3rd party doesn't make what the horse owner is doing right.

    And I don't see any reason why boarding your horse long distance is a problem if you are getting updates, especially if someone else who boards there is willing to "keep an eye" on the horses upkeep. As far as "not being visited" I think we are truly being full of ourselves if we think that. Baring very few exceptions (and those exeptions wouldn't end up being throw aways) most of our horses wouldn't cry too many tears if they were offered a life of leisure, and the peaceful company of other horses, and didn't have our mugs in their faces everyday. Besides, even pasture horses are grained everyday. They would still have plenty of daily human contact. I also have heard a lot of anomosity at B.O.'s. I've boarded at 3 places in my life, and all 3 places treated my horse like their own. At my current stable, one of the ladies only comes around once a month, the B.O. gives her just as many scratches and treats as she does my horse. Find a place that boards horses for love, not profit, and you will never have a sleepless night.
    I've got the 3 things men want. I'm hot, and I'm smart!

    -The 6th Member Of The Bareback Riders Clique-



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2006
    Location
    MN
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    1,308

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Groom&Taxi
    We presently own a 12yo OTTB mare that was given to my daughter over two years ago to be a 4-H project horse. This mare was "rescued" (purchased for $1000) by our former trainer who thought she was doing us a great favor by giving us a horse - and we were too stupid at the time to say "no". I mean, I had some inkling at the time that I probably should say "no", and I wasn't too stupid to know that there is no such thing as a free horse - but for some reason, I said "ok". This former trainer truly believed she could make a successful project of any horse, and I guess we bought into that at the time.

    Long, long story short, mare suffered catastrophic withers injury shortly after retraining began. We kept the faith, paid the vet bills, tended the mare, and the injury healed after about eight months. Began retraining again last fall - ran into issues - put mare in professional training - pro couldn't make any breakthroughs - got another vet opinion - kept going with training - mare kept getting worse rather than better - another vet opinion - and have finally gotten to the point where we've HAD IT UP TO HERE with our injured horse. She looks sound, but she doesn't act it under saddle or when in work. She is well-cared for, current on worming, feet, teeth, due for shots. She is generally a very nice horse to be around on the ground, a people horse, gets along with other horses - but when it comes to doing what we acquired her to do, it isn't happening - and hasn't ever.

    So - as a responsible horse owner who does not own property and really and truly can not afford more than one horse long term, what should I do? Tell my daughter "oh so sorry" - we can't get you a horse that you can ride and train and achieve your goals on and have fun with because we are stuck forever with this useless mare. We love our mare, we want a good life for her, but we don't want to keep her forever. There's a sale barn between where I live and where the mare lives that has horse auctions once a month. Now, I don't want to go there, but you know what, if my finances suddenly changed drastically for the worse, I might be in a position where I would have to do so. So, yes, if I could find a good home for the mare right this minute, I would give her away.

    Groom&Taxi
    If you found a home, the person who took the horse would not have understanding for your position, they would think you are pathetic. Believe me, I hear it all the time. They will be nice to your face so you don't take the horse to auction where it will end up dogs meat, but as soon as you leave the convo will be "Well, another one dumped one off" Heck, read the post above! It comes straight from a person who takes on these horses!

    It sounds like your playing the "blame game" with the trainer. And maybe it is the trainers fault, but it is NOT the horses. And you don't have a right to dump your financial burdens on someone else. What, do you think these farms that take in horses like yours won the lottery somewhere down the line? What makes them any better off then you to financially take care of this animal? The truth is their not, they are just acting in the best interests of the horse, NOT their pocket book!

    And I'm sorry that you and your spouse have chosen a financial path that makes you unable to care for more than one horse, like the poster below said, what would you do if you had to go to the vet??? Vet bills can be $500 easy! It sounds like you have already been down that road.

    What message are you sending to your child by saying "When something you have committed to can't do the things it used to do, you get rid of it by dumping the problem on someone else, or killing it." Like I said, sounds like an everyday divorce in America, or how a lot of ppl treat their parents when they toss them into nursing homes.

    A better message to send to your child is for you guys (and her) to do whatever it takes to make sure the animal gets the life it deserves. Like I said, get a damn paper route! And I will tell you what, possibly being a couple hundred dollars away from financial ruin is NO WAY to raise a child! It sounds to me like you couldn't afford to even get her a horse in the first place! Maybe you should think about piano lessons instead of a live animal that depends on you for its very existance.

    By the way, your "auction" comment was a really bad idea, especially in light of the great lengths the posters on this board went to in the last week to save 4 wonderful horses from ppl like you.
    I've got the 3 things men want. I'm hot, and I'm smart!

    -The 6th Member Of The Bareback Riders Clique-



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 24, 2004
    Location
    TN/VA
    Posts
    415

    Wink Hmm...

    I think the case is different for each person. I don't know if anyone remembers my posts about my old horse or not (hano/tb gelding with a drooling problem????). To sum it up, after having multiple vets look at him, broken bones on my part, and vet bills tripling the amount we even paid for him, we could no longer afford to keep hauling him to veterinary clinics and racking up with laundry list of bills. Not only was there the financial problem, but he was also not the right horse for me. He had my number, so to speak.

    I ended up giving him away on the COTH board, and he's now living fat and happy at MHJLittlefields farm in Indiana. She was able to afford the care needed to get him healthy again, and has the experience to deal with his... odd behavior. I personally couldn't be happier he's where he's at now.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 1999
    Location
    Rochester, NY
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    12,187

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    Ouch, alysheba! Though I understand your point of view, and have the unsound for 18 of the 19 years I have owned her horse to prove it, I don't think that any of us has the right to insult anyone else for the way that they think. Besides, you sure won't get anyone to change their minds that way. Let's try to keep this discussion from degenerating into an exchange of insults, shall we?

    That said, I think that more people need to consider euthanasia as an option. If you can't find that "perfect home" for the horse that isn't right for you then better a quick and painless trip to the Rainbow Bridge, than the chance of a horrific end that can come on going through many auctions. It's hard to do, but many times I feel it is the right decision.
    Originally Posted by Alagirl
    We just love to shame poor people...when in reality, we are all just peasants.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 24, 2004
    Location
    Sergeantsville, NJ
    Posts
    2,539

    Default

    Well, it's pretty hard here in the mid-Atlantic states (NJ, eastern PA, southern NY, CT - you get the idea) to find pasture board at all, let alone for $200/month. Maybe $350-$500. Although, to be sure, I agree wholeheartedly with your message. I'm struggling (and will continue to do so, I think) with images of the kill pen I saw when I went to get April...

    Uh, just read Groom & Taxi's post - please put her down if your are unable to resolve her problems. If she is unsound or unwilling under saddle, what makes you think that you just aren't handing the problem over to the next unsuspecting owner? The REPUTABLE sale barns around here ride the horse before they accept it for sale and if they think it won't sell to a riding home, won't accept it. Those are the horses that will be passed from owner to owner until they are standing at the kill pen/ If you want to PM me, I'l tell you EXACTLY what those conditions are like - no use in ruining EVERYONE's day.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2005
    Posts
    30

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Groom&Taxi
    Long, long story short, mare suffered catastrophic withers injury shortly after retraining began. We kept the faith, paid the vet bills, tended the mare, and the injury healed after about eight months. Began retraining again last fall - ran into issues - put mare in professional training - pro couldn't make any breakthroughs - got another vet opinion - kept going with training - mare kept getting worse rather than better - another vet opinion - and have finally gotten to the point where we've HAD IT UP TO HERE with our injured horse. She looks sound, but she doesn't act it under saddle or when in work. She is well-cared for, current on worming, feet, teeth, due for shots. She is generally a very nice horse to be around on the ground, a people horse, gets along with other horses - but when it comes to doing what we acquired her to do, it isn't happening - and hasn't ever. Groom&Taxi
    I'm trying not to be judgmental here, but this para kind of indicates you're being very unfair to the horse. You acquired this horse with a plan, true, but had she not been injured doing what _you_ wanted her to do, she might very well have achieved the potential the trainer saw in her. And now, I'm sorry, but it really sounds like you're complaining she hasn't healed quickly enough to suit your purposes. I wish we all had a pop up timer, to let others know we're completely healed after a catastrophic injury. It would makes everyone's lives a whole lot easier, don't you think?

    Edited to add: How wonderful she's very nice to be with on the ground, and gets on great with other horses. I hope it's a pleasure to be in her company.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2005
    Location
    A quaint little town in New England
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    132

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    That particular horse was for their young daughter. Not everyone is made of money, and affording 1 horse plus a child is a big expense. Do you think it's fair for the daughter not to be able to excel in her riding because of this horse? I would find the horse another home and get my daughter something she could enjoy. I have an elderly horse that I am keeping for life, but a few years back I had a wonderful gelding that had a major accident out in the pasture. He was never the same after the injury and 3 years later I decided to find him a new home. I could only afford 1 horse at the time and I really wanted to progress in my riding. It was wrong to keep pushing this horse when he was physically unable to do the job. I GAVE him away to a woman in NY that had 100 acres of lush pastures and several other horses. He was happy and got plenty of attention from the woman and her 2 small children. They even rode him lightly. I know I did the right thing and would do it again in a heartbeat...

    On another note, I was recently given a 7 yr old QH - he is perfectly healthy, just a little too much horse for the former owner. She couldn't wait to sell him before getting a new horse. We use him for trail riding since my trainer doesn't think he is suitable for dressage. Am I such a rotten person because I am now trying to sell him to someone who will appreciate his talents? The former owner knows he is for sale and trusts my judgement to find him a good home.

    Don't judge others until you walk a mile in their shoes......


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
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    Jan. 24, 2004
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    Sergeantsville, NJ
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    I think a BIG part of the issue here is that the poster indicated that she would take the horse to auction - didn't get into the whole "find her a good forever home, etc.". Again, after seeing kill pen conditions, I personally will NEVER sell another horse to anyone - free lease, yes, but I will never take the risk of them ending up in the kill pen. Anyone who wants to know what the conditions are, PM me - no one, myself included, has the stomach to read it on the board.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2006
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    ol Virginny
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    Janweber, you really should post about the poor bewildered, hungry, tired, injured horses standing in the kill pen...maybe it will get some folks to act more responsibly. And maybe it'll get a few out of their comfy chair to go rescue one or more.
    And I agree with the posters that say long distance retirement boarding with "updates" are risky. People will lie to you if you aren't in a position to check on your animal regularly. Photos can be doctored to make a miserable horse look good. Some of those "retirement" homes are all about the monthly checks coming in. They couldn't care less about your horse. They turn him out in the back 40 and its up to him to survive as best he can. That may work for some horses but it doesn't wrk for others.
    If you don't have the money/space to take care of your injured/old/retired animal and are not 100% sure that he'll be properly cared for in a different home, then euthanasia IS the kindest option.
    There are worse things than dead. If horses could talk they'd probably tell you that. I know that the 5 horses at a farm up the road wouldn't miss life as they are living it.



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